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“Can We Live on USA Made Only?” Intervie

September 30, 2014 Comments off

“Can We Live on USA Made Only?” Intervie

September 30, 2014 Comments off

To Write or Not too Right?

March 16, 2013 Comments off

imageI am afraid that the end of more than 300 years of Cursive writing is at an end in education, and that bothers me.

We are raising future generations who may not be able to write, period. I guess I would be considered a cursive loyalist.

Does it bother anyone else? Are you concerned that your kids or the very next generation of children won’t even know what it is? If I were choosing a school for my children, I would seek out the ones that still teach the basics. And, then add in technology. I love modern technology, but at the expense of it, we should not give up teaching written communication-more importantly, cursive writing.

Thoughts anyone?

Cursive handwriting has been taught for more than 300 years in U.S. schools and was once the principle way of communicating. It was used for all public documents, such as land deeds, legal paperwork, and business records, and for personal letters and even generals’ orders in battle. The quality of cursive writing was an indicator of social status and educational level (Mehegan, 2009; Supon, 2009; Wolfe, 2009; Wallace & Schomer, 1994).

For decades, American students spent 45 minutes every day learning and practicing cursive writing.

Until the 1970s, penmanship was a separate daily lesson from first through sixth grade and a separate grade on report cards. Since that time, however, its importance in the elementary school curriculum has declined steadily (New American Cursive Penmanship Program, 2009; Carpenter, 2007; Pressler, 2006; Francis, 2000).

Fro more reading, here is a very recent article on the cursive debate:

  • Common Core State Standards for what students are expected to learn have been picked up by most of the states in the union. Those standards don’t require cursive. Keyboarding skills, however, are featured in the writing standards. That means most states no longer have a mandate for teaching cursive.
  • In the 1960s and 1970s, the Zaner-Bloser Company, which has been publishing a penmanship curriculum since 1904, recommended 40 minutes of handwriting instruction per day. By the 1980s, it suggested just 15 minutes. Zaner-Bloser offers course work through eighth grade but admits that schools rarely purchase materials beyond the third grade.
  • In Zaner-Bloser’s 2005 national survey, a majority of elementary school teachers reported spending one hour or less on handwriting per week(Suddath, 2009; Kelley, 2007).
  • According to a 2007 nationwide survey on handwriting instruction by researchers at Vanderbilt University (Graham et al., 2007), cursive handwriting is still widely taught in U.S. public and private schools. The researchers surveyed a random sample of approximately 200 teachers in grades 1-3 in all 50 states. Ninety percent of the responding teachers stated that their schools required instruction in handwriting. In schools that taught handwriting, 50 percent of second grade teachers and 90 percent of third grade teachers offered instruction in cursive handwriting.
  • Teachers reported that they spent about 60 minutes per week, or 12-15 minutes per day, teaching cursive. Graham and colleagues (2007) cautioned that survey results were based on self-reported numbers and that a separate study with direct observation of 22 teachers in one school district found that far less time was devoted to cursive handwriting.
  • Graham and colleagues (2007) also reported that school districts varied significantly in the amount of handwriting instruction they provided to students. For example, the researchers visited second and third grade classrooms that offered virtually no instruction in cursive handwriting.
  • In general, their observations of U.S. classrooms found that the emphasis in U.S. schools have shifted from the formation of letters to the ability to write legibly and efficiently. Other researchers have noted that cursive writing’s declining importance in the curriculum is reflected by a lessening of the standards used to evaluate it. Over the years, the goal of teaching penmanship has shifted from “high quality” to “legibility” (Pressler, 2006; Wallace & Schomer, 1994).

Share this post if you support cursive writing as core curriculum in schools and across education.

Holiday Shopping| E-tailers | FB Apps & More

December 2, 2012 3 comments

Save GreenThe initial purpose of this post is to help you save some “green”, be greener during the holidays, help save you some time, and save the environment by cutting down on your use of gasoline and emissions by driving all over the place for your holiday shopping. Consider making your own homemade holiday gifts as well.  I would love to hear from others who have made their own unique gifts.   I have sprinkled in some other social news  below for additional holiday cheer.

By far, my favorite shopping App is Redlaser!  It is a “Top 10 Must Have App for your IPhone” ―says  The New York Times ,  “If you only have one shopping app on your cell Phone, this is the one to have.”― Digital Trends.               I have used it for ALL of my holiday shopping both online and locally and have saved several hundred dollars already.

A Selection of Useful Holiday Shopping Tidbits:   

It’s Official: Facebook Apps Have a Share Button (AllFacebook). Users asked for it, and Facebook responded. The social network announced Thursday that its native applications for iOS and Android devices now include a share button. That means that folks using either app can now pass on their witty musings, puppy pictures or daddy daughter dance pictures to their online friends with a simple tap in their news feeds [Engadget]

There is now a BandPage Connect Plugs Bands Into Promoters, Fans, Facebook [AllFacebook}]

TechCrunch Facebook’s iOS users have long been able to tag friends in posts, but had to append them to the end of the update as “with [Drew Olanoff].” That made for some funky grammar, or redundancy if you needed to refer to a specific friend in the text of your update. Now you can tag friends in-line so your prose flows.

LA Times / Tech Now Additionally, Apple device users can now send each other Facebook messages with smileys and other icons from the emoji keyboard. The keyboard can be enabled in the iOS Settings app.

When Colleges Woo Students Through Social Media: Less Viewbooks, More Facebook (Time)
When Ashley Romero found out she had been accepted to the University of Georgia, it wasn’t through a letter in the mail. It wasn’t even by logging onto her computer and visiting Georgia’s admissions website. It was on her iPhone, as she and a friend were driving down the highway toward summer camp.

Who Mapped It Best During Election 2012? (CJR / Between the Spreadsheets).  As CJR‘s Meta Newsroom showed, a glut of media outlets incorporated digital innovation into their reporting during the recent election. One resurfaced over and again: the map. For the outlets just dipping their toes into the data journalism sea, maps presented a relatively easy opportunity to make interactive. For the heavyweights, it was a chance to wade in much deeper.

Upcoming Events: 

Inside Social Apps  – Developing & Monetizing on Social & Mobile Platforms, December 3 | New York City
Inside Social Apps brings together today’s leading developers of social and mobile apps and games for an intensive summit on the future of app and game growth and monetization on social and mobile platforms. Register now.

Online Production for Writers and Editors – starts November 20 | ONLINE
Create multi-dimensional content for digital mediums. Learn more.

My Sources Today Came From: Morning Media Newsfeed & Mashable

Morning Media Newsfeed Say they needs you! Send them your story tips, job changes, insider gossip, and all that other good stuff: tips@mediabistro.com. More than 160,000 people in the media business read this email every day. To learn about advertising or other creative partnerships, contact Dave Arganbright at   (212) 547-7931  or via email.

A Perspective on The Economy

November 3, 2012 Comments off

A PERSONAL COMMUNICATION and COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVE:

We are an impatient people.  And, no matter who becomes the next president, one can not microwave (systemic) change.

It took a full ten+ years to pull us out of the great depression. We complain about our national debt but change begins at the individual level as well. Who of you in four years has paid down All of your OWN debt or have you just continued to go farther into debt (possibly some, but not All)                     How many of you have hired just one extra person for a job to keep a family from going under, (split a higher paying job budget between two workers)?

How many of you have fed or invited an unemployed family down the street from you in foreclosure for dinner?

It starts with us, from the bottom up and not from the top down in all our efforts.

What ever similarities are drawn from the Great Depression and what we see today. Can we really immediate change in under 4 years?

1) I believe that there are two major differences in the economic circumstances of 1933 and 2008 which transcend other issues and have literally save us in some respects comparatively speaking.  First, thousands of banks “failed” between 1929 and 1933, wiping out the savings of millions of “hard-working, playing by the rules” middle-class Americans. Since fall 2008, not a single depositor in a U.S. bank has lost a dime of savings due to FDR’s Banking Act of 1933, which created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

While the stock market and housing prices tanked, the fact that bank accounts were intact was of immense psychological value to savers at all income levels. Undoubtedly, this depositor sense of security had a positive effect on the stock market rebounding quickly so now it is more than double what it was in February 2009.

2) Secondly, and just as importantly, because of Social Security, started in 1935, the purchasing power of today’s seniors has been greatly, although not entirely, protected. Social Security payments, combined with the unemployment insurance benefits (also initiated in 1935) paid to the millions laid off due to the downturn, have kept consumer purchases much more stable than they otherwise would have been. This is in contrast to the complete removal by 1933 of the purchasing power of nearly 25 percent of the workforce that became suddenly unemployed. The economy just shriveled up.

1. Stock Market Crash of 1929

Many believe erroneously that the stock market crash that occurred on Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929 is one and the same with the Great Depression. In fact, it was one of the major causes that led to the Great Depression. Two months after the original crash in October, stockholders had lost more than $40 billion dollars. Even though the stock market began to regain some of its losses, by the end of 1930, it just was not enough and America truly entered what is called the Great Depression.

2. Bank Failures
Throughout the 1930s over 9,000 banks failed. Bank deposits were uninsured and thus as banks failed people simply lost their savings. Surviving banks, unsure of the economic situation and concerned for their own survival, stopped being as willing to create new loans. This exacerbated the situation leading to less and less expenditures.

3. Reduction in Purchasing Across the Board

With the stock market crash and the fears of further economic woes, individuals from all classes stopped purchasing items. This then led to a reduction in the number of items produced and thus a reduction in the workforce. As people lost their jobs, they were unable to keep up with paying for items they had bought through installment plans and their items were repossessed. More and more inventory began to accumulate. The unemployment rate rose above 25% which meant, of course, even less spending to help alleviate the economic situation.

4. American Economic Policy with Europe

As businesses began failing, the government created the Smoot-Hawley Tariff in 1930 to help protect American companies. This charged a high tax for imports thereby leading to less trade between America and foreign countries along with some economic retaliation.

5. Drought Conditions

While not a direct cause of the Great Depression, the drought that occurred in the Mississippi Valley in 1930 was of such proportions that many could not even pay their taxes or other debts and had to sell their farms for no profit to themselves. The area was nicknamed “The Dust Bowl.” This was the topic of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath.

6. Unemployment to continue to purchase good and services within the economy

Throughout the Great Depression, there was little information on the extent of unemployment in the country. More important, there was no good way to assess whether the situation was getting better or worse. The wealth of timely statistical information on the labor market that we now take for granted simply didn’t exist. Throughout the 1930s, researchers grappled with the issue of how to measure unemployment. To begin with, there wasn’t agreement on how to conceptualize or define the condition. Simply asking those out of work if they “wanted” work or if they were “able” or “willing” to work proved to be too subjective to serve as unemployment criteria. At the same time, attempts to gauge the number of jobless by looking at declines in employment or counting the registrations at public employment offices were found to be incomplete. By the way, the second dip during the Depression was in 1937 and came as a result of austerity measures.

The whole unemployment schema today is a numbers game and  it all depends on which lens one is looking through to sell those numbers. Systemically, we have more people, more kids, more families to feed no ifs and or butts about it today than in 1930.

One unemployment perspective today is about the actual current civilian workforce vs 208 against the total US population. Another is all of those not being counted who have dropped off the employment labor roster and workforce grid all together, and another is DOL’s BLS  reporting which has significantly changed on how we look at number vs. how we looked at unemployment in the 1930’s.

Newsweek Magazine to End an Era of Print

October 19, 2012 3 comments

Newsweek CoverNewsweek is closing down it’s print edition at the end of 2012.  As a result of this news, I bought a copy of Newsweek for my archives last night.   In 2003, Newsweek’s worldwide circulation was more than 4 million, including 2.7 million in the U.S; by 2010 it was down to 1.5 million (with newsstand sales declining to just over 40 thousand copies per week). Newsweek publishes editions in Japanese, Korean, Polish, Spanish, Rioplatense SpanishArabic, and Turkish, as well as an English language Newsweek InternationalRussian Newsweek, published since 2004, was shut in October 2010.  The Bulletin (an Australian weekly until 2008) incorporated an international news section from Newsweek.  Based in New York City, the magazine has 22 bureaus: nine in the U.S.: New York City, Los Angeles,  Chicago/Detroit, Dallas, Miami, Washington, D.C., Boston and San Francisco, as well as overseas in London, Paris, Berlin, Moscow, JerusalemBaghdad, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Beijing, South AsiaCape Town, Mexico City and Buenos Aires.

 

I come from an era where reading a real newspaper or weekly news magazine ( see top US magazines by circulation) was a regular event for me.  Sadly, it’s been probably about a year or more since I’ve read a full newspaper from front page to the back.  And now, it may actually become a lost “art” of sorts, sooner than one might think.  I believe our newspaper journalists are an endangered species.

In fact, I am starting to collect a few newspapers. Just a few here and there that are news worthy or interesting to me, like my earlier post about my late 1800 Penny Press Newspaper from France, Newsweek, Time, the election of President Obama, and the death’s of Princess Diana and Micheal Jackson.

Here are some examples of newspapers that closed during 2012: 

The New Orleans Times-Picayune, a fixture in the Big Easy since 1837, will slash its staff and production schedule, going from 7 to 3 days a week beginning this fall. The body count isn’t known yet, but estimates are that at least a third of the staff will be fired. Those who stay are expected to take pay cuts.

The Times-Picayune, which is owned by Newhouse Newspapers, is apparently taking a page from the Ann Arbor News, another Newhouse paper that cut its frequency to twice-weekly more than three years ago.

The Detroit Media Partnership was the first to eliminate daily frequency in late 2008. Many smaller papers have since quietly cu

Newspaper dispenser, Newspaperst money-losing Monday, Tuesday and Saturday editions.

Additionally, The Birmingham News, Mobile Press-Register and Huntsville Times will also reduce frequency to three days a week. They’ll become part of a “new digitally focused media company” called the Alabama Media Group.  Read more on Al.com.

According to Newspaper Layoffs  for 2012, there have been more than 1850 layoffs and buyouts have occurred thus far at U.S. newspapers.  Here is a list by the same source of closed print newspapers.

Tracing the decline and death of each newspapers is tough.  But, a report from the FCC.gov in 2010 on page 41 shows a list of about 212 closed newspapers from 2007-2010 [ it also offers some excellent historical insights as well].

Newspapers across the country have experienced severe cutbacks during the past decade, which has undermined their ability to perform their role as the nation’s watchdog.

Ad revenue dropped nearly 48 percent between 2005 and 2010, and with it the industry’s annual spending on reporting and editing capacity dropped by $1.6 billion, from 2006 to 2009, a reduction of more than 25 percent, according to the Pew Research Center’s

Project for Excellence in Journalism and Rick Edmonds of the Poynter Institute. The number of full-time journalists at daily newspapers fell from a peak of about 56,900 in 1989 to 41,600 in 2010, a level not seen since before the Watergate era.

Below is more information about are some of those newspapers which died in 2009.   As you may have noticed, newspapers had a very rough year.  But you may not quite appreciate the magnitude of the collapse, just from 2009 alone. “Today is the end of an era,” said Cynthia Cather Burton, editor of the 104-year-old Clarke Courier.

Just in 2009:

  • 105 newspapers have been shuttered.
  • more than 10,000 newspaper jobs were lost.
  • Print ad sales fell 30% in Q1 ’09.
  • 23 of the top 25 newspapers reported circulation declines between 7% and 20%

Here is a list of the dead Newspapers from 2009:

West Bloomfield Eccentric
Troy Eccentric
Rochester Eccentric
Southfield Eccentric
The Carson Times
Douglas Times
Fallon Star Presss
The Daily Reporter
Dennis Pennysaver
Yarmouth Pennysaver
East Bridgewater Star
West Bridgewater Times
Whitman Times
Hanson Town Crier
Plymouth Bulletin
Algonquin Countryside
Cary-Grove Countryside
Wauconda Courier
Arlington Heights Post
Elk Grove Times
Hoffman Estates Review
Palatine Countryside
Rolling Meadows Review
Schaumburg Review Bloomfield Journal
Windsor Journal
Windsor Locks Journal
Coatesville Ledger
Donegal Ledger
Downingtown Ledger
Doylestown Patriot 
East Hartford Gazette
Elizabethtown Chronicle 
Gazette Advertiser
Germantown Courier
Mount Airy Times Express
Harlem Valley Times
Millbrook Round Table
Voice Ledger
Hyde Park Townsman
The Independent
New Hope Gazette
Northern Star
Oxford Tribune
Parkesburg Post Ledger
Solanco Sun Ledger 
Pawling News Chronicle
Petoskey Citizen-Journal
Putnam County Courier 
Quakertown Free Press
Register Herald
The Town Meeting
American Fork Citizen
Lehi Free Press
Lone Peak Press
Orem Times
Pleasant Grove Review
Baltimore Examiner
The Bethel Beacon
The Brookfield Journal
The Kent Good Times Dispatch
The Litchfield Enquirer
Big Sky Sun
The Bulletin
The City Star
Dakota Journal
The Democrat
East Iowa Herald
Fort Collins Now
Grapevine Sun
Hardee Sun
The Hershey Chronicle
Hill Country View
Iraan News
Jeanerette Enterprise
The Journal-Messenger
LA City Beat
Lake Elmo Leader
Lake Norman Times
Lakota Journal
Los Gatos Weekender
West San Jose Resident
Maricopa Tribune
McCamey News
The Milford Observer
Ming Pao New York
Ming Pao San Francisco
The Newton Record
Oak Cliff Tribune
The Rockingham News
Rocky Mountain News
Stillwater Courier
Vail Sun
Valley Journal
The Weekly Almanac
Wheeling Countryside
Des Plaines Times
Mount Prospect Times

So what are we to do? Where will the local obituary postings go? Newspapers also supplied huge amounts of revenue to the postal system for shipping. Is it also somewhat linked to the decline of the US Post Office as well? It is indeed having a ripple effect, I am sure. But, I digress.

Is you newspaper dead?  What do you do for your news now?  I am particularly interested in the older age groups who may not use social media and the Internet so profusely.

Feel free to tell me about your dead newspaper, provide it’s  name in the comments section, and what you miss most about print news.

The following state of our media, trends and information comes directly from PEW’s  recent 2012 State of the Media Report which also show significant changes in how people get their news.

PEW indicates that 70% of Facebook news consumers get most of their story links from friends and family.

And, only 13% say most links that they follow come from news organizations. On Twitter, however, the mix is more even: 36% say most of the links they follow come from friends and family, 27% say most come from news organizations, and 18% mostly follow links from non-news entities such as think tanks.

By 2015, roughly one out of every five display ad dollars is expected to go to Facebook, according to the same source. So who is still putting advertising in newspapers?   Well here are some more interesting facts.

As many as 100 newspapers are expected in coming months to join the roughly 150 dailies that have already moved to some kind of digital subscription model.

In part, newspapers are making this move after witnessing the success of The New York Times, which now has roughly 390,000 online subscribers.  The move is also driven by steep drops in ad revenue. Newspaper industry revenue — circulation and advertising combined — has shrunk 43% since 2000.

In 2011, newspapers overall lost roughly $10 in print ad revenue for every new $1 gained online. (That suggests no improvement from what a separate PEJ study of 38 papers found regarding 2010, when the print losses to digital gains in the sample were a $7-to-$1 ratio.)

Furthermore, newsrooms continued to shrink as companies, to remain in the black, felt the need for more rounds of cost reductions. The contemporary newsroom has fewer articles to produce after trims in the physical size of paper and reduction of the space devoted to news. But the remaining editors and reporters are also being stretched further by the need to generate content suitable for smartphones and tablets as well as establishing a social media presence.

This is all in addition to putting out the print paper daily and feeding breaking news to websites. In company management, the shift to outsiders with backgrounds in digital, especially at major companies, was striking.

The CEOs of Gannett (Craig Dubow) and the industry’s largest private company, Media News (William Dean Singleton), stepped aside for health reasons.

New York Times chief executive Janet Robinson retired under pressure late in the year. Associated Press president and chief executive Tom Curley announced early in 2012 that he would be retiring, too. During the course of the year, the top editor’s job turned over at The New York Times, USA Today, The Los Angeles Times and a host of metros.

Newspapers began changing hands again in late 2011. The trend of private equity owners gaining control through bankruptcy proceedings continues to grow and they tend to take an aggressive approach to digital transition. The most high-profile example is John Paton, the chief executive backed by Alden Global Capital, who is pursuing a “digital-first” strategy at the Journal Register and MediaNews Group papers.The biggest of the private equity takeovers will come when Tribune Company bankruptcy proceedings, now in their fourth year, conclude.

Probably the biggest transaction in 2011 was the $143 million sale of The New York Times’ 16-paper region group to Halifax Media, a company formed two years ago to buy The Daytona Beach News-Journal. The Times had assembled the papers and run them at high profit margins in the 1970s and 1980s to balance out business ups and downs at its flagship paper. Lately, the regional group was shedding revenue faster than The New York Times itself, so the company chose to sell the papers and invest the proceeds in digital development.

Important footnotes to read more about this overall topic.

  1. comScore. “Digital Omnivores: How Tablets, Smartphones and Connected Devices Are Changing U.S. Digital Media Consumption Habits.” Subscriber-access only at www.comscore.com. October 2011.
  2. eMarketer. “Facebook’s US User Growth Slows but Twitter Sees Double-Digit Gains.” March 5, 2012.
  3. Olmstead, Kenny; Mitchell, Amy, and Rosenstiel, Tom. “Navigating News Online: Where People Go, How They Get There and What Lures Them Away.” Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. May 9, 2011.
  4. Search Engine Use 2012.” Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. March 9, 2012.
  5. The Facebook Fascination on Social Media.” Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. Feb. 2, 2012.

I for one, will miss print news both from a sniff and scratch standpoint but also because three generations in my family have been associated with news and journalism in one way or another. First with my grandmother who was a published philatelic journalist,  my father wrote for his school newspaper, and I have written and published news both locally and nationally.

Thanks for reading!

Types of Blogs, Blog Resources, List of 200 Blogging Sites & Platforms

September 4, 2012 1 comment

blogs in the cloud, blog cloudThere are SO many types of blogs these days.  They range from free public blogs to paid blog enterprise platforms as well as personal blogs, corporate and organizational blogs, and even blogs by genre or topic. For example, there are blogs by topic such as environmental blogs.

Blogging is a broad topic, especially if one is trying to wade through the forest to get to trees and it could be daunting. I hope this post sheds some light on the subject. With so many choices, I would love to hear from you, please tell me about your favorite blog and why?

The following list provided by Greenedia provide links to popular environmental subtopics:

All Blogs | Alternative Energy | Batteries | Biodiesel | Biofuels | Carbon |Cleantech | Conservation | Electric Vehicles | Energy Efficiency | Energy Policy | Energy Prices | Environmental Economics | Environmentalism | Ethanol | Fuel Cells | Geothermal Energy | Global Warming & Climate Change | Green Asia | Green Building | Green Business | Green Canada | Green Europe | Green Politics | Green Venture Capital | Hybrid Cars & Trucks | Hydro Energy | Incentives & Rebates | LEED Building | Nuclear Energy | Peak Oil |Renewable Energy | Research and Studies | Solar Energy | Stocks & Investing |Sustainable Development | Wave and Tidal Power | Wind Energy.

My Green LogoI am providing a link to a cool environmental blog and website which are combined as an initiative of the Montgomery County, MD, Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).  This blog is supported by several County departments and agencies. The website and blog help County residents find local programs, services, resources and answers to en environmental questions in one place. It is written by Maryland’s Montgomery County Government.

The following list below provides other worthy blogs which cover a broad range of select environmental topics  (I am sure there are more, please let me know if you have some you like):

  1.  HuffPost Green,  has  bolstered its editorial staff and original content
  2. Time’sEcocentric, does a good job covering business and energy
  3. RealClimate’s commentary, a blog written by working climate scientists
  4. Civil Eats, if food is your thing
  5. Streetsblog, which covers transportation and planning
  6.  Grist
  7. Treehugger
  8. OnEarth Blog
  9. The Guardian: Environment Blog
  10. Discovery News: Earth
  11. High Country News: The Goat
  12. The Cleanest Line
  13. The New York Times: Dot Earth
  14. Mother Jones: Blue Marble
  15. Yale Environment 360
  16. The New York Times: Green

There are also blogs by media type and even blogs comprised of videos which are called vlogs.  And, blogs comprising of just links is called a linklog, a site containing a portfolio of sketches is called a sketchblog or one comprising photos is called a photoblog.  There are blogs with shorter posts and mixed media types are called tumblelogs.  And least but not last, there are blogs which are written on typewriters and then scanned which are called typecast or typecast blogs; see typecasting (blogging).

There is also a rare type of blog hosted on the Gopher Protocol is known as a Phlog.

Blogs can also be defined by which type of device is used to compose it.  For example, a blog written by a mobile device like a mobile phone or PDA or moblog.  One early blog was a Wearable Wireless Webcam, an online shared diary of a person’s personal life combining text, video, and pictures transmitted live from a wearable computer and EyeTap device to a web site. This practice of semi-automated blogging with live video together with text was referred to as sousveillance.  Such journals have been used as evidence in legal matters.

Reverse blogs

A Reverse Blog is composed by its users rather than a single blogger. This system has the characteristics of a blog, and the writing of several authors. These can be written by several contributing authors on a topic, or opened up for anyone to write.

If you are looking for more information and resources try some of the links below?

  1. More about the history of blogging in greater detail on Wikipedia.
  2. Check out the opensource resources at wikimatrix.org
  3. Technorati’s Top 100 blogs to keep up
  4. Blog Search Engines:

Directly below are 13 free blog sites to checkout if you are thinking about starting your own blog. And finally, below the list of the 13 free blogs,  is a much longer list of about 200 blog sites and blogging platforms. I have left out the URL links to these, so you will need to just copy and paste any that interest you into your Internet browser.

1) LiveJournal
2) Busy Thumbs
3) WordPress
4) Tublr
5) Blogger
6) Edublogs
7) Open Diary
8) TravelPod
9) Posterous
10) Weebly
11) On sugar
12) Text Pattern
13) Serendipity

And, finally here is a list of some 220+ Blogging Platforms:

  1. Typepad.com
  2. Blog.com
  3. Yahoo 360 // Service Discontinued
  4. Freevlog.org
  5. Multiply.com
  6. Windows Live Spaces // Service Discontinued
  7. Xanga.com
  8. Netcipia.com
  9. Weebly.com
  10. Soulcast.com
  11. Journalfen.net
  12. Blogabond.com
  13. Blogs.bigadda.com // Indian Service
  14. Blog.co.in // Indian Service
  15. Perfspot.com // Indian Service
  16. Blogs.rediff.com
  17. Hubpages.com
  18. Opera Community
  19. vox.com
  20. 9rules.com
  21. newsisfree.com
  22. peopleconnection.aol.com
  23. members.freewebs.com
  24. bravenet.com
  25. angelfire.lycos.com
  26. boingboing.net
  27. snap.com
  28. squarespace.com
  29. diaryland.com
  30. blog-city.com
  31. zefrank.com
  32. antville.org
  33. blogher.org
  34. blogrankings.com
  35. textamerica.com
  36. weblogs.us
  37. bloghub.com
  38. portal.eatonweb.com
  39. blogsearchengine.com
  40. blogowogo.com
  41. bloghi.comweblogger.com
  42. blogrox.com
  43. inknoise.com
  44. bloggar.cjb.net
  45. blogsome.com
  46. salon.com/blog
  47. fotopages.com
  48. blogdrive.com
  49. twoday.net
  50. blogspirit.com/en
  51. jaiku.com
  52. blogs.botw.org
  53. weebly.com
  54. ziki.com
  55. alivedirectory.com
  56. blogger.de
  57. pitas.com
  58. blog.co.uk
  59. insanejournal.com
  60. blogharbor.com
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