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Posts Tagged ‘Journalism’

The Penny Press in France & Le Petite Journal Illustre

April 24, 2012 5 comments

Image

It has been unseasonably cold and rainy the past couple of days, so I thought I would tackle a little history project I have wanted to write about regarding a particular little penny press newspaper.  

As of January 2012, The New York Times raised its daily price to $2.50! Think back to the penny press at the turn of the last century, have you ever wondered what such a paper would cost today, inflation adjusted? Answer: a quarter (Source Article: (Jeff Jarvis). The picture to the left is a copy of an original penny press newspaper which I own and bought in the south of France, in 1994.   I had just completed my public relations degree and was studying the French language in Aix-en Provence.  At the time, I considered not bringing the two antique newspapers with me because I and my two children were carrying backpacks and only one small rolling bag. I was afraid of damaging it on the flight back to the United States. I am so glad that I chose to hand carry it and it survived.

In the 1880′s, this newspaper only cost a penny! The original historic art print alone is priceless, in my humble opinion. Journalism has been a career thread which has run in our family, but I did not know that when I started my course work.  I only learned of it later from my father once I began taking journalism courses during the second year during my undergraduate work.   My grandmother, Edith Faulstich was a Philatelic journalist.  Below is a short list regarding some of her writing history:

1)‘Newark Sunday News’ for 26 year (Nov. 24, 1946–1972)
2)‘The Record”, Hackensack, New Jersey ( 1961–1966)
3) ‘Bergen Evening Record” (January 16, 1922 -Sept 14, 1968)

Faulstich was also editor of: (see publication source addresses here)
4) ‘Postal History Journal’ from May 1957 (Vol.1. No.1) to 1967
5) ‘Western Stamp Collector’
6)‘Covers’, and
7)‘The Essay-Proof Journal’

But, I digress a bit. As this is post is about this specific Penny Press newspaper from France.

The ” Little Diary “is one of the oldest newspapers in France. It began publication in 1863 and the creation should be considered as one of the events most deeply embedded into the life of Parisians of yesteryear. In the history of the press, that is more that a mere episode, that is the memorable date of a revolution, not only in journalism but in social manners.

The present generation can not imagine what newspaper industry was like before the appearance of the five cent newspaper. This popular newspaper brought it within the reach of every budget in France.  But, it was also during a time when the press did not enjoy any freedom of the Press.

Legislators had made it suspicious  and was newspapers were relegated extensively.  The Government of the day placed heavy bonds; censorship, jealous watching  of publishers -very closely, and with the slightest hint of criticism, the slightest allusion to political bashing, heavy fines fell upon the publisher as thick as hail; to recidivism, that was the prohibition of the times. The prohibition of free speech, in France.

As a result it is enough to say that the masses of people, workers, employees, petty bourgeois were condemned not to read newspapers. The wealthy themselves are looked at twice before they subscribed to a newspaper. Some would only read the newspaper reading room, on the others’ subscriptions when they heard of their neighbors  taking out a subscription to one of the largest newspapers of Paris.

Millaud had, by way of creating the Little Diary, other intentions. Rather, to give each person an every day look at life, an echo of national life: information, news story, inspired by the chronic current events, talks about the theater, variety, novels, but no politics! The Government Policy, that was then certain death. And news had to live. The Diary lived indeed.

~ Jean Lecocq. (Almanac 1940)

Le Petit Journal (Journal was sold for a penny: 5 centimes) on 1-2-1863 was created by Moses (said Polydore) Millaud, non-political and therefore not stamped, at half-size, consisting originally of four pages, eight pages as of 1898 and six in 1901.

The aim was to attract the maximum number of subscriptions and to attract advertising. The dominant strategy was to sell at the lowest possible price. In 1863, Moses Polydore Millaud widely publicized “Le Petit Journal” and is the first French newspaper whose strategy was to create access based on the sensational. The selling price was also low in order to make it a popular newspaper, for everyone.

For failing to pay the stamp (5 cents per issue) that made the business impossible, the newspaper was apolitical. The authorities of the Second Empire favored the development of this cheap sheet and its competitors.

After September 4, 1870, with the stamp removed, Le Petit Journal was able to talk politics.

Despite some crises – in 1870, more than 400,000 copies were sold, and in 1892, one million copies.

Girardin took control in 1873. In 1937, it drew more than 150,000 copies when it became the organ of the Social français.

Replié in Clermont-Ferrand in June 1940, Le Petit Journal lived, poorly, until 1944, during which time he/it received a monthly grant from the Vichy government. Schedules of weekly publications, the most famous was his Supplement illustrated in color, whose images offered a picturesque example of the sights and popular ideology of the century.

The success of this penny newspaper caused a surge in a new type of periodicals (eg the Petit Parisien. Le Petit Parisien founded by Louis Andrieux, 1879, the first No. 16-10-1870.

The press has, throughout of 19 th century, evolved according to its industries and new technical possibilities. After the 1881 Act and during the 1890s, the press was still characterized by diversity, each with its French newspaper owner.

At the end of the century, the ground was laid, for the crisis that will soon shake the country: newspapers become a real power of the people.

Printed on the rotary machine chrono-type Marinoni

The Diary, in those heroic days, had not his print to it. No one knew yet that a single printing process: the draw that flat n ‘impressed that a copy of four pages at once and, because of the slowness s’ did the work, inevitably it restricted the paper’s circulation. Readers soon answered so many of the calls, that the printing Serrière declared himself unable to drasw enough alone.

It was therefore necessary to provide for the best merchants at the time, and use multiple printers. However, printing at that time, was not a free industry. We had to open one, buy a patent, and patents, whose numbers were limited, were in the hands of the printers who guarded them jealously and shared customers by various specialties: Books, newspapers, catalogs, paperwork , etc.. Newspaper printing was grouped around the Grange-boat-and growing. One of the busiest was the printing Schiller, 10 and 11, Faubourg Montmartre: it was responsible for some of the copies of Diary.

The First Rotary Press

Hippolyte Marinoni could have been, in the words then of a spiritual writer, “a romantic hero for his own newspaper” The son of a policeman of Corsican origin, he had in his childhood, kept cattle. And, he was far from being ashamed of his humble origin. Marinoni was a laborer in a factory of hand presses and type-founder.

Finally, in 1872, he realized the extraordinary invention of the rotary press with automatic feeder and continuous paper, regularly pulling 40,000 copies per hour. Some years after, he built the great Marinoni rotary multicolor printing press, which churned out 20,000 copies from a single shot in six colors, which were printed as illustrated publications, succédanées of Petite Journal, including the  Illustrated Diary , which were hand drawn, once a week, and printed up to twelve hundred thousand copies.

History of How the “Little Illustrated Journal” was Published

(Imperfectly Translated from French).  The Department of this newspaper asked its readers to stay in close communion and this wish was fulfilled for a longtime as a result of the huge number of letters received,  offering approval and very sincere encouragement. Therefore, we thought it would be nice to keep the paper alive, showing a little of thier lives, and the succession of different yet consistent efforts, necessary for the manufacture of a newspaper, and to penetrate deep Behind the Scenes – dare I say – of a large illustrated weekly like ours. 

 Here, as elsewhere, the division of labor was required. Above all, who is the Director, based on experience and knowledge to satisfy the public, giving directions to follow and supervise its execution. Under him, the writing service, editor, general secretary, implements and oversaw that her designs are shown.  Thus, each week, the Director took care of the editorial materials, which would form the number for the following week. These materials were of two kinds: first, what is known in terms of the business, the “copy”, that is to say, articles and stories, then the illustrations, including drawings and photographs. 

It was very delicate work back then, not only because it had to please the greatest number of readers, because everyone did not have the same tastes, but also because it had to be interesting to follow the news. News was and still is fleeting. What is interesting one day may no longer be the week after. But the manufacture of a weekly is infinitely longer than a day. We may at any time be too late. 

The materials were gathered into the hands of the editor. It then went immediately to the internal executing agencies.  The “copy” first, was sent to he service composition without review. Previously, they couldn’t  ignore it, because they knew that the composition of type had to be done by hand. The characters, distributed into the type compartments with lead  “breaks”, for each and every line of news which was laid out one by one, all by hand by a worker who formed lines. It was very time consuming labor.

 “Today”, much has been simplified and enables this work to be completed by using machines called linotypes. These have a linotype keyboard not unlike that of typewriters. Just to the operator – which is often an operator – to press each key on the keyboard so that the matrix of the corresponding letter comes down in a compartment intended for receiving. When the line is complete, a single shot lever activates the machine. The set of matrices is shown in the orifice of a home with molten lead. The result is a small tablet which bears on one of its edges, the embossed characters of the entire line. Matrices are automatically removed and distributed into the store from which they emerge, again, then the operator presses the corresponding key. 

Just as there were typists more skillful than others, there were also more skilled operators. On average, a good operator dialed 6,000 letters, 150 lines per hour. 

 The picture to the left is titled” Component of youth operators for creating   newspaper articles sitting at the linotype machine”

When an entire article or a story was composed, we made a test by passing over the surface of the thick ink, and then laying on top of it a sheet of paper and hitting it with a big brush. The test thus obtained wass assigned to a grader, who read the test “copy” and pointed out errors in the composition. Errors were corrected to the linotype by redoing the entire line.
Only the titles were still made with movable type, one by one by hand. It was the beginning of the use of making specialized headlines.

***

Meanwhile, the illustrations are processed by the photo etching. The illustrations were created in black ink and photographs are reproduced by a process, common in those days, whose origins date back to Talbot’s invention in 1852 . 

For the longest time, it’ is true that we only knew of the woodcut pictures which were only created and obtained by arduous manual labor from an artist, sculpting virtually on a board of boxwood and engraving it, chiseling the art worked well.  Thanks to an ingenious use of photography, they mechanically reproduced art on zinc or copper plates for the illustrations for the newspaper. 

The process is similar, though more delicate and complicated for large color compositions, which were located on the first and last page of the Illustrated Diary. Note, however, we had a need to get as many pictures as there were colors in the universe. For black, blue, yellow and red, that’s four shots that would be later set on the press and on which turned the white paper into colorful art.  Four colors, you say! But there were more than four colors in the prints that illustrated the newspaper? No doubt, but the green is obtained by superposition of blue and yellow and other colors by layering the same kind.

***

And they met the “copy” and illustrations clichés. Then begins the work of layout.  This job runs on large tables that, for a very old tradition, we continue to call “home plate”. Under the supervision of Secretary of writing which indicates the position of articles and photographs, these are arranged in forms or large cast iron frames that tightly clasp. When this work is completed, it is, the content of each form, a race named special “morass.” The morasses are revised by the corrector, which seeks to track the latest faults are forgotten or layout errors.Then the editor examines in turn and, if it has no comment to make, given the right to shoot.

If we drew on hardware platforms, we could immediately bring these forms to the printer. But everyone knows that more these days, are used for rotating the huge prints of the great modern newspapers. Transformative work is still needed. He runs to the stereotype.  There, introduced forms are placed in a special machine that molds them on a print taken by a kind of wide paper carton hurry. This blank, it curves to give the exact shape corresponding to the rotating rollers. Finally, each blank, and curved, is used to make one or more curved, and it is these images, the result of a sequence of transformations, which will finally get the newspaper.

The stereotype where the forms are used to make cylindrical clichés, is noted to the right. Now, this is the last part of whee the job execution begins on one of those admirable rotating machines in which the invention is due to Hippolyte Marinoni, both creator of modern printing and for many years director of the Petit Journal.

Under the orders of the chief driver, snapshots from the stereotype are set on the rollers of the machine and the big roll of paper begins to unfold its leaves through the endless maze of wheels, connecting rods and countless bodies of steel.

Despite the appearance, start-up demand meticulous care. Because of the four different inks used for color prints, you must engage in a very delicate work of identification. We must also adjust the pressure on the plates and the arrival of the inks so that the text is neither too gray or too dark. Finally everything is ready, after many hours of experience and tests. The great “roto” starts to devour the paper at full speed and make it in the form of copies printed, folded, cut, such that we can finally see, a few days later, in depositories and in newsagents all over France.
It will be appreciated by comparing two numbers, the benefits of rotary flat on the machine, it once drew an average of 2,000 sheets per day. The rotary Illustrated Diary , though less rapid than that of a newspaper, printed only in black, delivers 10,000 copies per hour. - R

The presses were used every week to get the ‘Petit Journal Illustrated and printed for circulation”  

Thanks for reading about the history of this newspaper from 1894. If you have any tidbits of history to add or comments about the paper, or the history of the penny press I would welcome insights and additional information.

Now, onto finding out the history of my other little French newspaper printed March 1891, Le Soleil du Dimanche, all 16 pages!

All Things Twitterfied

April 23, 2012 3 comments

I  believe this is the best, most complete and accurate list of valuable Twitter applications available on the internet, which I am re-blogging, with many thanks, to Eric Goldstein.  I hope it is useful to others!

To be fair, I absolutely have merged and plagiarized other older and outdated lists that I found (the larger ones are credited below).  However, I spent a good deal of time cleaning out the dead applications, I will try and update this list over time, but you can be assured that as of May, 2011, every site on this list has been tested and is up and running (or tagged as being in beta/alpha).  I don’t guarantee that the apps all work, but the sites were definitely up and running.  Please e-mail me or add a comment with any new apps or corrections you find that you’d like me to add.

Simple Web Based Clients and Twitter Viewing Tools

  1. Twitter.com (*):  Can’t go wrong with this — web, iPhone, etc.
  2. Twalala: On-line browser beta Twitter tool that allows you to filter out / mute tweets you wish to ignore.
  3. Hahlo: Another good web based and iPhone optimized site where you can view tweets and tweet.
  4. iTweet:  Similar to Hahlo – auto updates.
  5. TwitStat: Mobile web client (supposedly has analytics, but I didn’t see it)
  6. Dabr.co.uk : Another mobile web client
  7. Splitweet:  allows multi account Twitter management.
  8. Twimbow:  In alpha, but seems like an interesting web based browser if you can get an account.
  9. TweetVisor:  Interesting new activity based web twitter client
  10. Twazzup Reader:  Good web based Twitter Client
  11. Accessible Twitter:  Twitter UI optimized for disabled users and intended to be easier to read.
  12. Qwitter Client:  Accessible Twitter client designed for access by the blind via a user’s screen reader.

Directory And Top User Search Tools

  1. Just Tweet It: A twitter directory sorted by interest 
  2. Twitaholic: Similar to WeFollow – Lists top 1000 Twitter Users by followers.
  3. FameCount:  Active users on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube
  4. Twitrank: List of top 150 Twitter Users By Followers, People They’re Following, and updates 
  5. Twellow (*): The Twitter Yellow Pages — Find people by area of expertise. 
  6. We Follow: Find celebrities and follow-up people and key areas of expertise.
  7. Tweetfind:  Twitter Directory with Social Listings, Twitter Lists & Tools
  8. TwitterPacks : Answers the question: If someone were joining Twitter today, who might they follow?
  9. Start4all:   Directory of Twitter related web pages
  10. FollowerWonk:  Search Twitter Profiles By Keywords / Sentences.  Can compare two users as well for overlap
  11. Twiends:  Tool to grow your Twitter / Facebook / YouTube following by trading likes.
  12. Fan Page List: Social media directory of Twitter & Facebook Brands / Celebrities / etc.
  13. Increasr: Very similar to Twiends, a Twitter follower tool
  14. FollowFriday.com:  Ranking of the most recommended Tweeps
  15. FriendLynx:   Find Your Facebook Friends On Twitter
  16. FilterTweeps:  Advanced Tweeps Search Engine
  17. Resonances:  Influential Tweeps Directory
  18. Local Follow: Tweeps Search Engine

Track The Latest Trends and Tags

  1. Hashtags (uses Trendistic data): Shows graphical 7 day trend on keywords and names of people that used that keyword.
  2. Serendipitwiterrous: Search for tweets of a certain person using certain keywords
  3. Trendistic (*): See trends in Twitter – trending tags, 24 hour, 7/30/90/180 day graphs 
  4. Twitscoop: See key trends and events on Twitter — post Tweets in response.
  5. TwitLinks:  The latest links from the worlds top tech twitter users.
  6. Tweet Scan: Show top and search keywords.
  7. Tweetmeme (*): Good site to see the latest and hottest stories / images.
  8. Twemes: Worldwide tags & Trends (Twemes)
  9. Monitter:  Twitter monitor which watches up to 3 keywords in separate columns in real time.
  10. Twistori: Quirky live stream of Tweets showing loves, hates, believes, wishes, etc.
  11. Twitturls: Find out the latest URLs posted on Twitter
  12. Twitturly: Similar to Tweetmeme – latest and hottest stories / images.
  13. Twendz:   Explores Twitter Conversations and Sentiment
  14. Topsy:  Real Time Search For Twitter
  15. Sulia:  The Interest Network – See top headlines.
  16. Favstar: Favorite funny tweets
  17. Twazzup:  Realtime search results from Twitter
  18. hashMASH: Finds and sorts similar hashtags based upon activity
  19. SearchHash: Download range of tweets based upon hashtag
  20. Hashtagify.me:  Explore Twitter Hashtags and their relationships

Segmentation and List Grouping Tools

  1. Formulists (*):  An excellent app that will help built personal lists for you based upon certain criteria / keywords.
  2. Group Tweet: Tweet with only a particular group of people 
  3. Crowd Status: Create and find out the status of a certain group of people on Twitter 
  4. Twitter Groups: Tag your followers into different groups.  Send a message to the entire group at once.
  5. Triberr:  Interesting site that will retweet everything in the groups you join.

Twitter Utilities

  1. bit.ly (*):  The King URL shortener – many twitter apps use bit.ly directly or can leverage their bookmarklets
  2. Ping.fm (*): Extremely valuable service that lets you publish your updates to many social networks at one time.
  3. Visibli: Nice engagement bar that shows your brand above links you share.   Also has analytics.
  4. Tweet Burner: Track the links that you post on Twitter – URL Shortner
  5. Twitter Split: Interesting script / tool you can install to allow you to track links in tweets you post.
  6. TrueTwit (F/$):  A Twitter validation tool that helps automate some key services.   Free and paid services are useful.
  7. Twit Longer:   Allows you to send longer Tweets
  8. Twitter Keys: Blog Post & Bookmarklet with little icons & images you can add into your tweets.
  9. Mokumax:   Nice free app to schedule branded tweets
  10. TwimeMachine:  Way to see all your past Tweets
  11. Follow Friday Helper (*):  Let’s you easily build thank you & other messages to people who mention, RT, etc. you.

Integrate Twitter with Files, Images and Videos

  1. Twitpic (*): Share photos
  2. Twitvid (*):  Share photos and videos
  3. Autopostr: Update your Twitter when you post a Flickr picture – In Beta, no invites available.
  4. Twixr: Share pictures on Twitter via your mobile phone
  5. Twixxer: Share photos and videos on Twitter
  6. MobyPictures:  Share your images across multiple sites including Twitter

Twitter Background Sites

  1. Twilk ($) (*):  Cool site that Create a background image of all your followers / who you follow.  Paid takes out advertising
  2. Twitrounds:   Another Free Twitter Background Tool
  3. TwitbacksCreate free twitter backgrounds.
  4. Free Twitter Designer  : Free Tool To Design a Twitter Background
  5. Twitter Images:  More free images
  6. Twitter Backgrounds.org:   MORE free images
  7. Twit Background Images.com:  MORE
  8. Twitr Backgrounds:  and more.
  9. Twitpaper:  More.
  10. Free Twitter Layout:  oh, and more
  11. Tweativity: Windows based app for Twitter backgrounds.

Summarized Reports / Digests Of Social Activity

  1. Gist (*):  A great app that tracks activity and tweets for your contacts across all social platforms.   Integration with Outlook, iPhone, Android, and more.   Definitely worth a look.
  2. Nutshell Mail:  Delivers a nice daily e-mail report of your Twitter, Facebook, and Social Media Activity.
  3. Twilert (*):   A good free app that will provide a daily digest of tweets via e-mail of search terms & people
  4. Tweet Beep ($): Keep track of conversations that mention you, your products, your company, anything, with hourly updates via keyword tracking.
  5. Stream Spigot: Creates a digest of tweets for a person or list delivered via RSS or a web page you can visit daily.
  6. Social Oomph  (*): This is also listed below as a paid app, but the free version gives you a nice daily summary of Twitter Activity by keyword / user.
  7. ChiliTweets ($):  Finds “hot” links and tweets and aggregates them for you

Cool Ways To See Your Tweets And Followers

  1. TwitterFountain (*):  Very cool way to view tweets by person/ keyword in real time on big screen (trade shows & events).
  2. TwitterCamp Nice way to view tweets on a big screen or monitor
  3. Twit100: Provides a unique view of the last 100 tweets from your followers.
  4. TwitArcs: Interesting visualization tool to see how a user’s tweets are connected
  5. Twitter Spectrum: Visualization tool that shows how two keywords are connected via Twitter keywords.
  6. TwitterBrowser:  Lets you browse ones friends graphically.
  7. Twitterfall:  An interesting real time browser of Twitter activity by keyword / user / etc.
  8. Twylah: An on-lin Flipboard type view of your Tweets.   In Request only Beta – Here is mine.
  9. MentionMap:  Very interesting “mindmap” type view of mentions by username.

Follower / Unfollower Tools

  1. Does Follow: Simple tool to see if one person follows another person.
  2. Manage Flitter ($):  Clean up and manage your followers.  Also has some analytic stuff.
  3. Tweeter Karma: See who you are following that is not following you and visa versa.   Can mass follow those you don’t follow.
  4. Qwitter ($): Get a daily report showing unfollowers.   (I could not get this to deliver info to me)
  5. Twerp Scan: Interesting way to drill down into who you or your followers are following.
  6. Twitspam: Track and Report Twitter / Social Network spammers
  7. Is Now Following:  Tracks when you add new followers and tweets it
  8. Fllwrs:  Keep track of your followers / Unfollowers
  9. Twitoria:  Shows activity of the people you’re following to stop if they haven’t tweeted in a while.
  10. FollowCost:  What’s it “cost” to follow someone (how frequently do they update / tweet)?
  11. Just Unfollow:   Unfollow those that are not following you.
  12. IsFollow:  Find out who is following who by entering in two usernames.
  13. Tweet Find Tools:  Good free tool to unfollow people that don’t follow you.  Also has tweet scheduler
  14. Friend or Follow:  Another app to see who doesn’t follow you and visa versa.
  15. Tweepi: Another list cleanser
  16. Who Unfollowed Me: Find out who unfollowed you.

Twitter Account Analysis tools

  1. TwentyFeet (F/$) (*):  Excellent summary of stats across multiple sites.   First Twitter & Facebook account are free.
  2. Klout (*):  An excellent app to track and rate your social media activities (Facebook & Twitter, LinkedIn to follow).
  3. Empire Avenue:  Similar to Klout – only more complicated with a “virtual investment game” built in.
  4. Crowd Booster:  Another good analytic tool
  5. Peer Index:  Another good analytic tool
  6. My Tweeple ($): Twitter Account Evaluation Tool.  Follower counts, ratios, tweet counts.  Review Recent Tweets (See what your followers are saying), Follow-back, hide or block new followers.  Create Tags, Notes, and Share.  Good tool to export your entire follower list to a csv file.
  7. Twitter Counter: Good Twitter Analytics / Comparison & Statistic Tool.  Also has some good blog scripts and Twitter Tools
  8. Twitter Grader: Analyses your Twitter account on a 0-100 score. Computed based on how complete your profile is as well as the number and influence of your followers.  Also shows top users in categories.  Good basic stats.
  9. Tweet Stats: Graphical representation of your Twitter activity including time of day posting, interface used, etc.
  10. Tweeple Twak (in alpha): Supposedly track your friend gains and declines.  Site is up, but can’t see what it does.
  11. Twit Graph: Similar to TweetStats, but weaker and has more advertising
  12. Twoolr:  Another Twitter Analytic Tool
  13. Twitter Ratio: Find out your friend to follower ratio.
  14. Retweet Rank:  Provides a ranking on the number of Retweets You Have
  15. See Tweeb and SocialDash Under the iPhone Apps section for a few good iPhone Apps that provide statistics
  16. The Social List:  Ranking Tool to compare yourself to others via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and 4sq
  17. SocialBro:  A very interesting new desktop app to look at Twitter Statistics – in Beta, but very cool.

Business Social / Twitter Suites & Tools

  1. MessageMaker ($$) (**):  A shameless plug for my company’s (One To One Global) product that is designed for organizations and companies to deliver messages to tens, hundreds, or thousands of social endpoints (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and then provide amazing aggregated reporting.  Fantastic for companies with multiple brands, franchises, and organizations looking to leverage their sales team’s or employees.  Contact me if you’re interested in learning more.
  2. Pluggio ($) (**):  One of my favorite personal apps to help find valuable content, schedule tweets, and get reports on your activity.   Free version is ok, paid version is justified.
  3. Tweet Adder ($) (**):  PC & Mac tool to help build a targeted list of followers and un-follow those those that don’t follow you back.   Sends thank you messages to new followers.   On my must have list.
  4. NEW: Tweet Attack ($) (*) :  Similar to Tweet Adder, but seems like it brings some new things to the table.   I included a discount link I found.
  5. Tweet Whistle ($):  Similar to Tweet Adder as well.  Mac and PC version to build your followers.
  6. Twittenator ($):  Similar to Tweet Adder.   Seems solid, I’ve just become used to the other.
  7. Sprout Social (F/$) (*):  Easy to use dashboard to manage your social efforts with attractive analytics.
  8. Social Oomph ($$) (*): A complete Twitter Automation and Analytic Tool.   Free version also very valuable for keyword analysis reports, follow backs, and reporting.
  9. Timely:  An interesting app that analyzes and schedules Tweets based upon the best time to deliver them
  10. Tweetag: Browse tweets via tags and receive e-mail notifications.
  11. Tap11 ($):  Real-Time Intelligence and Engagement Platform for Twitter & Facebook
  12. Twaitter ($):  Social Media Suite handling scheduling of tweets, statistics, other info.
  13. Twollo ($):  Targeted follower building tool based on keywords with auto-follow
  14. BufferApp ($):   Similar to Pluggio in that you can build a targeted list of tweets that it will intelligently deliver over the course of the day.
  15. Radian6 ($$):  Very valuable monitoring and Analytic Tool
  16. TweetBig ($):   Another good suite with auto follow-back, tweet scheduling, analytics, and other stuff.
  17. CoTweet (F/$):  Tool to help empower teams to monitor and engage with customers across multiple accounts
  18. Mutual Mind.com ($):  An enterprise level social media management platform
  19. TweetSpinner (F/$):  Manages followers, rotates profiles, archives and schedules tweets.
  20. TweetBot / Tweet Scope:   Similar to Tweet Adder – with auto unfollow and DM capabilities.

Twitter Integration With Your Site or Blog

  1. Add Tweets: Make Twitter Update Widgets for site or blog using javascript 
  2. Feed Tweeter: integrate Twitter with Plurk, your blog and delicious
  3. Follow Me On Twitter Buttons: Follow me on twitter buttons
  4. Loudtwitter: Ships your tweets to your blog.
  5. PingTwitter: Automatically update your Twitter Account when you publish a new blog pos
  6. Siah Design: Free Twitter buttons and animated GIFs you can use.
  7. Stammy’s RSS To Twitter: Not too many people have access to a Ruby-enabled server so the author decided to make a simple PHP script to get the job done.
  8.  Twignature: A decent translated Japanese app to take your username and create a usable Twitter signature for websites & e-mail.
  9. Twit This: Add this option so people can easily tweet information from your site or blog
  10. Twitter Tools: A wordpress plugin that lets you integrate Twitter with your blog. You can send your updates to your blog as well as create tweets directly from your blog
  11. Twitter for WordPress: Script displays latest tweets on your blog
  12. Twitterfeed: Post your blog to Twitter through your RSS feed
  13. Twitter Updater: Automatically sends a Twitter status update to your Twitter account when you create, publish, or edit your WordPress post
  14. Twitter WordPress Sidebar Widget: A wordpress widget where you can send your tweets to your blog
  15. TwitGIF: A translated Japanese app that creates an animated GIF from your latest Tweets.
  16. Chirrup:  PHP Script that allows you to collect Twitter comments for your site.
  17. Dlvr.it:   Deliver Your Blog To Twitter, Facebook, and More
  18. DiggDigg:  One of many WordPress plugins that integrate social sites.

Twitter As An Organizer

  1. Remember the Milk: Manage tasks on Twitter as well as set notifications for yourself
  2. Twittercal: Integrate your Google Calendar with Twitter
  3. My Chores: Track your chores
  4. Planypus: Make plans and export them to Twitter

Polls and Surveys on Twitter

  1. Lazy Tweet: Find answers to your questions by posting “@lazyweb” or “@lazytweet”
  2. Twitter Answers: Another question site with a nice layout so you can easily get answers to your questions.
  3. Twitter Polldaddy ($): A complete poll and survey site that also offers Twitter Options.
  4. Twittpoll: Join some twitter polls and receive the results in 24 hours

Twitter Advertising Networks

  1. Twittad: Place advertisements on your profile
  2. Magpie: Advertise with 5 tweets and get paid
  3. TwitCash:  Scheme to make money on twitter

Twitter and Music

  1. Twittytunes / FoxyTunes: Tweet what you’re listening, watching or reading regardless what player you are using. 
  2. Blip.fm: Listen to music and tweet it to Twitter

Twitter Backup Utilities

  1. Tweetake (*): Backup your twitter account
  2. Twitter Safe: Another place where you can backup your account.
  3. Tweet Scan Backup:   Backs up your Twitter Info

Adobe Air Clients and Multi-Platform Clients

  1. Snitter 
  2. TweetDeck (*) : One of the best out there, free and definitely worth a look
  3. TweetPad visualizes statistics on the source of the incoming messages.
  4. Twhirl
  5. Twinja
  6. Pwytter
  7. Destroy Twitter

Twitter Tools For Mac

There are a million of these, so I’ll just list a few of the ones I use in addition to TweetDeck, Twitter, and Echofon that were mentioned elsewhere.   Open the Apple App Store and search for Twitter to find many more.

  1. Twitterrific:  ($) Paid Mac Client.
  2. YoruFukurou:   A good free app with multi-account support.
  3. Socialite ($):  Very powerful, not cheap ($19.99), but solid app that I got with a bundle one time.
  4. Twidget: A mac dashboard widget.
  5. Twittereeze is an extension to Twitterific. It allows you to set your iChat, Skype, Adium status to your twitter status.

Twitter Firefox & Other Plugins

  1. TweetStalk: A firefox addon that allows you to follow / stalk people without them knowing it.
  2. Hootbar (*): Formerlly Twitterbar, powerful way to post messages from address bar
  3.  Twitbin: A Firefox extension that allows you to post and receive tweets via the Sidebin.
  4. TwitterFox:  Sits in the status bar of Firefox. Send updates and keep an eye on your friends.
  5. Echofon For Firefox (*):  Another sidebin extension
  6. TwitterLine: A Headline Toolbar for Firefox
  7. Yoono (*): Supports updates to Twitter Facebook LinkedIn YouTube GTalk AIM
  8. Shareaholic (*): Share webpages with your friends on Twitter. Can be integrated with your Firefox Browser
  9. iTwitter: iGoogle gadget that have ping.fm, twitter videos, twitter news, twitter tips, twitter tools and more.

IPhone Apps

There are a million iPhone Twitter Apps, but here are a few of the ones I have and use.

  1. Tweetlogix ($) (*):  My favorite Iphone App – easy to manage multiple accounts, etc.
  2. Echofon (F/$) (*) : My second favorite
  3. qTweeter ($) (*):  Got to have a jailbroken iPhone, but an awesome app to quickly pull up an app and tweet images, video, location, etc.  Available via Cydia.
  4. Tweetdeck (*):  Along with Hootsuite, one of the most popular apps used today.
  5. Seesmic:  Nice app that allows you to easily log on to multiple Twitter, Facebook accounts.
  6. Hootsuite (*): One of the most popular tools out there.
  7. Boxcar: Good app that does push notifications for multiple social sites.
  8. Tweet-r 
  9. Twinkle
  10. Twitterific
  11. Twittelator (F/$)
  12. SocialDash (*):  One of the only iPhone Apps that provides access to Facebook and Twitter statistics on things like Klout.
  13. Tweeb:  A good iPhone app that provides Twitter account analysis (Tweets, Buzz, Clicks, etc.)
  14. Ubersocial:  Blackberry, iPhone, and beta Desktop App with great promise.
  15. TweetList:  A good Twitter Client (was recommended for disabled users)
  16. TeeWee:  Another decent free iPhone App recommended by a few.

Non-iPhone Mobile Device Twitter Clients

  1. ceTwit:  A windows mobile twitter client.
  2. JTwitter:  A java twitter client for mobile phones.
  3. Tiny Twitter:  A Java twitter client to send and receive tweets for mobile phones and devices.
  4. Twidroid (*):  An application for android mobiles.
  5. TwitterBerry:  Update and receive Tweets from your BlackBerry.

Windows & Misc.  Clients

  1. Mad Twitter: Built like Twitterific for Windows
  2. Twitterlicious:  Supports proxies, have a read-unread system and auto-refresh mechanism
  3. Twitux: GTK+Twitter Client
  4. Deskbar Twitter:  Update Twitter on Ubuntu
  5. Twippera: Twitter widget for Opera

Mobile Phone Applications With Twitter

  1. Dial2Do ($):  Use your voice to tweet as well as send text and do e-mail
  2. Vlingo ($) (*): iPhone, Android, Nokia, Windows Voice activated app
  3. Qik (*):  Share videos and Tweet (and e-mail) them across MANY phones
  4. Flix Wagon:  Similar to Qik – only for Android.

Integration With E-Mail / Messaging Applications

  1. Yahoo Messenger Twitter Sync Plugin: Integrate twitter with your Yahoo Messenger
  2. TikiTwit: Integrate Twitter with iChat
  3. Twittermail: Part of TwitterCounter – update twitter, send images, and longer tweets via email 
  4. Twinbox: Update Twitter with your Microsoft Outlook
  5. TwitEmail:  Allows twitter users to send HTML emails with attachments

Useless, Funny, & Misc. Twitter Sites

  1. Secret Tweet: Imagine PostSecret + Twitter. Tweet those secrets
  2. Curse Bird: Find out who’s swearing on Twitter
  3. Tweet What You Eat: Tweet what you’re eating at the moment – track your calories and weight
  4. Foodfeed: Similar to Tweet What You Eat, but just the tweet info
  5. Xbox 360 Gamer Tag:  Automatically update twitter with what you are playing at a certain moment
  6. Trackthis: Track your packages via Twitter with this tool
  7. Bkkeeper: Share what you’re reading on Twitter
  8. Commuter Feed: Share tweets on traffic and transit delays
  9. Foamee: Fun way to tracks who you owe coffee or beer to
  10. InnerTwitter: Signals you through chimes where you have to let go of your thoughts.
  11. Post like a Pirate: Talk like a pirate on twitter
  12. Roll the dice:  Give you the power to roll a dice on twitter. Useful when you’re betting or playing games with your friends.
  13. Xpenser:  Track your expenses with twitter
  14. Twithire:  The place where you can tweet job postings
  15. GasCalc: Tracks your gas usage and MPG on Twitter
  16. Fuel Frog ($): iPhone App with Twitter integration that also tracks Gas Usage and uses Twitter.
  17. Deal Tagger:  Shop and share on Twitter
  18. Textgasm: Tweet your secrets
  19. Twitter Nonsense: Daily Twitter Comic Strip
  20. Twitterbox:  A Twitter Client for Second Life
  21. Stocktwits:  Lets you follow stocks on Twitter. 
  22. Twictionary:  A repository for all sorts of words used on Twitter.
  23. TweetValue: Tells you how much your profile is worth in US dollars.
  24. MORE TWITTER GAMES:   I just found this lens on Squidoo that has a fairly up to date list of additional Twitter Games.

Once again, I credit the following posts for providing some of the information I used here. However, these posts are old, have many dead links and are missing many of the best new apps that are out there.

http://www.squidoo.com/twitterapps
http://eonlinetips.com/200-twitter-tools-list-even-your-mom-would-love-it/
Credit to the people on this LinkedIn Thread as well:
What are your favorite Twitter tools? | LinkedIn http://linkd.in/jUu6yX

Now that you have all these tools to use, be sure to follow me @unlimitedpr and continue to read my blog here.

Where to Find Archives of Newspapers (Online)

April 23, 2012 2 comments

 How to Find Old Newspapers Online

With the impending death of paper, U.S. Post Offices and the decline of Newspapers, I have begun performing some preliminary research regarding one of two French newspapers I bought in a little book store in the south of France during my study abroad in 1994. I am beginning with  “Le Soleil du Dimanche.”  It is rather difficult learn anything about the history of this illustrative journal. I came across a list of newspaper resources and thought it might be useful to others. Once I find the scoop on this little 16 pager and Le Petite Journal, both printed in March 1891.

The Most Requested Newspapers

• The Herald Sun  • The London Times  • The NY Times  • NC State Library Newspaper Project                                                      •  The Raleigh News & Observer  • USA Today  • The Wall Street Journal  • The Washington Post

North Carolina Community Newspapers

• NC Community Newspapers • America’s Newspapers: NC

Lists of Online Newspapers Worldwide

  • 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers - Provides full text access to the British Library’s collection of the newspapers, pamphlets, books gathered by Reverend Charles Burney (1757-1817).
  • 19th Century British Library Newspapers Collection - Contains full runs of newspapers specially selected to best represent nineteenth-century Britain.
  • 19th Century U.S. Newspapers - Access to approximately 500 U.S. newspapers, published between 1800 and 1900.
  • Adams Papers Digital Edition - The database comprises John Adams’s complete diaries, selected legal papers, and the ongoing series of family correspondence and state papers.
  • Africa-Wide NiPAD - Provides multi-disciplinary coverage about African including politics, history, economics, business, mining, development, social issues, anthropology, natural history, literature, language, law, music and much more.
  • African American Newspapers - Includes over 200 African-American newspapers, arranged by state.
  • Alternative Press Index - Alternative Press Index Archive (APIA) is a bibliographic database of journal, newspaper, and magazine articles from over 700 international alternative, radical, and left periodicals.
  • America’s Historical Newspapers, 1690-1922 - America’s Historical Newspapers allows users to search U.S. historical papers published between 1690 and 1922, including titles from all 50 states.
  • America’s Newspapers: North Carolina - A quick link to the NC section of America’s Newspapers.
  • Atlanta Constitution (1868-1939) - Offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue.
  • Black Studies Center - Comprised of several cross-searchable component databases, including the International Index to Black Periodicals and historical black newspapers.
  • Canadian Newsstand -  This collection includes 21 national and leading regional newspapers, including: The Globe and Mail, National Post, Montreal Gazette, Ottawa Citizen, etc.
  • Chicago Tribune (1849-1986)
  • Factiva - Provides updated global information and news from major newspapers and business journals.
  • Gallica Project on French Newspapers - Allows access to full text for the following French newspapers: Le Figaro and son supplement litteraireLe TempsLa CroixL’HumaniteLa PresseLe Journal des debatsOuest-Eclair (editions de Rennes, Caen et Nantes).
  • Guardian and The Observer - The Guardian (1821-2003) and its sister paper, The Observer (1791-2003) provide online access to facts, firsthand accounts, and opinions of the day about the most significant and fascinating political, business, sports, literary, and entertainment events from the past 200 years.
  • Illustrated London News Historical Archive - Provides access to the entire run of the Illustrated London News from its first publication on 14 May 1842 to its last in 2003.
  • Informe - Contains the full text of popular magazines, academic journals and selected newspaper articles in Spanish.
  • InfoTrac Newsstand - provides indexing and full-text articles from major U.S. regional, national and local newspapers as well as leading titles from around the world.
  • Kidon Media Link - Newspapers, periodicals and other media sources from around the world.  Every country has its own integrated page.  There are no separate pages for newspapers, magazines, television, radio and news agencies.
  • Latin American Newsstand - Complete contents from over 35 full text Latin American newspaper titles in Spanish and Portuguese, with some additional content in English.  Most coverage starts with 2005, though some go back to 1995.
  • Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe - Provides full text access to a wide range of U.S. and international newspapers, radio and television transcripts.  Covers general, business and legal information sources.  Lexis-Nexis is available for the Duke Community only through this link.
  • Los Angeles Times
  • National Index to Chinese Newspapers & Periodicals - This is an index database of about 18,000 Chinese newspapers and periodicals published 1833-1949.
  • NC Newspapers Online - It includes 23,483 digital images of papers dating from 1752 to the 1890s, including the collection of 18th century newspapers the State Archives has on microfilm.  Included are the North Carolina Gazette (New Bern:  April 14, 1775), various newspapers from Edenton (1787-1801), Fayetteville (1798-1795), Hillsboro (1786), New Bern (1751-1804), and Wilmington (1765-1816).  In addition, the project includes the full run of two politically opposed newspapers from Salisbury, the Carolina Watchman (1832-1898) and The Western Carolinian (1820-1844).  Finally, the project also includes three lesson plans, derived from these newspapers, entitled Idealized Motherhood vs. the Realities of Mother hood in Antebellum North Carolina; Teaching About Slavery Through Newspaper Advertisements; and “A Female Raid” in 1863, or Using Newspaper Coverage to Learn More About North Carolina’s Civil War Home Front.
  • New York Times Book Review Archives - This is a full text archive of book reviews published in the New York Times since 1980.  It covers over 50,000 books and authors, in reviews as well as in news and interviews.  This database is listed on the Book Reviews subject list.
  • News & Observer, 1991-PresentNews & Observer, 2004-Present - NCLive now offers web access to full text articles from the Raleigh News & Observer through a database called InfoTrac Custom Newspapers.  The News & Observer is covered from 1991 to the present.
  • Newspaperindex.com - Newspapers and Front Pages in all countries.
  • Newspaper Source - Contains selected full text articles from over 140 regional U.S. newspapers, several international newspapers, newswires, and the Christian Science Monitor. The emphasis is business-related articles, although articles about national and international news events are also included.
  • North Carolina Periodicals Index - Produced by the Joyner Library at ECU, this free database provides indexing of articles from over 40 periodicals published in NC.  Most of these periodicals are not covered by other indexes or databases.  The Triangle’s “Independent Weekly” is one example.
  • ProQuest Historical Newspapers - New York Times, full text, from 1851 to three years before the current date.
  • ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Black Newspapers - Offers primary source material for the study of American history and African-American culture, history, politics, and the arts.
  • Regional Business News - A collection of business journals, newspapers and news wires covering all metropolitan and rural areas within the U.S.
  • Russian National Bibliography - allows users to digitally search the Russian Book Chamber’s (Knizhnaia palata) national bibliographies for citations from books, newspapers, journals, dissertation abstracts, musical scores, and maps.
  • SRDS Media Solutions - Provides advertising media rates and advertiser data through its coverage of traditional media – such as magazines, newspapers, television, direct marketing, and radio – as well as online sources.
  • Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa - collection consists of more than 180,000 pages of documents and images, including periodicals, nationalist publications, records of colonial government commissions, local newspaper reports, personal papers, correspondence, UN documents, out-of-print and other particularly relevant books, oral testimonies, life histories, and speeches.
  • Taiwan Nichinichi Shinpo - Keyword searching and full text of official newspaper of Taiwan during the Japanese colonial period, including both Japanese (1898.5 – 1944.3) and Chinese (1905.7 – 1911.11) editions.
  • The Times Digital Archive, 1785-1985 - Provides full text access to The Times (London).  The full newspaper (including advertisements and illustrations) is given with full-page or specific article access, along with a facsimile (PDF) version.
  • Times of India - The Times of India (1838-2001) offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue.
  • Universal Database of Central Russian Newspapers - A full-text database of over 40 newspapers from Russia, including some English-language publications. (Visual material like photos, graphs, and drawings are not included.) Accessible in English or Russian.
  • Universal Databases - This interface provides a unified search engine for several of the Eastview Universal databases: Russian Central Newspapers (UDB-COM), Current Digest of the Post-Soviet Press (UDB-CD), Social Sciences & Humanities (UDB-EDU), Voprosy istorii: Complete Collection (UDB-VI), and Voprosy literatury: Complete Collection (UDB-VL).
  • Waterloo Directory of English Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 - A subject-inclusive, language-inclusive bibliography of newspapers and periodicals from Victorian England . Includes 6 alphabetical indexes: Title, Issuing body, People, Town, County, and Subject. Also included are titles in any language, published during any part of their life-span in England between January 1, 1800 and December 31, 1900.
  • World News Connection - A fee-based service of the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) which provides translations by FBIS and JPRS of non-English newspapers, speeches, journals, and some media broadcasts from foreign countries. Translations are added within 24–72 hours of original broadcast/publication, and the database goes back to 2003. Some non-U.S. English-language news sources are also included.
  • World Newspaper Archive - A fully searchable collection of historical newspapers from around the globe.
  • Yomiuri Newspaper, 1986- - Includes full text of Yomiuri shinbun (from Sept. 1986- to the present, with local editions beginning in Dec. 1986); along with the English edition: the Daily Yomiuri (Sept. 1989- to the present), both searchable by article, keyword, subject category, and issue.

List of Journalists Using Twitter

April 23, 2012 21 comments

UPDATED June 11, 2012:

IMPORTANT UPDATE # 1:   I sent a message to MediaOnTwitter & [@prsarahevansas on Twitter] to see if the Twitter media list is still available.  I had it listed here on my original blog post but now, it looks like it has moved or been completely removed.  And, Sarah Evans is now going by the name of Sarah’s Faves as of 2011. I also found that MediaOnTwitter resource has moved!  [And, maybe more than once since my original post]. Seems I can’t find the elusive Media on Twitter list anywhere right now. I will keep trying. The following is the last know information that I could find.

MediaOnTwitter, was powered by TrackVia’s online database, is/was the first shareable media database available to Twitter users. It is/was a free resource and media can be sorted by beat, location, name or media outlet. MediaOnTwitter is populated by Twitter users, vetted by editors and FREE to the entire community. Check out the database and add media to the list. The original MediaOnTwitter, developed by Sarah Evans, is a comprehensive tool supercharged by the support of TrackVia and supported by HARO founder, Peter Shankman.   People were pointed to the following URL stating they can now enter all media contacts at: http://www.trackvia.com/misc/media-database-submission.htm    But, it does not come up at all, now.

UPDATE#2: It is an election year and so I provide a link to the  The Top 20 Political Journalists on Twitter along with a few other updates I came across. Share and repost!

UPDATE#3: NYTimes Journalists on Twitter

UPDATE #4: Masterlist of UK Journalists on Twitter

UPDATE #5: AFP Journalists on Twitter [LAST UPDATED: May 17, 2012]. More and more AFP journalists are on Twitter, to the point where a simple old #FollowFriday is difficult, so If you’re on the list and your title wrong, or it;s left you off entirely, please let me know.  The same AFP list is on Twitter @ AFP_twitter. A public list by Grégoire Lemarchand of AFP journalists on Twitter (french, english, spanish…)

Update #6: Sourcing and networking with journalists. Need a source? Then follow Peter Shankman (@skydiver), founder of Help a Reporter Out, on Twitter. He’ll typically post tweets prefaced by UrgHARO: with instructions on the topic and how to respond. Help a Reporter Out touts more than 100,000 sources. HelpAReporter.com has a sign-up page in which sources can get up to three emails daily with 15 to 30 queries per email. Journalists submit their queries using an online form.

Update #6:  Tweet weekly with other journalists, bloggers, public relations or media types with #journchat. It’s 7 to 10 p.m. central time every Monday, and tweeps join by using the #journchat hashtag.

Update #7:

Clay Shirky is famous for having said “There is no such thing as information overload – there’s only filter failure.” Making sense of an overflowing Twitter stream is an ongoing act of curation – finding ways to follow just the most interesting readers, or to gather tweets that are relevant to your life or job.

While saved searches and hash tags provide a way to gather info from across Twitter by keyword, the Lists feature does the opposite – it gathers tweets from across the service by particular users, regardless the content of their tweets. Every Twitter user can create lists, add users to those lists, and can even track lists created by other users. As a journalist, you might create custom lists for:

  • Other journalists
  • Other publications
  • Journalists at your own publication
  • Community leaders
  • School leaders in your community
  • Economists
  • Data visualization experts
  • Sports reporters covering soccer leagues

You get the idea. Whatever your need or interest, you want to find people on Twitter with expertise in that area, and add them to a list.

Media People Using Twitter categorizes journalist by country and then lists their name, news organization and Twitter username. My Creative Team’s site said it can’t accept any more editors, but submissions and updates can be emailed. The Media People on Twitter wiki content can be downloaded into Microsoft Word document format.The Media Outlets Using Twitter wiki lists news organizations by country, company name and Twitter username or page URL.

Tweet weekly with other journalists, bloggers, public relations or media types with #journchat. It’s 7 to 10 p.m. central time every Monday, and tweeps join by using the #journchat hashtag.

(My Bio) Today media, journalists, writers, reporters, editors, correspondents, columnists are on Twitter.  Twitter is very quickly gaining momentum, support and market inertia and is on direct path to mainstream awareness, and not for just mindless tweets.  Twitter may just be the new telegraph wire.

I came across about seven seperate lists of journalist, editors, columnists who are on Twitter, and we all know in about five minutes this will morph into something newer, better, faster. But, until then, I thought this could be useful gathering point for many to many. And, it seems each list has names on them, but each may not be comprehensive. In time, the top dog will evolve. It is my hope that each one will be of help to communications and business professionals alike. I would take from any of these lists and create your own personal lists with a few of my suggestions directly below for consideration.

How PR Professionals Can Use Twitter Lists

  • Create a private list of journalists you want to follow or target with story ideas
  • Organize media contacts by geography, beat, past interaction, etc.
  • Create a list of media organizations, to keep tabs on current events or stories – for example, create a list of the top social media Twitter users

At best, it is a place to start to look at where and who is on Twitter. I imagine, eventually there will be an organic aggregated model that will take in all of these.

1) I personally think the first list is quite good becasue I can take this one and put it into spread sheet format, say for clients?  Media on Twitter. It is a real-time database you can update yourself.  Its only downside it that there is not a search feature to it. So you will have to use the find/replace option on your browser.

2) Then, there is MuckRack which has a little picture of each journalist, editor, reporter, columnist and anchor listed by publication

3) Cision’s JournalistTweets is the latest entry into the mix, also providing a directory of journalists on Twitter. JournalistTweets is powered by Cision’s Media Database, which could signal there will be a tighter integration between the Twitter directory and its commercial PR software in the future. This would make sense, since Cision did announce earlier this year that it would be including Twitter handles in its media database. Cision has also integrated search into its JournalistTweets, making it easy for you to search keywords across only journalists in the JournalistTweet database. This is the feature most PR professionals will probably be most excited

4) Another source for finding journalists and media professionals on Twitter is directories like Twellow and WeFollow.  The exhaustive Twitter directory created by Digg founder Kevin Rose called WeFollow which allows journalists to find other news professionals or even experts by hashtag. Tweeps are listed in order of the number of followers they have. To get added, users pick the three hashtags under which they want to be listed and then tweet the results to submit the listing. These directories list Twitter users across all kinds of categories, making it easy for you to search by keyword. For example, you can search “journalist” or “editor” or “election 2012″ to find Twitter users that have used those words in their profile. You can also browse by categories and narrow searches to refine your results. You will have to weed through the contacts.

5) You may also want to try the Journalists On Twitter Wetpaint wiki. This wiki has a lot of good contacts in it, though its creators stopped updating it a couple months ago (something about too many journalists on Twitter).

6) Below is what looks like the first attempts to annotate Journalists using a Wiki, MediaOnTwitter, from PRSarahEvans.com. While MediaOnTwitter is a good original comprehensive list.

7) On a PB Wiki called TwitteringJournalists on Twitter. I have pasted the named in below.
—————————————————————————————————————–
Source for this USA List

Abbie Lundberg, CIO, @abbielundberg
Adam Aston, Energy & Environment Editor, BusinessWeek, @adamnyc
Alfred Edmond, Jr., Sr. Editor-in-Chief, BlackEnterprise.com @alfrededmondjr
Allison Wenger, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @awenger
Amanda Emily, Web Developer, KXLY, @wageek
Amanda Murphy, Assignment Editor, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @amandamurphy
Amy Basista, Anchor/Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @AmyNBC4
Amy Feldman, Associate Editor, BusinessWeek, @amyfeldman
Ana Marie Cox, Time, @anamariecox
Andrea Cambern, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @Andrea10TV
Andrew Feinberg, FCC and Congressional Reporter, Telecommunications/Internet Policy, BroadbandCensus.com, @AGFHome
Andrew Mrozinski, Editor, Ridestory, Mesa, AZ @ridestory
Andrew Phelps, NPR, @andrewphelps
Andy Abramson, KenRadio’s World Technology RoundUp, http://twitter.com/andyabramson
Andy Hirsch, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Andy10TV
Andy Long, Videojournalist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @AndyL_WCMH
Angela An, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @AngelaAn10TV
Angie Goff, Traffic, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @angiegoff
Angie Hissong, Assignment Editor, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @angie235
Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs, @marketingprofs
Anna M. Gonzalez, Web Producer, CBS11TV.com/ TXA21TV.com , @GonzalezInTheAm
Anne Kornblut, Washington Post, @annekornblut
Ari Berman, The Nation, @ariberman
Arik Hesseldahl, Senior Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @ahess247
Asher Grey, radio reporter, @ashergrey
Avital Binshtock, freelance writer and editor (L.A. Times, Frommer’s, etc.), San Francisco, CA, @avitalb
Bailey Cultice, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @bcultice
Beau Bishop, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @BeauBishop
Ben Gelber, Meteorologist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @bgelber
Ben Levisohn, Staff Editor, Finance, BusinessWeek, @ben_levisohn
Ben Kuchera, Ars Technica, @benkuchera
Bob Ney, Congressional Commentator, Talk Radio News Service, @bobney
Bonnie King, Publisher, Salem News, Salem, OR @OregonNews
Brandon Bowers, Online Content Editor, Merced Sun-Star, @brandonbowers
Brandon Mendelson, Blogger, Albany Times Union @bjmendelson
Brian Stelter, NY Times, @brianstelter
Brittany Westbrook, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Brittany10TV
Burt Helm, Marketing Editor, BusinessWeek, @burthelm
Cathy von Hassel-Davies, Truthful Politics & Truthful Journalism, Saxapahaw, NC @catnc
Cara Connelly, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Cara10TV
Carlos Gonzales, Weather, WBNS-10TV, @CarlosG10TV
Caroline McCarthy, CNET, @caro
Chad Livengood, Politics Reporter, Springfield (MO) News Leader, @ChadLivengood
Charles Cooper, CNET, @coopeydoop
Charles Dubow, Lifestyle Channel Editor, BusinessWeek.com, @charlesdubow
Cheryl Biren, Managing Editor, OpEdNews.com @cherylbiren
Chi-Chu Tschang, Bejing Correspondent, BusinessWeek, @tschang
Chris Booker, E.P. Special Projects, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @BookerNBC4
Chris Bradley, Weather, WBNS-10TV, @ChrisB10TV
Chris Cadelago, Blogger/Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle, @ccadelago
Chris Cuomo, News Anchor, Good Morning America, @ChrisCuomo
Chris Kromm, Editor/Publisher, Facing South Online and Southern Exposure Magazine, @chriskromm
Chris LaFortune, Pioneer Press, Oak Park, IL @cubreporter
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Job Search Engine Websites

October 21, 2011 12 comments

There are a few places where job search resources are available, which was originally posted by Eric Shannon on January 24, 2011 in job boards. The 2011 guide list to the top 100 US job search categories. I like it becuse it lists the top 3 or 4 niche job search websites.

The top 30 job site niches. These rankings represent an average of 12 months search data at Google and are influenced by seasonal considerations as well as the business cycle — so take this top 30 for what it is, just a snapshot in time.

Also, here is a quick list of job search sites as well directly below from the Search Engine List

Veteran Job Search Resourses: VetJobs,   Veteran Job Search  The Riley Guide, Job Opportunities for Disabled Veterans – JOFDAV 

  • Helmets to Hardhats   Helps transitioning Military and Veterans find careers in the building and construction trades.
  • Military.com   Designed for military personnel with: military skills translator, business interest quiz, industry exploration tool, guide to headhunters and job listings.
  • Hire Heroes USA   Provides career placement assistance to all returning service men and women focusing on placement of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veterans from all branches of the military.
  • HireRetiredOfficers.com   Retired and separated Commissioned Officers and Senior Noncommissioned Officers of the United States military services post resumes and search for jobs on this website.
  • HireVeterans.com   Receives and posts job opportunities from employers who want to hire transitioning military and Veterans in a variety of occupations
  • Recruit Veterans, Inc. 
  • Toyota’s Hire A Hero Program   Hundreds of available jobs at independently owned Toyota and Lexus dealerships.
  • VeteransToEnergy.org   A job search portal site dedicated to helping U.S. military Veterans find careers in the oil and natural gas industry.

Hispanic Job Search Resources: http://www.hispanicsurf.com/jobs-careers_surf.htm

Career Builder Career Builder: The career builder website.
Craig's List Craig’s List: is a centralized network of online communities, with free classified ads (with jobs, internships, housing, personals, services, community, gigs, resume, and pets categories) and forums.
CV Fox | Find resumes (CV's) from all over the World Wide Web CV Fox: A search engine that is designed to hunt down and retrieve resumes (CV’s) from all over the Internet. Free to use, has become a popular tool with professional recruiters.
Dice.com Dice.com is the #1 technology job board. For technology experts in areas such as Information Technology (IT), software, high tech, security, biotech, and more. Recently purchased eFinancialCareers.com.
Eluta.ca Eluta.ca (Canada) – High-paying jobs in Canada directly from employers’ websites. Seach new full-time jobs at 71000+ employers across Canada.
HotJobs Hot Jobs (Yahoo): Find a job, post your resume, research careers at featured companies, compare salaries and get career advice on Yahoo! HotJobs.
Incruit (Korea) Incruit (Korea): Incruit claims to be the first Korean match making site between job seekers and companies and claims the first Korean Internet résumé database (June 1. 1998).
Indeed.com Indeed.com: A job ‘meta-search’ that scours job boards, newspapers and multiple sources with one search interface.
Jobs.pl (Poland) Jobs.pl (Poland): Run by an American/Polish team of MBA’s, Poland’s leading job portal. Partially owned by European Media Group “Orkla Press” from Scandinavia.
JobsDB (Asia/Pacific) JobsDB (Asia/Pacific): An Asia/Pacific focused job and recruitment site with databases dedicated to each country in the Asia/Pacific region.
JobPilot JobPilot (Owned by Monster): A European job site now owned by Monster.com. Focused on European jobs with branches in a number of European countries.
JobServe Jobserve: UK based job search focused originally on IT Contracting work, but now covering multiple areas. Resume database, large number of job postings.
Monster.com Monster.com: The world’s largest resume database and online job search.
Naukri (India) Naukri.com (India): An India-focused job search engine.
Recruit.net Recruit.net: A job search engine that allows you to search jobs worldwide.
Simply Hired SimplyHired.com – Job search engine. Search over 5 million job listings and thousands of jobs sites to find a job you love.
StepStone StepStone (Europe): European online recruitment site based in Scandinavia with operations and subsidiaries througout Europe.
The Ladders TheLadders.com (USA) Job search for professional jobs in the most comprehensive source of $100K+ jobs on the internet.
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