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Newsweek Magazine to End an Era of Print

October 19, 2012 3 comments

Newsweek CoverNewsweek is closing down it’s print edition at the end of 2012.  As a result of this news, I bought a copy of Newsweek for my archives last night.   In 2003, Newsweek’s worldwide circulation was more than 4 million, including 2.7 million in the U.S; by 2010 it was down to 1.5 million (with newsstand sales declining to just over 40 thousand copies per week). Newsweek publishes editions in Japanese, Korean, Polish, Spanish, Rioplatense SpanishArabic, and Turkish, as well as an English language Newsweek InternationalRussian Newsweek, published since 2004, was shut in October 2010.  The Bulletin (an Australian weekly until 2008) incorporated an international news section from Newsweek.  Based in New York City, the magazine has 22 bureaus: nine in the U.S.: New York City, Los Angeles,  Chicago/Detroit, Dallas, Miami, Washington, D.C., Boston and San Francisco, as well as overseas in London, Paris, Berlin, Moscow, JerusalemBaghdad, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Beijing, South AsiaCape Town, Mexico City and Buenos Aires.

 

I come from an era where reading a real newspaper or weekly news magazine ( see top US magazines by circulation) was a regular event for me.  Sadly, it’s been probably about a year or more since I’ve read a full newspaper from front page to the back.  And now, it may actually become a lost “art” of sorts, sooner than one might think.  I believe our newspaper journalists are an endangered species.

In fact, I am starting to collect a few newspapers. Just a few here and there that are news worthy or interesting to me, like my earlier post about my late 1800 Penny Press Newspaper from France, Newsweek, Time, the election of President Obama, and the death’s of Princess Diana and Micheal Jackson.

Here are some examples of newspapers that closed during 2012: 

The New Orleans Times-Picayune, a fixture in the Big Easy since 1837, will slash its staff and production schedule, going from 7 to 3 days a week beginning this fall. The body count isn’t known yet, but estimates are that at least a third of the staff will be fired. Those who stay are expected to take pay cuts.

The Times-Picayune, which is owned by Newhouse Newspapers, is apparently taking a page from the Ann Arbor News, another Newhouse paper that cut its frequency to twice-weekly more than three years ago.

The Detroit Media Partnership was the first to eliminate daily frequency in late 2008. Many smaller papers have since quietly cu

Newspaper dispenser, Newspaperst money-losing Monday, Tuesday and Saturday editions.

Additionally, The Birmingham News, Mobile Press-Register and Huntsville Times will also reduce frequency to three days a week. They’ll become part of a “new digitally focused media company” called the Alabama Media Group.  Read more on Al.com.

According to Newspaper Layoffs  for 2012, there have been more than 1850 layoffs and buyouts have occurred thus far at U.S. newspapers.  Here is a list by the same source of closed print newspapers.

Tracing the decline and death of each newspapers is tough.  But, a report from the FCC.gov in 2010 on page 41 shows a list of about 212 closed newspapers from 2007-2010 [ it also offers some excellent historical insights as well].

Newspapers across the country have experienced severe cutbacks during the past decade, which has undermined their ability to perform their role as the nation’s watchdog.

Ad revenue dropped nearly 48 percent between 2005 and 2010, and with it the industry’s annual spending on reporting and editing capacity dropped by $1.6 billion, from 2006 to 2009, a reduction of more than 25 percent, according to the Pew Research Center’s

Project for Excellence in Journalism and Rick Edmonds of the Poynter Institute. The number of full-time journalists at daily newspapers fell from a peak of about 56,900 in 1989 to 41,600 in 2010, a level not seen since before the Watergate era.

Below is more information about are some of those newspapers which died in 2009.   As you may have noticed, newspapers had a very rough year.  But you may not quite appreciate the magnitude of the collapse, just from 2009 alone. “Today is the end of an era,” said Cynthia Cather Burton, editor of the 104-year-old Clarke Courier.

Just in 2009:

  • 105 newspapers have been shuttered.
  • more than 10,000 newspaper jobs were lost.
  • Print ad sales fell 30% in Q1 ’09.
  • 23 of the top 25 newspapers reported circulation declines between 7% and 20%

Here is a list of the dead Newspapers from 2009:

West Bloomfield Eccentric
Troy Eccentric
Rochester Eccentric
Southfield Eccentric
The Carson Times
Douglas Times
Fallon Star Presss
The Daily Reporter
Dennis Pennysaver
Yarmouth Pennysaver
East Bridgewater Star
West Bridgewater Times
Whitman Times
Hanson Town Crier
Plymouth Bulletin
Algonquin Countryside
Cary-Grove Countryside
Wauconda Courier
Arlington Heights Post
Elk Grove Times
Hoffman Estates Review
Palatine Countryside
Rolling Meadows Review
Schaumburg Review Bloomfield Journal
Windsor Journal
Windsor Locks Journal
Coatesville Ledger
Donegal Ledger
Downingtown Ledger
Doylestown Patriot 
East Hartford Gazette
Elizabethtown Chronicle 
Gazette Advertiser
Germantown Courier
Mount Airy Times Express
Harlem Valley Times
Millbrook Round Table
Voice Ledger
Hyde Park Townsman
The Independent
New Hope Gazette
Northern Star
Oxford Tribune
Parkesburg Post Ledger
Solanco Sun Ledger 
Pawling News Chronicle
Petoskey Citizen-Journal
Putnam County Courier 
Quakertown Free Press
Register Herald
The Town Meeting
American Fork Citizen
Lehi Free Press
Lone Peak Press
Orem Times
Pleasant Grove Review
Baltimore Examiner
The Bethel Beacon
The Brookfield Journal
The Kent Good Times Dispatch
The Litchfield Enquirer
Big Sky Sun
The Bulletin
The City Star
Dakota Journal
The Democrat
East Iowa Herald
Fort Collins Now
Grapevine Sun
Hardee Sun
The Hershey Chronicle
Hill Country View
Iraan News
Jeanerette Enterprise
The Journal-Messenger
LA City Beat
Lake Elmo Leader
Lake Norman Times
Lakota Journal
Los Gatos Weekender
West San Jose Resident
Maricopa Tribune
McCamey News
The Milford Observer
Ming Pao New York
Ming Pao San Francisco
The Newton Record
Oak Cliff Tribune
The Rockingham News
Rocky Mountain News
Stillwater Courier
Vail Sun
Valley Journal
The Weekly Almanac
Wheeling Countryside
Des Plaines Times
Mount Prospect Times

So what are we to do? Where will the local obituary postings go? Newspapers also supplied huge amounts of revenue to the postal system for shipping. Is it also somewhat linked to the decline of the US Post Office as well? It is indeed having a ripple effect, I am sure. But, I digress.

Is you newspaper dead?  What do you do for your news now?  I am particularly interested in the older age groups who may not use social media and the Internet so profusely.

Feel free to tell me about your dead newspaper, provide it’s  name in the comments section, and what you miss most about print news.

The following state of our media, trends and information comes directly from PEW’s  recent 2012 State of the Media Report which also show significant changes in how people get their news.

PEW indicates that 70% of Facebook news consumers get most of their story links from friends and family.

And, only 13% say most links that they follow come from news organizations. On Twitter, however, the mix is more even: 36% say most of the links they follow come from friends and family, 27% say most come from news organizations, and 18% mostly follow links from non-news entities such as think tanks.

By 2015, roughly one out of every five display ad dollars is expected to go to Facebook, according to the same source. So who is still putting advertising in newspapers?   Well here are some more interesting facts.

As many as 100 newspapers are expected in coming months to join the roughly 150 dailies that have already moved to some kind of digital subscription model.

In part, newspapers are making this move after witnessing the success of The New York Times, which now has roughly 390,000 online subscribers.  The move is also driven by steep drops in ad revenue. Newspaper industry revenue — circulation and advertising combined — has shrunk 43% since 2000.

In 2011, newspapers overall lost roughly $10 in print ad revenue for every new $1 gained online. (That suggests no improvement from what a separate PEJ study of 38 papers found regarding 2010, when the print losses to digital gains in the sample were a $7-to-$1 ratio.)

Furthermore, newsrooms continued to shrink as companies, to remain in the black, felt the need for more rounds of cost reductions. The contemporary newsroom has fewer articles to produce after trims in the physical size of paper and reduction of the space devoted to news. But the remaining editors and reporters are also being stretched further by the need to generate content suitable for smartphones and tablets as well as establishing a social media presence.

This is all in addition to putting out the print paper daily and feeding breaking news to websites. In company management, the shift to outsiders with backgrounds in digital, especially at major companies, was striking.

The CEOs of Gannett (Craig Dubow) and the industry’s largest private company, Media News (William Dean Singleton), stepped aside for health reasons.

New York Times chief executive Janet Robinson retired under pressure late in the year. Associated Press president and chief executive Tom Curley announced early in 2012 that he would be retiring, too. During the course of the year, the top editor’s job turned over at The New York Times, USA Today, The Los Angeles Times and a host of metros.

Newspapers began changing hands again in late 2011. The trend of private equity owners gaining control through bankruptcy proceedings continues to grow and they tend to take an aggressive approach to digital transition. The most high-profile example is John Paton, the chief executive backed by Alden Global Capital, who is pursuing a “digital-first” strategy at the Journal Register and MediaNews Group papers.The biggest of the private equity takeovers will come when Tribune Company bankruptcy proceedings, now in their fourth year, conclude.

Probably the biggest transaction in 2011 was the $143 million sale of The New York Times’ 16-paper region group to Halifax Media, a company formed two years ago to buy The Daytona Beach News-Journal. The Times had assembled the papers and run them at high profit margins in the 1970s and 1980s to balance out business ups and downs at its flagship paper. Lately, the regional group was shedding revenue faster than The New York Times itself, so the company chose to sell the papers and invest the proceeds in digital development.

Important footnotes to read more about this overall topic.

  1. comScore. “Digital Omnivores: How Tablets, Smartphones and Connected Devices Are Changing U.S. Digital Media Consumption Habits.” Subscriber-access only at www.comscore.com. October 2011.
  2. eMarketer. “Facebook’s US User Growth Slows but Twitter Sees Double-Digit Gains.” March 5, 2012.
  3. Olmstead, Kenny; Mitchell, Amy, and Rosenstiel, Tom. “Navigating News Online: Where People Go, How They Get There and What Lures Them Away.” Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. May 9, 2011.
  4. Search Engine Use 2012.” Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. March 9, 2012.
  5. The Facebook Fascination on Social Media.” Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism. Feb. 2, 2012.

I for one, will miss print news both from a sniff and scratch standpoint but also because three generations in my family have been associated with news and journalism in one way or another. First with my grandmother who was a published philatelic journalist,  my father wrote for his school newspaper, and I have written and published news both locally and nationally.

Thanks for reading!

The Power of Good News; One Person at a Time.

July 8, 2012 Comments off

Today, our news is filled with accounts of sensationalized news, recent horrible storms, a terrible record-setting heat wave with temperatures reaching 105 degrees, and other bad news; such as the economy, unemployment, murder, crime, war and the like. There has indeed been a substantive amount of news lately, and even more complaining about certain local electric company’s inability to fixing things fast enough.

Well, yesterday I heard a story by word of mouth from a friend (about 15 miles away in Germantown, Maryland) where an 86 a year old woman had walked to the big box food store in the 100 degree heat to buy some food and ice as she was out of her small ration of food which she had kept on ice in a little cooler which contained bologna and cheese for sandwiches.

More critically, no one, not a single person had checked in on her and she had no family in the area. She mentioned to the deli worker that there were a lot of elderly in her neighborhood.  She did not have any AC. She did not own a car anymore.  She did not have a cell phone. She did not have the Internet.  And, she had survived the intense 100 degree weather by sitting in her doorway step to catch a little breeze when it came through.

I was shocked, no I was mad actually to hear about this.   No one had checked on her or the other elderly in her neighbor.  But, she assured my friend that she was fine, just a little hot.My friend could not leave her job with 35 people in line buying food in the aftermath of the storms and electrical outages, but she gave her personal phone number-just encase she needed anything-at any time. The elderly woman then walked back home, in the 100 plus degree weather.

It is my hope that you will take the time to go take some food and ice with you to the house bound, and the elderly who are possibly shut ins, check on them and offer to take them to nearby cooling centers or a local mall.

The heat has indeed been daunting (and winter time is also another tough time for specific at risk populations. Please go early and check on your neighbors, go door-to-door if need be. It will only take about a 1/2 hour of your time.

And, lest we forget the power of good and how just one single person can make a difference in the lives of others, I would like to share the following story I came across this morning.  I would like to encourage those of you reading to take a look at the short video clip directly below.

If you have not ever seen this before, it is a moving experience recently annotated (2008-1009) more than some 70 years later about Sir Nicholas Winton’s impact.

I hope we all can take to heart the quiet example of this one person and apply it to our lives today, without a lot of fan fare and news coverage.  In 2009, Sir Nicholas Winton turned 100 years old and he is now 103 years old. 
His advice from a long life: “Don’t be content in your life to just do no wrong, be ready everyday to do something good”

For more information here are a few other links:

Sir Nicholas Winton

A short news documentary by Joe Schlesinger:

A short student documentary about students’ experiences during the Bratislava History Project included meeting Sir Nicholas Winton and HM Queen Elizabeth II. It is a student film produced by 12th grade IB Film students at the British International School of Bratislava.

May each of us remember the potential impact for good we each have in our own lives to touch others.

We do not need modern technology to do some thing genuinely good for others, but because of modern technology we are able to learn of the selfless deeds of one man some 70 years earlier.

 

The Penny Press in France & Le Petite Journal Illustre

April 24, 2012 5 comments

Image

It has been unseasonably cold and rainy the past couple of days, so I thought I would tackle a little history project I have wanted to write about regarding a particular little penny press newspaper.  

As of January 2012, The New York Times raised its daily price to $2.50! Think back to the penny press at the turn of the last century, have you ever wondered what such a paper would cost today, inflation adjusted? Answer: a quarter (Source Article: (Jeff Jarvis). The picture to the left is a copy of an original penny press newspaper which I own and bought in the south of France, in 1994.   I had just completed my public relations degree and was studying the French language in Aix-en Provence.  At the time, I considered not bringing the two antique newspapers with me because I and my two children were carrying backpacks and only one small rolling bag. I was afraid of damaging it on the flight back to the United States. I am so glad that I chose to hand carry it and it survived.

In the 1880′s, this newspaper only cost a penny! The original historic art print alone is priceless, in my humble opinion. Journalism has been a career thread which has run in our family, but I did not know that when I started my course work.  I only learned of it later from my father once I began taking journalism courses during the second year during my undergraduate work.   My grandmother, Edith Faulstich was a Philatelic journalist.  Below is a short list regarding some of her writing history:

1)‘Newark Sunday News’ for 26 year (Nov. 24, 1946–1972)
2)‘The Record”, Hackensack, New Jersey ( 1961–1966)
3) ‘Bergen Evening Record” (January 16, 1922 -Sept 14, 1968)

Faulstich was also editor of: (see publication source addresses here)
4) ‘Postal History Journal’ from May 1957 (Vol.1. No.1) to 1967
5) ‘Western Stamp Collector’
6)‘Covers’, and
7)‘The Essay-Proof Journal’

But, I digress a bit. As this is post is about this specific Penny Press newspaper from France.

The ” Little Diary “is one of the oldest newspapers in France. It began publication in 1863 and the creation should be considered as one of the events most deeply embedded into the life of Parisians of yesteryear. In the history of the press, that is more that a mere episode, that is the memorable date of a revolution, not only in journalism but in social manners.

The present generation can not imagine what newspaper industry was like before the appearance of the five cent newspaper. This popular newspaper brought it within the reach of every budget in France.  But, it was also during a time when the press did not enjoy any freedom of the Press.

Legislators had made it suspicious  and was newspapers were relegated extensively.  The Government of the day placed heavy bonds; censorship, jealous watching  of publishers -very closely, and with the slightest hint of criticism, the slightest allusion to political bashing, heavy fines fell upon the publisher as thick as hail; to recidivism, that was the prohibition of the times. The prohibition of free speech, in France.

As a result it is enough to say that the masses of people, workers, employees, petty bourgeois were condemned not to read newspapers. The wealthy themselves are looked at twice before they subscribed to a newspaper. Some would only read the newspaper reading room, on the others’ subscriptions when they heard of their neighbors  taking out a subscription to one of the largest newspapers of Paris.

Millaud had, by way of creating the Little Diary, other intentions. Rather, to give each person an every day look at life, an echo of national life: information, news story, inspired by the chronic current events, talks about the theater, variety, novels, but no politics! The Government Policy, that was then certain death. And news had to live. The Diary lived indeed.

~ Jean Lecocq. (Almanac 1940)

Le Petit Journal (Journal was sold for a penny: 5 centimes) on 1-2-1863 was created by Moses (said Polydore) Millaud, non-political and therefore not stamped, at half-size, consisting originally of four pages, eight pages as of 1898 and six in 1901.

The aim was to attract the maximum number of subscriptions and to attract advertising. The dominant strategy was to sell at the lowest possible price. In 1863, Moses Polydore Millaud widely publicized “Le Petit Journal” and is the first French newspaper whose strategy was to create access based on the sensational. The selling price was also low in order to make it a popular newspaper, for everyone.

For failing to pay the stamp (5 cents per issue) that made the business impossible, the newspaper was apolitical. The authorities of the Second Empire favored the development of this cheap sheet and its competitors.

After September 4, 1870, with the stamp removed, Le Petit Journal was able to talk politics.

Despite some crises – in 1870, more than 400,000 copies were sold, and in 1892, one million copies.

Girardin took control in 1873. In 1937, it drew more than 150,000 copies when it became the organ of the Social français.

Replié in Clermont-Ferrand in June 1940, Le Petit Journal lived, poorly, until 1944, during which time he/it received a monthly grant from the Vichy government. Schedules of weekly publications, the most famous was his Supplement illustrated in color, whose images offered a picturesque example of the sights and popular ideology of the century.

The success of this penny newspaper caused a surge in a new type of periodicals (eg the Petit Parisien. Le Petit Parisien founded by Louis Andrieux, 1879, the first No. 16-10-1870.

The press has, throughout of 19 th century, evolved according to its industries and new technical possibilities. After the 1881 Act and during the 1890s, the press was still characterized by diversity, each with its French newspaper owner.

At the end of the century, the ground was laid, for the crisis that will soon shake the country: newspapers become a real power of the people.

Printed on the rotary machine chrono-type Marinoni

The Diary, in those heroic days, had not his print to it. No one knew yet that a single printing process: the draw that flat n ‘impressed that a copy of four pages at once and, because of the slowness s’ did the work, inevitably it restricted the paper’s circulation. Readers soon answered so many of the calls, that the printing Serrière declared himself unable to drasw enough alone.

It was therefore necessary to provide for the best merchants at the time, and use multiple printers. However, printing at that time, was not a free industry. We had to open one, buy a patent, and patents, whose numbers were limited, were in the hands of the printers who guarded them jealously and shared customers by various specialties: Books, newspapers, catalogs, paperwork , etc.. Newspaper printing was grouped around the Grange-boat-and growing. One of the busiest was the printing Schiller, 10 and 11, Faubourg Montmartre: it was responsible for some of the copies of Diary.

The First Rotary Press

Hippolyte Marinoni could have been, in the words then of a spiritual writer, “a romantic hero for his own newspaper” The son of a policeman of Corsican origin, he had in his childhood, kept cattle. And, he was far from being ashamed of his humble origin. Marinoni was a laborer in a factory of hand presses and type-founder.

Finally, in 1872, he realized the extraordinary invention of the rotary press with automatic feeder and continuous paper, regularly pulling 40,000 copies per hour. Some years after, he built the great Marinoni rotary multicolor printing press, which churned out 20,000 copies from a single shot in six colors, which were printed as illustrated publications, succédanées of Petite Journal, including the  Illustrated Diary , which were hand drawn, once a week, and printed up to twelve hundred thousand copies.

History of How the “Little Illustrated Journal” was Published

(Imperfectly Translated from French).  The Department of this newspaper asked its readers to stay in close communion and this wish was fulfilled for a longtime as a result of the huge number of letters received,  offering approval and very sincere encouragement. Therefore, we thought it would be nice to keep the paper alive, showing a little of thier lives, and the succession of different yet consistent efforts, necessary for the manufacture of a newspaper, and to penetrate deep Behind the Scenes – dare I say – of a large illustrated weekly like ours. 

 Here, as elsewhere, the division of labor was required. Above all, who is the Director, based on experience and knowledge to satisfy the public, giving directions to follow and supervise its execution. Under him, the writing service, editor, general secretary, implements and oversaw that her designs are shown.  Thus, each week, the Director took care of the editorial materials, which would form the number for the following week. These materials were of two kinds: first, what is known in terms of the business, the “copy”, that is to say, articles and stories, then the illustrations, including drawings and photographs. 

It was very delicate work back then, not only because it had to please the greatest number of readers, because everyone did not have the same tastes, but also because it had to be interesting to follow the news. News was and still is fleeting. What is interesting one day may no longer be the week after. But the manufacture of a weekly is infinitely longer than a day. We may at any time be too late. 

The materials were gathered into the hands of the editor. It then went immediately to the internal executing agencies.  The “copy” first, was sent to he service composition without review. Previously, they couldn’t  ignore it, because they knew that the composition of type had to be done by hand. The characters, distributed into the type compartments with lead  “breaks”, for each and every line of news which was laid out one by one, all by hand by a worker who formed lines. It was very time consuming labor.

 “Today”, much has been simplified and enables this work to be completed by using machines called linotypes. These have a linotype keyboard not unlike that of typewriters. Just to the operator – which is often an operator – to press each key on the keyboard so that the matrix of the corresponding letter comes down in a compartment intended for receiving. When the line is complete, a single shot lever activates the machine. The set of matrices is shown in the orifice of a home with molten lead. The result is a small tablet which bears on one of its edges, the embossed characters of the entire line. Matrices are automatically removed and distributed into the store from which they emerge, again, then the operator presses the corresponding key. 

Just as there were typists more skillful than others, there were also more skilled operators. On average, a good operator dialed 6,000 letters, 150 lines per hour. 

 The picture to the left is titled” Component of youth operators for creating   newspaper articles sitting at the linotype machine”

When an entire article or a story was composed, we made a test by passing over the surface of the thick ink, and then laying on top of it a sheet of paper and hitting it with a big brush. The test thus obtained wass assigned to a grader, who read the test “copy” and pointed out errors in the composition. Errors were corrected to the linotype by redoing the entire line.
Only the titles were still made with movable type, one by one by hand. It was the beginning of the use of making specialized headlines.

***

Meanwhile, the illustrations are processed by the photo etching. The illustrations were created in black ink and photographs are reproduced by a process, common in those days, whose origins date back to Talbot’s invention in 1852 . 

For the longest time, it’ is true that we only knew of the woodcut pictures which were only created and obtained by arduous manual labor from an artist, sculpting virtually on a board of boxwood and engraving it, chiseling the art worked well.  Thanks to an ingenious use of photography, they mechanically reproduced art on zinc or copper plates for the illustrations for the newspaper. 

The process is similar, though more delicate and complicated for large color compositions, which were located on the first and last page of the Illustrated Diary. Note, however, we had a need to get as many pictures as there were colors in the universe. For black, blue, yellow and red, that’s four shots that would be later set on the press and on which turned the white paper into colorful art.  Four colors, you say! But there were more than four colors in the prints that illustrated the newspaper? No doubt, but the green is obtained by superposition of blue and yellow and other colors by layering the same kind.

***

And they met the “copy” and illustrations clichés. Then begins the work of layout.  This job runs on large tables that, for a very old tradition, we continue to call “home plate”. Under the supervision of Secretary of writing which indicates the position of articles and photographs, these are arranged in forms or large cast iron frames that tightly clasp. When this work is completed, it is, the content of each form, a race named special “morass.” The morasses are revised by the corrector, which seeks to track the latest faults are forgotten or layout errors.Then the editor examines in turn and, if it has no comment to make, given the right to shoot.

If we drew on hardware platforms, we could immediately bring these forms to the printer. But everyone knows that more these days, are used for rotating the huge prints of the great modern newspapers. Transformative work is still needed. He runs to the stereotype.  There, introduced forms are placed in a special machine that molds them on a print taken by a kind of wide paper carton hurry. This blank, it curves to give the exact shape corresponding to the rotating rollers. Finally, each blank, and curved, is used to make one or more curved, and it is these images, the result of a sequence of transformations, which will finally get the newspaper.

The stereotype where the forms are used to make cylindrical clichés, is noted to the right. Now, this is the last part of whee the job execution begins on one of those admirable rotating machines in which the invention is due to Hippolyte Marinoni, both creator of modern printing and for many years director of the Petit Journal.

Under the orders of the chief driver, snapshots from the stereotype are set on the rollers of the machine and the big roll of paper begins to unfold its leaves through the endless maze of wheels, connecting rods and countless bodies of steel.

Despite the appearance, start-up demand meticulous care. Because of the four different inks used for color prints, you must engage in a very delicate work of identification. We must also adjust the pressure on the plates and the arrival of the inks so that the text is neither too gray or too dark. Finally everything is ready, after many hours of experience and tests. The great “roto” starts to devour the paper at full speed and make it in the form of copies printed, folded, cut, such that we can finally see, a few days later, in depositories and in newsagents all over France.
It will be appreciated by comparing two numbers, the benefits of rotary flat on the machine, it once drew an average of 2,000 sheets per day. The rotary Illustrated Diary , though less rapid than that of a newspaper, printed only in black, delivers 10,000 copies per hour. - R

The presses were used every week to get the ‘Petit Journal Illustrated and printed for circulation”  

Thanks for reading about the history of this newspaper from 1894. If you have any tidbits of history to add or comments about the paper, or the history of the penny press I would welcome insights and additional information.

Now, onto finding out the history of my other little French newspaper printed March 1891, Le Soleil du Dimanche, all 16 pages!

Where to Find Archives of Newspapers (Online)

April 23, 2012 2 comments

 How to Find Old Newspapers Online

With the impending death of paper, U.S. Post Offices and the decline of Newspapers, I have begun performing some preliminary research regarding one of two French newspapers I bought in a little book store in the south of France during my study abroad in 1994. I am beginning with  “Le Soleil du Dimanche.”  It is rather difficult learn anything about the history of this illustrative journal. I came across a list of newspaper resources and thought it might be useful to others. Once I find the scoop on this little 16 pager and Le Petite Journal, both printed in March 1891.

The Most Requested Newspapers

• The Herald Sun  • The London Times  • The NY Times  • NC State Library Newspaper Project                                                      •  The Raleigh News & Observer  • USA Today  • The Wall Street Journal  • The Washington Post

North Carolina Community Newspapers

• NC Community Newspapers • America’s Newspapers: NC

Lists of Online Newspapers Worldwide

  • 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers - Provides full text access to the British Library’s collection of the newspapers, pamphlets, books gathered by Reverend Charles Burney (1757-1817).
  • 19th Century British Library Newspapers Collection - Contains full runs of newspapers specially selected to best represent nineteenth-century Britain.
  • 19th Century U.S. Newspapers - Access to approximately 500 U.S. newspapers, published between 1800 and 1900.
  • Adams Papers Digital Edition - The database comprises John Adams’s complete diaries, selected legal papers, and the ongoing series of family correspondence and state papers.
  • Africa-Wide NiPAD - Provides multi-disciplinary coverage about African including politics, history, economics, business, mining, development, social issues, anthropology, natural history, literature, language, law, music and much more.
  • African American Newspapers - Includes over 200 African-American newspapers, arranged by state.
  • Alternative Press Index - Alternative Press Index Archive (APIA) is a bibliographic database of journal, newspaper, and magazine articles from over 700 international alternative, radical, and left periodicals.
  • America’s Historical Newspapers, 1690-1922 - America’s Historical Newspapers allows users to search U.S. historical papers published between 1690 and 1922, including titles from all 50 states.
  • America’s Newspapers: North Carolina - A quick link to the NC section of America’s Newspapers.
  • Atlanta Constitution (1868-1939) - Offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue.
  • Black Studies Center - Comprised of several cross-searchable component databases, including the International Index to Black Periodicals and historical black newspapers.
  • Canadian Newsstand -  This collection includes 21 national and leading regional newspapers, including: The Globe and Mail, National Post, Montreal Gazette, Ottawa Citizen, etc.
  • Chicago Tribune (1849-1986)
  • Factiva - Provides updated global information and news from major newspapers and business journals.
  • Gallica Project on French Newspapers - Allows access to full text for the following French newspapers: Le Figaro and son supplement litteraireLe TempsLa CroixL’HumaniteLa PresseLe Journal des debatsOuest-Eclair (editions de Rennes, Caen et Nantes).
  • Guardian and The Observer - The Guardian (1821-2003) and its sister paper, The Observer (1791-2003) provide online access to facts, firsthand accounts, and opinions of the day about the most significant and fascinating political, business, sports, literary, and entertainment events from the past 200 years.
  • Illustrated London News Historical Archive - Provides access to the entire run of the Illustrated London News from its first publication on 14 May 1842 to its last in 2003.
  • Informe - Contains the full text of popular magazines, academic journals and selected newspaper articles in Spanish.
  • InfoTrac Newsstand - provides indexing and full-text articles from major U.S. regional, national and local newspapers as well as leading titles from around the world.
  • Kidon Media Link - Newspapers, periodicals and other media sources from around the world.  Every country has its own integrated page.  There are no separate pages for newspapers, magazines, television, radio and news agencies.
  • Latin American Newsstand - Complete contents from over 35 full text Latin American newspaper titles in Spanish and Portuguese, with some additional content in English.  Most coverage starts with 2005, though some go back to 1995.
  • Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe - Provides full text access to a wide range of U.S. and international newspapers, radio and television transcripts.  Covers general, business and legal information sources.  Lexis-Nexis is available for the Duke Community only through this link.
  • Los Angeles Times
  • National Index to Chinese Newspapers & Periodicals - This is an index database of about 18,000 Chinese newspapers and periodicals published 1833-1949.
  • NC Newspapers Online - It includes 23,483 digital images of papers dating from 1752 to the 1890s, including the collection of 18th century newspapers the State Archives has on microfilm.  Included are the North Carolina Gazette (New Bern:  April 14, 1775), various newspapers from Edenton (1787-1801), Fayetteville (1798-1795), Hillsboro (1786), New Bern (1751-1804), and Wilmington (1765-1816).  In addition, the project includes the full run of two politically opposed newspapers from Salisbury, the Carolina Watchman (1832-1898) and The Western Carolinian (1820-1844).  Finally, the project also includes three lesson plans, derived from these newspapers, entitled Idealized Motherhood vs. the Realities of Mother hood in Antebellum North Carolina; Teaching About Slavery Through Newspaper Advertisements; and “A Female Raid” in 1863, or Using Newspaper Coverage to Learn More About North Carolina’s Civil War Home Front.
  • New York Times Book Review Archives - This is a full text archive of book reviews published in the New York Times since 1980.  It covers over 50,000 books and authors, in reviews as well as in news and interviews.  This database is listed on the Book Reviews subject list.
  • News & Observer, 1991-PresentNews & Observer, 2004-Present - NCLive now offers web access to full text articles from the Raleigh News & Observer through a database called InfoTrac Custom Newspapers.  The News & Observer is covered from 1991 to the present.
  • Newspaperindex.com - Newspapers and Front Pages in all countries.
  • Newspaper Source - Contains selected full text articles from over 140 regional U.S. newspapers, several international newspapers, newswires, and the Christian Science Monitor. The emphasis is business-related articles, although articles about national and international news events are also included.
  • North Carolina Periodicals Index - Produced by the Joyner Library at ECU, this free database provides indexing of articles from over 40 periodicals published in NC.  Most of these periodicals are not covered by other indexes or databases.  The Triangle’s “Independent Weekly” is one example.
  • ProQuest Historical Newspapers - New York Times, full text, from 1851 to three years before the current date.
  • ProQuest Historical Newspapers: Black Newspapers - Offers primary source material for the study of American history and African-American culture, history, politics, and the arts.
  • Regional Business News - A collection of business journals, newspapers and news wires covering all metropolitan and rural areas within the U.S.
  • Russian National Bibliography - allows users to digitally search the Russian Book Chamber’s (Knizhnaia palata) national bibliographies for citations from books, newspapers, journals, dissertation abstracts, musical scores, and maps.
  • SRDS Media Solutions - Provides advertising media rates and advertiser data through its coverage of traditional media – such as magazines, newspapers, television, direct marketing, and radio – as well as online sources.
  • Struggles for Freedom in Southern Africa - collection consists of more than 180,000 pages of documents and images, including periodicals, nationalist publications, records of colonial government commissions, local newspaper reports, personal papers, correspondence, UN documents, out-of-print and other particularly relevant books, oral testimonies, life histories, and speeches.
  • Taiwan Nichinichi Shinpo - Keyword searching and full text of official newspaper of Taiwan during the Japanese colonial period, including both Japanese (1898.5 – 1944.3) and Chinese (1905.7 – 1911.11) editions.
  • The Times Digital Archive, 1785-1985 - Provides full text access to The Times (London).  The full newspaper (including advertisements and illustrations) is given with full-page or specific article access, along with a facsimile (PDF) version.
  • Times of India - The Times of India (1838-2001) offers full page and article images with searchable full text back to the first issue.
  • Universal Database of Central Russian Newspapers - A full-text database of over 40 newspapers from Russia, including some English-language publications. (Visual material like photos, graphs, and drawings are not included.) Accessible in English or Russian.
  • Universal Databases - This interface provides a unified search engine for several of the Eastview Universal databases: Russian Central Newspapers (UDB-COM), Current Digest of the Post-Soviet Press (UDB-CD), Social Sciences & Humanities (UDB-EDU), Voprosy istorii: Complete Collection (UDB-VI), and Voprosy literatury: Complete Collection (UDB-VL).
  • Waterloo Directory of English Newspapers and Periodicals, 1800-1900 - A subject-inclusive, language-inclusive bibliography of newspapers and periodicals from Victorian England . Includes 6 alphabetical indexes: Title, Issuing body, People, Town, County, and Subject. Also included are titles in any language, published during any part of their life-span in England between January 1, 1800 and December 31, 1900.
  • World News Connection - A fee-based service of the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) which provides translations by FBIS and JPRS of non-English newspapers, speeches, journals, and some media broadcasts from foreign countries. Translations are added within 24–72 hours of original broadcast/publication, and the database goes back to 2003. Some non-U.S. English-language news sources are also included.
  • World Newspaper Archive - A fully searchable collection of historical newspapers from around the globe.
  • Yomiuri Newspaper, 1986- - Includes full text of Yomiuri shinbun (from Sept. 1986- to the present, with local editions beginning in Dec. 1986); along with the English edition: the Daily Yomiuri (Sept. 1989- to the present), both searchable by article, keyword, subject category, and issue.

FOX Station Airs Social Media Parody

October 25, 2010 Comments off

Is this the state of our Media? Have we gone too far? Not far enough? A FOX Station Airs Hilarious Social Media Parody… http://on.mash.to/9VkwwQ RT

Typhoon? What Would You Do? Are Your Prepared?

October 18, 2010 Comments off

Super-Typhoon Megi is hitting the Phillipines as I write this post. Thousands of people in the Philippines have fled from their homes ahead of a powerful storm, Super-Typhoon Megi, which is expected to reach the north of the country early on Monday. Megi, which has winds of up to more than 200km/h (125mph), is then forecast to move towards the South China Sea.

More to the point, what if that sort of scenario hit us here in the DC region? Florida? TX coast? California coast? What would you do? How would you take an active role in communicating to your family, and friends. If you are a young child or teen…you are not too young to get involved either.

It seems that only roughly 30% of the US population is prepared for any sort of emergency. And, only 20% have an emergency radio.

Why is it that we generally think it will happen to someone else and not ever “me” in some disconnected way?  

 Why is it we have time to play hours on some video game or Facebook Farmville “game” but seem to have no time to make an emergency plan for our self as an individual or for our family.  

Do you even know what the key hazard threats are for your town or county?  How would you motivate friends to prepare and prepare better?  If you are a teenager what would you do to make a change at your home? Your school? Your city or town?

1) The Maryland Natural Hazards Preparedness Guide is available for Download here (PDF).  See page 19! Useful stuff there!

2) NOAA National Weather Service Homepage  and Current Weather Alerts

3) Here are some picts of the 2005 hurricane related work in SW LA. What, if any things do you see that could make a difference?

4) General reading on Debris Flow Hazards

5) Here is a list of all the local Emergency Offices by State, check your local office and know where it is located.

6) Be better prepared visit http://www.ready.gov.  How would you change this site so more people would prepare or share the information more effectively?  How would you communicate it better to your immediate circle of family and friends?

7) Buy a Red Cross certified already made emergency preparedness  kit (I know the owner as I met him at a Gov Conference in 2007) His is a service disabled veteran owned business, which I also support our vets!

8) Visit the Maryland Emergency Management Agency or your state’s own page

9) Sign Up for CAPALERT if you live or work in the DC area. Be among the first to know about emergencies

I would be interested to know what your creative and 0r useful ideas are! Really!!

I encourage you to commit a weekend to updating telephone numbers, buying emergency supplies and reviewing your emergency plan with everyone. Make an online plan here and print it out and give it to your family  members

What is the ROI of a conversation?

October 16, 2010 2 comments

I hope you all don’t mind if I play in the sand box a bit with a bunch of various thoughts.  How do you measure the value of a conversation or multiple ongoing conversations as citizen engagement?  Do you liken it to the cost per minute …of say a cell phone call?  Or by some other standard? Complicated at best, ehhh?

Physically engaging, talking online or offline, and then any resulting future actions are all different forms of engagement. Right? Defining variouls levels of engagement might be a first step.

Although there’s no standized formula quite yet for measuring the ROI of word-of-mouth (WOM) or social marketing, there are some factors to consider.

The seeds have been firmly planted through press coverage, trend reports and media analysis; buzz builders are among us; governement, businesses and marketers are all drinking the word-of-mouth Diet Mt. Dew version. In particular, word-of-mouth or citizen engagement has proven to be a valuable way to reach the over-stimulated, ever-changing, often elusive, yet ready-and-able-to-spend 13- to 25-year-old audience. Media buyers and marketers alike are scrambling to get an aggregated WOM engagement measurement program while it’s hot, but are constantly dealing with one small hiccup.

Nobody is quite sure how much it is valued or what it costs, in resources and time, etc. etc. etc.

“What is the value of a conversation?” is a common and fair question. We do this in the communications industry for example, a discipline marked by numbers and formulas developed to justify media spends so many dollars per column inch.

As 360-degree marketing and communications straddles aggregation of analytics and social behavior, the keepers of the budgetary keys are trying to figure out what to pencil into the value of the elusive word of mouth (WOM) engagement line.

Essentially, online social media listening and offline word of mouth tracking have essentially been two parallel universes.

Similarly, media buying agencies know how to calculate the value of a banner ads, pint column inches, broadcast radio and TV…which in part takes into account the number of eyeballs or ears seeing the ad, whose eyeballs they are, what/where the content is placed.

Is there a standard formula for word-of-mouth? Not yet, but I think we are getting closer in the communications industry.

Methodologies were previously being developed to try to figure out the value of conversations on a CPM basis.  I don’t think that will worked so well. Why? Well how do you measure some of the following components of engaged people based conversations?

Authenticity

Whose word is more valuable — Britney Spears’ or your best friend’s? If one of my colleagues tells me she loved ‘Spanglish,’ but the New York Times tells me it’s more vapid than ‘Daredevil,’ who am I more apt to believe? Depends on your personal lense/frame of reference. The first way to value a word-of-mouth interaction is by considering its relevance to the individual. The more honest, pure and trusted the conversation is, the stronger the impact.  All of these interactions may be valuable, but their interactions are valued differently.

Connectivity

According to research conducted by the Consumer Electronics Association in December 2004, 72 percent of teens wanted what their friends have ( I don’t think that behavior has changed to much over time) So, it’s worth a lot to inspire a conversation between two people who have a lot of friends, isn’t it?

Media buyers ask themselves, if Nike can reach the quarterback of the football team right before practice with a message about a new high-performance cleat, how many banner ads does this equal? Within the word-of-mouth industry, marketers have a range of methods for identifying the most connected, most active, most influential individuals in a group. As an industry, we’re striving to articulate our methods clearly so they can indeed contribute to the valuation of the conversation.

Context

In order for a conversation to make sense, it must be contextually relevant. Think about it, if you’re a teenager hanging out on gaming sites all day long, you’re much more apt to talk to your friends about a new artist with a track in your favorite game than a new sandwich at Burger King. As marketing and communcations professional we are trying to place a value on a conversation, it’s vital to consider where, how and for how long the conversation is taking place. The conversation over time. Are people mentioning the product in passing or raving about it in their blogs? Are they in an environment where a purchasing decision is top-of-mind? Is the content consistent with the context?  How long does the context of a message last?

Medium

If the communicator is the same, are conversations in person still considered more valuable than conversations taking place over the phone, on blogs, in print, in a social network such as this?  Are people generally more engaging face-to-face than they are on the phone?The same could be said of phone conversations vs. online chats. Email endorsements are great, but on the whole are they less of an impact and therefore, less valuable than verbal conversations? Online conversations?

Or are we just getting mired down in to much blah, blah, blah in trying to figure out the $$$ value of an engaging converation?

The industry seems to not have developed a formula to value conversations, until maybe just recently.

I can’t tell you to take three parts authenticity, one part connectivity and 1.5 parts content and multiply it by a $30 CPM to figure out your ROI, but at least we’re closer, as an industry, to figuring out what the formula’s ingredients are. As a whole in the communications industry, we need to pay close attention to: authenticity — who is talking to whom and for what reasons, connectivity — how many conversations actually occur, context — why is a given community talking about your product, and lastly, medium — where are these conversations happening?
As a test, right here …right now what I would like to propose to you all to do  is apply some ROI to this entire debate, and the extended word of mouth converation? How might you do so?

Try to quantify the bottom-line value of each conversation with some new out of the “box” thinking.

Value of time, the number of people engages and the unique referrals or action over time across all social media channels.

For exampl,e if you take a persons “life expereicne value” with some number across the outreach timeframe with some kind of diminishing generations of time and denote it by a depreciated value over time (Generation 0, Gen 1, Gen 2, Gen 3, Gen 4 value). this takes into consideration one person’s  LTV across a time continum of some sort…

The WOM inputs are collected/aggregated by some sort of <b>Chatter Box</b> analytics platform.
See the chatter boxes I built to track certain engaged conversational topics using OMGili.com to see what I am generally talking about. http://unlimitedpr.net/BuzzTopics.html

The inputs potentially would be generated by some rate value (i.e the number of people told from Generation 0 to Generation 1, Generation 1 to Generation 2, etc.), which is a measure of reach, as well as generational “value”/purchase/ad rate (the percentage of people who report engaging, doing, or acting, orpurchasing the product or service at each generation). In theory, I could input in to those topics a informational link to materials for the public and watch my buzz metric meter to see if people engage and how many over time,, and track the actual link from Bit.ly as well

The value of each conversation, or “conversation value”, could calculated by combining the life time value ( in my chatter box examples, over 3 days, 7 days or 30 days…or longer monthly, semi annually, annually) and WOM referrals value and dividing this by the number of conversations with the unque number of people who engaged.

The “net present conversation value” would be then computed by subtracting what ever the costs for the marketing/HR/Outreach initiative  were to develop by both direct labor cost and indirect labor costs from the conversation value figure.

You end up with a dollar amount, like $1.20, for example, and this number means that each time a person had a conversation with a new person as part of a marketing/communication or outreach initiative (whether it’s an advocacy or influencer WOM program, or a more traditional event marketing or sampling program) the company made or got an ROI of  $1.20.

The value could be a negative number as well which means the initiative failed to generate a positive ROI. Companies can track this number over time and work to optimize their initiatives in order to increase their engagement or conversation value.

I am thinking out loud btw with all of this…and I have loosely followed this subject with some interest since about 2005 or 2006.

I end with the fact that this rambling what I posted about is not my original thinking.  And, this concept has evolved….of course over time….(no pun intended).

And, indeed there are aggreation social media tools now and what is needed is concept is some algorythm or ap to do it.

I do believe there are finally a couple of firms out there who are doing just that, which I recently came across.

Even with the growing proliferation of online social media and the mobilution conversations, an estimated 80 percent of word of mouth still occurs offline….but there does also appear to be a relatively new mobile-enabled media tracking solution that allows real-time measurement of consumer exposure to any type of brand touchpoint, including word-of-mouth and traditional media.

Fresh News Tidbits from Media Bistro.com

August 20, 2010 3 comments

Original Source: http://www.mediabistro.com/news/newsfeed

NPR’s Hour-By-Hour Audience By Platform (NPR)
Wonder what NPR’s audience looks like by the hour? They compiled information to see how their audience engages with NPR content on an average weekday, Saturday, and Sunday across all platforms. During the week, NPR programming on the air is consumed most during the morning and evening “drive times.” NPR.org, on the other hand, has the most users during the day. As for mobile platforms, the NPR News iPhone app has a slight bump in traffic in the mid-morning and evens out throughout the day.

Facebook Places: What It Means For Media Brands (eMediaVitals)
Instead of simply taking the best of Gowalla and Foursquare’s features, Facebook is opening up its platform for developers via an API. Launch partners Yelp, Foursquare and Gowalla all discussed how their apps will now interface with the Facebook API. Media companies can begin integrating this API into their own mobile apps. There’s even a B2B application. WebNewser: Foursquare might be quaking in its boots following the launch of Facebook Places, but executives from Google and Twitter speaking at the 140 Characters Conference in San Francisco said the new service signals the “mainstreaming” of “check-in” behavior — and that’s a good thing. “Check-in is becoming more and more of a core action,” said Othman Laraki, Twitter’s director for geo-location and search features.

Time Inc. Breaks The iPad Logjam (Fortune)
The People app may signal the end of a four-and-a-half-month impasse that put the digital dreams of every major magazine publisher on hold. Until now, the iPad versions of People, Time, Sports Illustrated and Fortune have cost the same as the newsstand price, even if you were already paying to get the paper edition in the mail. That changed with this week’s People iPad app, which is, for the first time, free to the magazine’s subscribers.

Get Ready For Ads In Books (WSJ)
With e-reader prices dropping like a stone and major tech players jumping into the book retail business, what room is left for publishers’ profits? The surprising answer: ads. They’re coming soon to a book near you. To understand why this is inevitable, consider the past few years. The historically staid and technology-averse publishing ecosystem has been ripped apart and transformed.

GalleyCat: On Thursday, publishing folk around the Twitter-sphere debated one question all day: Should we put advertisements in books? Movable Type Literary Group founder Jason Ashlock started the Twitter hashtag “adsinbooks” by writing: “About this advertising in books idea. Is it really that bad? Obv we don’t want it to disrupt the reading experience, but … Isn’t there a way to incorporate select, tasteful adverts that provide revenue, appeal to readers sensibilities?”

No News At The New York Times Magazine (WWD)
The proposals are in to executive editor Bill Keller, but that’s as far as The New York Times has gotten in the process of finding a successor for Gerry Marzorati, the editor of the Times‘ Sunday magazine. In late June, Marzorati was reassigned by Keller to a newly created, amorphous position at the company. At the time, Keller said he would be accepting applications for the job via e-mail through July 31 and that Marzorati would stay on as editor through the end of the summer. Now, sources say that Keller and Co. haven’t begun to meet with candidates and are hoping to name a successor by the end of next month.

What Exactly Is Augmented Reality? (Folio:)
A growing number of magazines over the last several months have tapped into augmented reality with the goal of expanding the traditional print content experience with web-based video or other electronic delivery. But, what’s the difference between, say, Popular Science‘s interactive 3-D turbine and TONY Kids‘ video? Is one AR and the other just 2-D image recognition? What exactly is augmented reality?

Gannett Debuts School Sports Microsites (B&C)

Gannett is launching more than 100 co-branded local sports sites out of its HighSchoolSports.net division. Gannett says the “microsites,” a joint operation between Gannett’s TV, newspaper and web outfits, are expected to reach 9.4 million unique monthly visitors. The venture debuts this month in 38 Gannett markets, including Atlanta, Washington, DC and Denver. The rest of the Gannett markets will have the sites in place by the end of the year.

Gawker’s No Longer A Blog (TheWrap)
Gawker is no longer a blog. And Nick Denton no longer runs a blog network. The logic, according to a couple of people with knowledge of the company’s plans, is that they’ve largely outgrown the blog format, with new visitors entering and exiting its sites without seeing “the big story” of the day — stories that can attract and retain new readers. The idea is to showcase the most appealing stories, not merely the latest, for the 17 million people (on average) visiting its network in the U.S. each month.

Beyond The Barcode: Combining Print And Mobile Platforms (Folio:)

Advertisers can customize the message they want to send to consumers with Pongr, a technology that’s been used by Marie Claire and for b2b applications as well, including a company selling $350,000 tractors. “All that customer wanted was a return that said ‘Click here to talk to a representative immediately,’” says Pongr senior vice president of sales Wright Ferguson Jr. “That makes sense when you’re talking about an extremely detailed, high ticket item.”

from mediabistro.com’s blogs:

chromeos-tablet.jpg

eBookNewser: Google & Verizon Rumored to Launch Tablet in November
WebNewser: Kelly Wallace Talks About Making the Jump to New Media
TVNewser: Brian Williams: Katie Couric ‘Always Welcome’ at NBC
PRNewser: PondelWilkinson Picks Up George Medici
FishbowlNY: Fareed Zakaria Joins Time Magazine
FishbowlDC: Best Story Pitch of the Day?
FishbowlLA: LiLo To Make A Cool Million for Her First Post-Jail Interview?
GalleyCat: Facebook Your New or Upcoming Book
MediaJobsDaily: How To Spice Up Your Resume, Socially
UnBeige: Finalists’ Design Plans Released for St. Louis Arch Competition
AgencySpy: McCann Responds to Mad Men Dis
MobileContentToday: RIM BlackBerry Bad News Piling Up. Is RIM the Next Nokia?
SocialTimes: Columbia Grad Wants To Sue Anonymous YouTube User Over Video Comments
AllFacebook: The One Reason Your Facebook Page Strategy Doesn’t Work

Examples of Good Web 2.0 Newsrooms

March 15, 2010 Comments off

  After my most recent post about newroom 2.0 make over tips, I’d now like to emphasize that there is a legitimate need to change towards the use of social media as part of your communication strategy.

 Therefore, I went looking for good examples of Web 2.0 newsrooms to share with others. It is evident that social media has/is changing how the new-release structure and functionality is performed.    If done correctly, then feasibly, one is able to go farther and cheaper in the social media world.  This  inturn is creating a paradigm shift in power,  transitioning from large conglomerated brands  and shifting over to individuals, services and integration of the business world down to the street level through the new virtualized social landscape.   Therefore, I say jump in and get your feet wet with your own newsroom 2.0, personally.

 Below is a short list for you to take a look at for consideration, for comparison, and for ideas for your own social media enabled newsroom 2.0 planning.  Ultimately, you want to attract, interact and enhance the journalist’s online experience. I understood that there might be many journalists who are not ready for, nor understand 2.0 yet. And, that’s ok. But, here are a few of my suggestions a few business selections and actual news outlets. I really like Scannia’s page. Which one’s do you like best and why? Got another suggestion, post a comment for us to see other good examples and explain why you think they make good Web 2.0 newsrooms.

 Example #1: Topix.com

Example #2 : Scannia

Example #3: Google News

Example #4: AOL News

Example #3: Ford

Example #4: Cisco

Example #4: Accenture

Example #5 : CNN US

 I am looking for a few good government 2.0 newsroom examples as well.

Got a suggestion let me know!

 Stay tuned next for social news release examples.

Newsroom 2.0 Makeover Tips

March 4, 2010 2 comments

Do you need an eXtreme MarCom 2.0 makeover for your online news page(s)?  Well, below are some tips for strategic consideration.

Public relations and marketing is all about the conversation and engagement, these days. Right?

And, depending on which camp you are in; communications, marketing or both, you can more effectively enable the “conversation” by shaping opinion, and opening the door towards selling the products, services and information you offer through MarCom 2.0.

MarCom 2.0 offers new ways to do business.  An evolved and matured communications model is continuous communications, strategically integrated across multiple channels. Consider, that if you are not part of where and how the new conversation is taking place then you could be missing huge opportunities with the advent of Now PR and the changing social media landscape.

In putting the cards on the table, I preface this post with the following obvious statements. And, I will never discount or dismiss that:

  1. Face-to face communication and personal relationship building is still very important and relevant.
  2. Research is key to excellent communication, marketing and business success.
  3. Traditional PR ethics, and methods still have significant value.

But, the times and new technologies are forcing us to change how we converse. And, it is time to consider restrategizing how to make use of MarCom 2.0 tools, and Internet enabled audiences by going where the people are located.

Key to your strategic planning questions, “Who are Your 2.0 Influencers?”  (Here is a  semi-relevant article, GovTech’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers of 2010).

I assume,  if you are a PR, MarCom, marketing or communication professional, that your goal is to help the media, your constituents and your key influencers to do their job more efficiently to achieve your overall communication and business goals.  More, to the point, drive traffic, shape opinion, create change, win more business and win more clients with consistent continuous integrated communications.

The Internet never sleeps and it transcends all business time zones and media deadlines, 24/7/365, no matter where you are.

Hence, the term Now PR.

An online corporate newsroom with stagnant content and a lack of adequate media “engagement” could be minimizing your ability to sway public opinion, increase awareness about your products and services or simply marginalizing your ability to win new business.

I provide the following analogies purely for contextual consideration (and for some fun):

  1.  Would you still use a scythe, hay rack, horse and a single fixed steel plow blade, harrowing disks to “cultivate and harvest” or would you use a modern combines and ???  Wait, let me make the analogy more relevant to communications.
  2. Would you use a Gutenberg press, telegraph/tele-type, the linotype machine, or the typewriter  to issue your Brand, messaging  or news to those “harvesting” information about your company these days?  My, my, my we sure have come a long way.  We have so many more channels to chose from.  Bull horns are still optional, as well.

If you use one antiquated method, tactic, tool or channel you could be missing the boat. You do not have to swallow the entire elephant at one time. But, I preface, if you are not strategically  instituting incremental changes in moving towards communication 2.0, then you could be presenting your brand, your corporation or your agency as an out dated Linotype machine that it operates at a slow technological pace versus current day new media and other MarCom professionals who require new media formats and newer interactive elements. And, if well planned your Internet newsrooms can serve to meet many MarCom needs.

If you’ve built your online newsroom, and realize that your corporation, small business, organization, agency and/or Brand needs a makeover then the following tips can help in moving you towards making use of some new tools, new standards and evolving new interactive communication best practices to attract media,

Journalists, editors, and new business prospects require the basic nuts and bolts about who you are, what you do and how you do it. Before beginning your strategic communication 2.0 makeover, please make sure that you have the core communication basics covered by incorporating:

  1.  Your public relations/media contacts (who is your key editorial/media voice for your CEO & Company?
  2. Company basic facts
  3. Perspective on the industry/Your target business sectors/events/issues
  4. High resolution images for downloading/use by media (executive images, salient other images)
  5. Updated financial information ( private companies would not do so, but may provide a one pager on percent of growth, general sales/revenues and growth goals and growth direction
  6. Archived news releases by date ( possibly by key words as well)

Here are a some next steps for strategic communication 2.0 planning consideration:

  1.  If you are operating on limited funds, you might consider using some free resources already widely in practice on the Internet and even free open source and multi-platform distribution tools to save money and time (YouTube, Yahoo! News, Google News, Topix.com, bit.ly, Twitter, Facebook, Digg, Ping.fim, SlideShare, IM Tools, Tubemogul and many others).
  2. Give your news room “legs” by enabling it to be more virtual, more viral and more mobile.
  3. Plan to incorporate Really Simple Syndication (RSS), Multi-media Syndication (MMS), and ShareThis.
  4. Incorporate an advanced search tool for news release archive, executive bios, E-press kits, key words.
  5. Further consider arranging your contacts by your line of business verticals, capability, growth/industry sector. You may want to also provide executive social media bios, consider offering speeches, presentations, a relevant and timely short video snippet, quotes and sector remarks.
  6. Incorporate Technorati’s functionality, it searches, tracks and organizes top blogs by topic and records timely up-to-date links relative to your subject matter/sector (technorati.com/about)
  7. White papers and research findings, and real-time subject/industry buzz metric graphs.
  8. Product and Service information.
  9. Provide an e-2.0, email,  status update bar, media content update functionality or Twitter alert functionality for media, editors, constituents, and journalists.
  10. E-press kits ( for core lines of business, events, initiatives & issues).
  11. For enhanced SEO/SEM, VSEM/VSEO, strategically build, use and replicate key word meta tags/cloud tags, alt tags and meta descriptions across multiple channels, within your back-end newsroom source code, videos, E-press kits, graphics, speeches, events, blogs and pictures.
  12. Create a multimedia library (High resolution photo library, video library, B-roll library, MP3 files).
  13. Create external links/iconic image links to other key social networks where your business and executives maybe networking (Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, LinkedIn).
  14. Seriously consider your Twitter strategy and it’s value to your business.
  15. Link or steam media past, current or related industry coverage by using Digg.com and del.icio.us.
  16. Implement a new press release template, a social media news release (Stay tuned for from my next blog post on this topic). This new press release format should enable your intended targets, constituents, and media garner the information, materials, and interactive media from within the news release itself to allow them to more easily create that earned media story more efficiently.

These are just a few thoughts for strategically planning a MarCom 2.0 makeover.

Let me know what you think?

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