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All Things Twitterfied

April 23, 2012 3 comments

I  believe this is the best, most complete and accurate list of valuable Twitter applications available on the internet, which I am re-blogging, with many thanks, to Eric Goldstein.  I hope it is useful to others!

To be fair, I absolutely have merged and plagiarized other older and outdated lists that I found (the larger ones are credited below).  However, I spent a good deal of time cleaning out the dead applications, I will try and update this list over time, but you can be assured that as of May, 2011, every site on this list has been tested and is up and running (or tagged as being in beta/alpha).  I don’t guarantee that the apps all work, but the sites were definitely up and running.  Please e-mail me or add a comment with any new apps or corrections you find that you’d like me to add.

Simple Web Based Clients and Twitter Viewing Tools

  1. Twitter.com (*):  Can’t go wrong with this — web, iPhone, etc.
  2. Twalala: On-line browser beta Twitter tool that allows you to filter out / mute tweets you wish to ignore.
  3. Hahlo: Another good web based and iPhone optimized site where you can view tweets and tweet.
  4. iTweet:  Similar to Hahlo – auto updates.
  5. TwitStat: Mobile web client (supposedly has analytics, but I didn’t see it)
  6. Dabr.co.uk : Another mobile web client
  7. Splitweet:  allows multi account Twitter management.
  8. Twimbow:  In alpha, but seems like an interesting web based browser if you can get an account.
  9. TweetVisor:  Interesting new activity based web twitter client
  10. Twazzup Reader:  Good web based Twitter Client
  11. Accessible Twitter:  Twitter UI optimized for disabled users and intended to be easier to read.
  12. Qwitter Client:  Accessible Twitter client designed for access by the blind via a user’s screen reader.

Directory And Top User Search Tools

  1. Just Tweet It: A twitter directory sorted by interest 
  2. Twitaholic: Similar to WeFollow – Lists top 1000 Twitter Users by followers.
  3. FameCount:  Active users on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube
  4. Twitrank: List of top 150 Twitter Users By Followers, People They’re Following, and updates 
  5. Twellow (*): The Twitter Yellow Pages — Find people by area of expertise. 
  6. We Follow: Find celebrities and follow-up people and key areas of expertise.
  7. Tweetfind:  Twitter Directory with Social Listings, Twitter Lists & Tools
  8. TwitterPacks : Answers the question: If someone were joining Twitter today, who might they follow?
  9. Start4all:   Directory of Twitter related web pages
  10. FollowerWonk:  Search Twitter Profiles By Keywords / Sentences.  Can compare two users as well for overlap
  11. Twiends:  Tool to grow your Twitter / Facebook / YouTube following by trading likes.
  12. Fan Page List: Social media directory of Twitter & Facebook Brands / Celebrities / etc.
  13. Increasr: Very similar to Twiends, a Twitter follower tool
  14. FollowFriday.com:  Ranking of the most recommended Tweeps
  15. FriendLynx:   Find Your Facebook Friends On Twitter
  16. FilterTweeps:  Advanced Tweeps Search Engine
  17. Resonances:  Influential Tweeps Directory
  18. Local Follow: Tweeps Search Engine

Track The Latest Trends and Tags

  1. Hashtags (uses Trendistic data): Shows graphical 7 day trend on keywords and names of people that used that keyword.
  2. Serendipitwiterrous: Search for tweets of a certain person using certain keywords
  3. Trendistic (*): See trends in Twitter – trending tags, 24 hour, 7/30/90/180 day graphs 
  4. Twitscoop: See key trends and events on Twitter — post Tweets in response.
  5. TwitLinks:  The latest links from the worlds top tech twitter users.
  6. Tweet Scan: Show top and search keywords.
  7. Tweetmeme (*): Good site to see the latest and hottest stories / images.
  8. Twemes: Worldwide tags & Trends (Twemes)
  9. Monitter:  Twitter monitor which watches up to 3 keywords in separate columns in real time.
  10. Twistori: Quirky live stream of Tweets showing loves, hates, believes, wishes, etc.
  11. Twitturls: Find out the latest URLs posted on Twitter
  12. Twitturly: Similar to Tweetmeme – latest and hottest stories / images.
  13. Twendz:   Explores Twitter Conversations and Sentiment
  14. Topsy:  Real Time Search For Twitter
  15. Sulia:  The Interest Network – See top headlines.
  16. Favstar: Favorite funny tweets
  17. Twazzup:  Realtime search results from Twitter
  18. hashMASH: Finds and sorts similar hashtags based upon activity
  19. SearchHash: Download range of tweets based upon hashtag
  20. Hashtagify.me:  Explore Twitter Hashtags and their relationships

Segmentation and List Grouping Tools

  1. Formulists (*):  An excellent app that will help built personal lists for you based upon certain criteria / keywords.
  2. Group Tweet: Tweet with only a particular group of people 
  3. Crowd Status: Create and find out the status of a certain group of people on Twitter 
  4. Twitter Groups: Tag your followers into different groups.  Send a message to the entire group at once.
  5. Triberr:  Interesting site that will retweet everything in the groups you join.

Twitter Utilities

  1. bit.ly (*):  The King URL shortener – many twitter apps use bit.ly directly or can leverage their bookmarklets
  2. Ping.fm (*): Extremely valuable service that lets you publish your updates to many social networks at one time.
  3. Visibli: Nice engagement bar that shows your brand above links you share.   Also has analytics.
  4. Tweet Burner: Track the links that you post on Twitter – URL Shortner
  5. Twitter Split: Interesting script / tool you can install to allow you to track links in tweets you post.
  6. TrueTwit (F/$):  A Twitter validation tool that helps automate some key services.   Free and paid services are useful.
  7. Twit Longer:   Allows you to send longer Tweets
  8. Twitter Keys: Blog Post & Bookmarklet with little icons & images you can add into your tweets.
  9. Mokumax:   Nice free app to schedule branded tweets
  10. TwimeMachine:  Way to see all your past Tweets
  11. Follow Friday Helper (*):  Let’s you easily build thank you & other messages to people who mention, RT, etc. you.

Integrate Twitter with Files, Images and Videos

  1. Twitpic (*): Share photos
  2. Twitvid (*):  Share photos and videos
  3. Autopostr: Update your Twitter when you post a Flickr picture – In Beta, no invites available.
  4. Twixr: Share pictures on Twitter via your mobile phone
  5. Twixxer: Share photos and videos on Twitter
  6. MobyPictures:  Share your images across multiple sites including Twitter

Twitter Background Sites

  1. Twilk ($) (*):  Cool site that Create a background image of all your followers / who you follow.  Paid takes out advertising
  2. Twitrounds:   Another Free Twitter Background Tool
  3. TwitbacksCreate free twitter backgrounds.
  4. Free Twitter Designer  : Free Tool To Design a Twitter Background
  5. Twitter Images:  More free images
  6. Twitter Backgrounds.org:   MORE free images
  7. Twit Background Images.com:  MORE
  8. Twitr Backgrounds:  and more.
  9. Twitpaper:  More.
  10. Free Twitter Layout:  oh, and more
  11. Tweativity: Windows based app for Twitter backgrounds.

Summarized Reports / Digests Of Social Activity

  1. Gist (*):  A great app that tracks activity and tweets for your contacts across all social platforms.   Integration with Outlook, iPhone, Android, and more.   Definitely worth a look.
  2. Nutshell Mail:  Delivers a nice daily e-mail report of your Twitter, Facebook, and Social Media Activity.
  3. Twilert (*):   A good free app that will provide a daily digest of tweets via e-mail of search terms & people
  4. Tweet Beep ($): Keep track of conversations that mention you, your products, your company, anything, with hourly updates via keyword tracking.
  5. Stream Spigot: Creates a digest of tweets for a person or list delivered via RSS or a web page you can visit daily.
  6. Social Oomph  (*): This is also listed below as a paid app, but the free version gives you a nice daily summary of Twitter Activity by keyword / user.
  7. ChiliTweets ($):  Finds “hot” links and tweets and aggregates them for you

Cool Ways To See Your Tweets And Followers

  1. TwitterFountain (*):  Very cool way to view tweets by person/ keyword in real time on big screen (trade shows & events).
  2. TwitterCamp Nice way to view tweets on a big screen or monitor
  3. Twit100: Provides a unique view of the last 100 tweets from your followers.
  4. TwitArcs: Interesting visualization tool to see how a user’s tweets are connected
  5. Twitter Spectrum: Visualization tool that shows how two keywords are connected via Twitter keywords.
  6. TwitterBrowser:  Lets you browse ones friends graphically.
  7. Twitterfall:  An interesting real time browser of Twitter activity by keyword / user / etc.
  8. Twylah: An on-lin Flipboard type view of your Tweets.   In Request only Beta – Here is mine.
  9. MentionMap:  Very interesting “mindmap” type view of mentions by username.

Follower / Unfollower Tools

  1. Does Follow: Simple tool to see if one person follows another person.
  2. Manage Flitter ($):  Clean up and manage your followers.  Also has some analytic stuff.
  3. Tweeter Karma: See who you are following that is not following you and visa versa.   Can mass follow those you don’t follow.
  4. Qwitter ($): Get a daily report showing unfollowers.   (I could not get this to deliver info to me)
  5. Twerp Scan: Interesting way to drill down into who you or your followers are following.
  6. Twitspam: Track and Report Twitter / Social Network spammers
  7. Is Now Following:  Tracks when you add new followers and tweets it
  8. Fllwrs:  Keep track of your followers / Unfollowers
  9. Twitoria:  Shows activity of the people you’re following to stop if they haven’t tweeted in a while.
  10. FollowCost:  What’s it “cost” to follow someone (how frequently do they update / tweet)?
  11. Just Unfollow:   Unfollow those that are not following you.
  12. IsFollow:  Find out who is following who by entering in two usernames.
  13. Tweet Find Tools:  Good free tool to unfollow people that don’t follow you.  Also has tweet scheduler
  14. Friend or Follow:  Another app to see who doesn’t follow you and visa versa.
  15. Tweepi: Another list cleanser
  16. Who Unfollowed Me: Find out who unfollowed you.

Twitter Account Analysis tools

  1. TwentyFeet (F/$) (*):  Excellent summary of stats across multiple sites.   First Twitter & Facebook account are free.
  2. Klout (*):  An excellent app to track and rate your social media activities (Facebook & Twitter, LinkedIn to follow).
  3. Empire Avenue:  Similar to Klout – only more complicated with a “virtual investment game” built in.
  4. Crowd Booster:  Another good analytic tool
  5. Peer Index:  Another good analytic tool
  6. My Tweeple ($): Twitter Account Evaluation Tool.  Follower counts, ratios, tweet counts.  Review Recent Tweets (See what your followers are saying), Follow-back, hide or block new followers.  Create Tags, Notes, and Share.  Good tool to export your entire follower list to a csv file.
  7. Twitter Counter: Good Twitter Analytics / Comparison & Statistic Tool.  Also has some good blog scripts and Twitter Tools
  8. Twitter Grader: Analyses your Twitter account on a 0-100 score. Computed based on how complete your profile is as well as the number and influence of your followers.  Also shows top users in categories.  Good basic stats.
  9. Tweet Stats: Graphical representation of your Twitter activity including time of day posting, interface used, etc.
  10. Tweeple Twak (in alpha): Supposedly track your friend gains and declines.  Site is up, but can’t see what it does.
  11. Twit Graph: Similar to TweetStats, but weaker and has more advertising
  12. Twoolr:  Another Twitter Analytic Tool
  13. Twitter Ratio: Find out your friend to follower ratio.
  14. Retweet Rank:  Provides a ranking on the number of Retweets You Have
  15. See Tweeb and SocialDash Under the iPhone Apps section for a few good iPhone Apps that provide statistics
  16. The Social List:  Ranking Tool to compare yourself to others via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and 4sq
  17. SocialBro:  A very interesting new desktop app to look at Twitter Statistics – in Beta, but very cool.

Business Social / Twitter Suites & Tools

  1. MessageMaker ($$) (**):  A shameless plug for my company’s (One To One Global) product that is designed for organizations and companies to deliver messages to tens, hundreds, or thousands of social endpoints (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and then provide amazing aggregated reporting.  Fantastic for companies with multiple brands, franchises, and organizations looking to leverage their sales team’s or employees.  Contact me if you’re interested in learning more.
  2. Pluggio ($) (**):  One of my favorite personal apps to help find valuable content, schedule tweets, and get reports on your activity.   Free version is ok, paid version is justified.
  3. Tweet Adder ($) (**):  PC & Mac tool to help build a targeted list of followers and un-follow those those that don’t follow you back.   Sends thank you messages to new followers.   On my must have list.
  4. NEW: Tweet Attack ($) (*) :  Similar to Tweet Adder, but seems like it brings some new things to the table.   I included a discount link I found.
  5. Tweet Whistle ($):  Similar to Tweet Adder as well.  Mac and PC version to build your followers.
  6. Twittenator ($):  Similar to Tweet Adder.   Seems solid, I’ve just become used to the other.
  7. Sprout Social (F/$) (*):  Easy to use dashboard to manage your social efforts with attractive analytics.
  8. Social Oomph ($$) (*): A complete Twitter Automation and Analytic Tool.   Free version also very valuable for keyword analysis reports, follow backs, and reporting.
  9. Timely:  An interesting app that analyzes and schedules Tweets based upon the best time to deliver them
  10. Tweetag: Browse tweets via tags and receive e-mail notifications.
  11. Tap11 ($):  Real-Time Intelligence and Engagement Platform for Twitter & Facebook
  12. Twaitter ($):  Social Media Suite handling scheduling of tweets, statistics, other info.
  13. Twollo ($):  Targeted follower building tool based on keywords with auto-follow
  14. BufferApp ($):   Similar to Pluggio in that you can build a targeted list of tweets that it will intelligently deliver over the course of the day.
  15. Radian6 ($$):  Very valuable monitoring and Analytic Tool
  16. TweetBig ($):   Another good suite with auto follow-back, tweet scheduling, analytics, and other stuff.
  17. CoTweet (F/$):  Tool to help empower teams to monitor and engage with customers across multiple accounts
  18. Mutual Mind.com ($):  An enterprise level social media management platform
  19. TweetSpinner (F/$):  Manages followers, rotates profiles, archives and schedules tweets.
  20. TweetBot / Tweet Scope:   Similar to Tweet Adder – with auto unfollow and DM capabilities.

Twitter Integration With Your Site or Blog

  1. Add Tweets: Make Twitter Update Widgets for site or blog using javascript 
  2. Feed Tweeter: integrate Twitter with Plurk, your blog and delicious
  3. Follow Me On Twitter Buttons: Follow me on twitter buttons
  4. Loudtwitter: Ships your tweets to your blog.
  5. PingTwitter: Automatically update your Twitter Account when you publish a new blog pos
  6. Siah Design: Free Twitter buttons and animated GIFs you can use.
  7. Stammy’s RSS To Twitter: Not too many people have access to a Ruby-enabled server so the author decided to make a simple PHP script to get the job done.
  8.  Twignature: A decent translated Japanese app to take your username and create a usable Twitter signature for websites & e-mail.
  9. Twit This: Add this option so people can easily tweet information from your site or blog
  10. Twitter Tools: A wordpress plugin that lets you integrate Twitter with your blog. You can send your updates to your blog as well as create tweets directly from your blog
  11. Twitter for WordPress: Script displays latest tweets on your blog
  12. Twitterfeed: Post your blog to Twitter through your RSS feed
  13. Twitter Updater: Automatically sends a Twitter status update to your Twitter account when you create, publish, or edit your WordPress post
  14. Twitter WordPress Sidebar Widget: A wordpress widget where you can send your tweets to your blog
  15. TwitGIF: A translated Japanese app that creates an animated GIF from your latest Tweets.
  16. Chirrup:  PHP Script that allows you to collect Twitter comments for your site.
  17. Dlvr.it:   Deliver Your Blog To Twitter, Facebook, and More
  18. DiggDigg:  One of many WordPress plugins that integrate social sites.

Twitter As An Organizer

  1. Remember the Milk: Manage tasks on Twitter as well as set notifications for yourself
  2. Twittercal: Integrate your Google Calendar with Twitter
  3. My Chores: Track your chores
  4. Planypus: Make plans and export them to Twitter

Polls and Surveys on Twitter

  1. Lazy Tweet: Find answers to your questions by posting “@lazyweb” or “@lazytweet”
  2. Twitter Answers: Another question site with a nice layout so you can easily get answers to your questions.
  3. Twitter Polldaddy ($): A complete poll and survey site that also offers Twitter Options.
  4. Twittpoll: Join some twitter polls and receive the results in 24 hours

Twitter Advertising Networks

  1. Twittad: Place advertisements on your profile
  2. Magpie: Advertise with 5 tweets and get paid
  3. TwitCash:  Scheme to make money on twitter

Twitter and Music

  1. Twittytunes / FoxyTunes: Tweet what you’re listening, watching or reading regardless what player you are using. 
  2. Blip.fm: Listen to music and tweet it to Twitter

Twitter Backup Utilities

  1. Tweetake (*): Backup your twitter account
  2. Twitter Safe: Another place where you can backup your account.
  3. Tweet Scan Backup:   Backs up your Twitter Info

Adobe Air Clients and Multi-Platform Clients

  1. Snitter 
  2. TweetDeck (*) : One of the best out there, free and definitely worth a look
  3. TweetPad visualizes statistics on the source of the incoming messages.
  4. Twhirl
  5. Twinja
  6. Pwytter
  7. Destroy Twitter

Twitter Tools For Mac

There are a million of these, so I’ll just list a few of the ones I use in addition to TweetDeck, Twitter, and Echofon that were mentioned elsewhere.   Open the Apple App Store and search for Twitter to find many more.

  1. Twitterrific:  ($) Paid Mac Client.
  2. YoruFukurou:   A good free app with multi-account support.
  3. Socialite ($):  Very powerful, not cheap ($19.99), but solid app that I got with a bundle one time.
  4. Twidget: A mac dashboard widget.
  5. Twittereeze is an extension to Twitterific. It allows you to set your iChat, Skype, Adium status to your twitter status.

Twitter Firefox & Other Plugins

  1. TweetStalk: A firefox addon that allows you to follow / stalk people without them knowing it.
  2. Hootbar (*): Formerlly Twitterbar, powerful way to post messages from address bar
  3.  Twitbin: A Firefox extension that allows you to post and receive tweets via the Sidebin.
  4. TwitterFox:  Sits in the status bar of Firefox. Send updates and keep an eye on your friends.
  5. Echofon For Firefox (*):  Another sidebin extension
  6. TwitterLine: A Headline Toolbar for Firefox
  7. Yoono (*): Supports updates to Twitter Facebook LinkedIn YouTube GTalk AIM
  8. Shareaholic (*): Share webpages with your friends on Twitter. Can be integrated with your Firefox Browser
  9. iTwitter: iGoogle gadget that have ping.fm, twitter videos, twitter news, twitter tips, twitter tools and more.

IPhone Apps

There are a million iPhone Twitter Apps, but here are a few of the ones I have and use.

  1. Tweetlogix ($) (*):  My favorite Iphone App – easy to manage multiple accounts, etc.
  2. Echofon (F/$) (*) : My second favorite
  3. qTweeter ($) (*):  Got to have a jailbroken iPhone, but an awesome app to quickly pull up an app and tweet images, video, location, etc.  Available via Cydia.
  4. Tweetdeck (*):  Along with Hootsuite, one of the most popular apps used today.
  5. Seesmic:  Nice app that allows you to easily log on to multiple Twitter, Facebook accounts.
  6. Hootsuite (*): One of the most popular tools out there.
  7. Boxcar: Good app that does push notifications for multiple social sites.
  8. Tweet-r 
  9. Twinkle
  10. Twitterific
  11. Twittelator (F/$)
  12. SocialDash (*):  One of the only iPhone Apps that provides access to Facebook and Twitter statistics on things like Klout.
  13. Tweeb:  A good iPhone app that provides Twitter account analysis (Tweets, Buzz, Clicks, etc.)
  14. Ubersocial:  Blackberry, iPhone, and beta Desktop App with great promise.
  15. TweetList:  A good Twitter Client (was recommended for disabled users)
  16. TeeWee:  Another decent free iPhone App recommended by a few.

Non-iPhone Mobile Device Twitter Clients

  1. ceTwit:  A windows mobile twitter client.
  2. JTwitter:  A java twitter client for mobile phones.
  3. Tiny Twitter:  A Java twitter client to send and receive tweets for mobile phones and devices.
  4. Twidroid (*):  An application for android mobiles.
  5. TwitterBerry:  Update and receive Tweets from your BlackBerry.

Windows & Misc.  Clients

  1. Mad Twitter: Built like Twitterific for Windows
  2. Twitterlicious:  Supports proxies, have a read-unread system and auto-refresh mechanism
  3. Twitux: GTK+Twitter Client
  4. Deskbar Twitter:  Update Twitter on Ubuntu
  5. Twippera: Twitter widget for Opera

Mobile Phone Applications With Twitter

  1. Dial2Do ($):  Use your voice to tweet as well as send text and do e-mail
  2. Vlingo ($) (*): iPhone, Android, Nokia, Windows Voice activated app
  3. Qik (*):  Share videos and Tweet (and e-mail) them across MANY phones
  4. Flix Wagon:  Similar to Qik – only for Android.

Integration With E-Mail / Messaging Applications

  1. Yahoo Messenger Twitter Sync Plugin: Integrate twitter with your Yahoo Messenger
  2. TikiTwit: Integrate Twitter with iChat
  3. Twittermail: Part of TwitterCounter – update twitter, send images, and longer tweets via email 
  4. Twinbox: Update Twitter with your Microsoft Outlook
  5. TwitEmail:  Allows twitter users to send HTML emails with attachments

Useless, Funny, & Misc. Twitter Sites

  1. Secret Tweet: Imagine PostSecret + Twitter. Tweet those secrets
  2. Curse Bird: Find out who’s swearing on Twitter
  3. Tweet What You Eat: Tweet what you’re eating at the moment – track your calories and weight
  4. Foodfeed: Similar to Tweet What You Eat, but just the tweet info
  5. Xbox 360 Gamer Tag:  Automatically update twitter with what you are playing at a certain moment
  6. Trackthis: Track your packages via Twitter with this tool
  7. Bkkeeper: Share what you’re reading on Twitter
  8. Commuter Feed: Share tweets on traffic and transit delays
  9. Foamee: Fun way to tracks who you owe coffee or beer to
  10. InnerTwitter: Signals you through chimes where you have to let go of your thoughts.
  11. Post like a Pirate: Talk like a pirate on twitter
  12. Roll the dice:  Give you the power to roll a dice on twitter. Useful when you’re betting or playing games with your friends.
  13. Xpenser:  Track your expenses with twitter
  14. Twithire:  The place where you can tweet job postings
  15. GasCalc: Tracks your gas usage and MPG on Twitter
  16. Fuel Frog ($): iPhone App with Twitter integration that also tracks Gas Usage and uses Twitter.
  17. Deal Tagger:  Shop and share on Twitter
  18. Textgasm: Tweet your secrets
  19. Twitter Nonsense: Daily Twitter Comic Strip
  20. Twitterbox:  A Twitter Client for Second Life
  21. Stocktwits:  Lets you follow stocks on Twitter. 
  22. Twictionary:  A repository for all sorts of words used on Twitter.
  23. TweetValue: Tells you how much your profile is worth in US dollars.
  24. MORE TWITTER GAMES:   I just found this lens on Squidoo that has a fairly up to date list of additional Twitter Games.

Once again, I credit the following posts for providing some of the information I used here. However, these posts are old, have many dead links and are missing many of the best new apps that are out there.

http://www.squidoo.com/twitterapps
http://eonlinetips.com/200-twitter-tools-list-even-your-mom-would-love-it/
Credit to the people on this LinkedIn Thread as well:
What are your favorite Twitter tools? | LinkedIn http://linkd.in/jUu6yX

Now that you have all these tools to use, be sure to follow me @unlimitedpr and continue to read my blog here.

List of Journalists Using Twitter

April 23, 2012 21 comments

UPDATED June 11, 2012:

IMPORTANT UPDATE # 1:   I sent a message to MediaOnTwitter & [@prsarahevansas on Twitter] to see if the Twitter media list is still available.  I had it listed here on my original blog post but now, it looks like it has moved or been completely removed.  And, Sarah Evans is now going by the name of Sarah’s Faves as of 2011. I also found that MediaOnTwitter resource has moved!  [And, maybe more than once since my original post]. Seems I can’t find the elusive Media on Twitter list anywhere right now. I will keep trying. The following is the last know information that I could find.

MediaOnTwitter, was powered by TrackVia’s online database, is/was the first shareable media database available to Twitter users. It is/was a free resource and media can be sorted by beat, location, name or media outlet. MediaOnTwitter is populated by Twitter users, vetted by editors and FREE to the entire community. Check out the database and add media to the list. The original MediaOnTwitter, developed by Sarah Evans, is a comprehensive tool supercharged by the support of TrackVia and supported by HARO founder, Peter Shankman.   People were pointed to the following URL stating they can now enter all media contacts at: http://www.trackvia.com/misc/media-database-submission.htm    But, it does not come up at all, now.

UPDATE#2: It is an election year and so I provide a link to the  The Top 20 Political Journalists on Twitter along with a few other updates I came across. Share and repost!

UPDATE#3: NYTimes Journalists on Twitter

UPDATE #4: Masterlist of UK Journalists on Twitter

UPDATE #5: AFP Journalists on Twitter [LAST UPDATED: May 17, 2012]. More and more AFP journalists are on Twitter, to the point where a simple old #FollowFriday is difficult, so If you’re on the list and your title wrong, or it;s left you off entirely, please let me know.  The same AFP list is on Twitter @ AFP_twitter. A public list by Grégoire Lemarchand of AFP journalists on Twitter (french, english, spanish…)

Update #6: Sourcing and networking with journalists. Need a source? Then follow Peter Shankman (@skydiver), founder of Help a Reporter Out, on Twitter. He’ll typically post tweets prefaced by UrgHARO: with instructions on the topic and how to respond. Help a Reporter Out touts more than 100,000 sources. HelpAReporter.com has a sign-up page in which sources can get up to three emails daily with 15 to 30 queries per email. Journalists submit their queries using an online form.

Update #6:  Tweet weekly with other journalists, bloggers, public relations or media types with #journchat. It’s 7 to 10 p.m. central time every Monday, and tweeps join by using the #journchat hashtag.

Update #7:

Clay Shirky is famous for having said “There is no such thing as information overload – there’s only filter failure.” Making sense of an overflowing Twitter stream is an ongoing act of curation – finding ways to follow just the most interesting readers, or to gather tweets that are relevant to your life or job.

While saved searches and hash tags provide a way to gather info from across Twitter by keyword, the Lists feature does the opposite – it gathers tweets from across the service by particular users, regardless the content of their tweets. Every Twitter user can create lists, add users to those lists, and can even track lists created by other users. As a journalist, you might create custom lists for:

  • Other journalists
  • Other publications
  • Journalists at your own publication
  • Community leaders
  • School leaders in your community
  • Economists
  • Data visualization experts
  • Sports reporters covering soccer leagues

You get the idea. Whatever your need or interest, you want to find people on Twitter with expertise in that area, and add them to a list.

Media People Using Twitter categorizes journalist by country and then lists their name, news organization and Twitter username. My Creative Team’s site said it can’t accept any more editors, but submissions and updates can be emailed. The Media People on Twitter wiki content can be downloaded into Microsoft Word document format.The Media Outlets Using Twitter wiki lists news organizations by country, company name and Twitter username or page URL.

Tweet weekly with other journalists, bloggers, public relations or media types with #journchat. It’s 7 to 10 p.m. central time every Monday, and tweeps join by using the #journchat hashtag.

(My Bio) Today media, journalists, writers, reporters, editors, correspondents, columnists are on Twitter.  Twitter is very quickly gaining momentum, support and market inertia and is on direct path to mainstream awareness, and not for just mindless tweets.  Twitter may just be the new telegraph wire.

I came across about seven seperate lists of journalist, editors, columnists who are on Twitter, and we all know in about five minutes this will morph into something newer, better, faster. But, until then, I thought this could be useful gathering point for many to many. And, it seems each list has names on them, but each may not be comprehensive. In time, the top dog will evolve. It is my hope that each one will be of help to communications and business professionals alike. I would take from any of these lists and create your own personal lists with a few of my suggestions directly below for consideration.

How PR Professionals Can Use Twitter Lists

  • Create a private list of journalists you want to follow or target with story ideas
  • Organize media contacts by geography, beat, past interaction, etc.
  • Create a list of media organizations, to keep tabs on current events or stories – for example, create a list of the top social media Twitter users

At best, it is a place to start to look at where and who is on Twitter. I imagine, eventually there will be an organic aggregated model that will take in all of these.

1) I personally think the first list is quite good becasue I can take this one and put it into spread sheet format, say for clients?  Media on Twitter. It is a real-time database you can update yourself.  Its only downside it that there is not a search feature to it. So you will have to use the find/replace option on your browser.

2) Then, there is MuckRack which has a little picture of each journalist, editor, reporter, columnist and anchor listed by publication

3) Cision’s JournalistTweets is the latest entry into the mix, also providing a directory of journalists on Twitter. JournalistTweets is powered by Cision’s Media Database, which could signal there will be a tighter integration between the Twitter directory and its commercial PR software in the future. This would make sense, since Cision did announce earlier this year that it would be including Twitter handles in its media database. Cision has also integrated search into its JournalistTweets, making it easy for you to search keywords across only journalists in the JournalistTweet database. This is the feature most PR professionals will probably be most excited

4) Another source for finding journalists and media professionals on Twitter is directories like Twellow and WeFollow.  The exhaustive Twitter directory created by Digg founder Kevin Rose called WeFollow which allows journalists to find other news professionals or even experts by hashtag. Tweeps are listed in order of the number of followers they have. To get added, users pick the three hashtags under which they want to be listed and then tweet the results to submit the listing. These directories list Twitter users across all kinds of categories, making it easy for you to search by keyword. For example, you can search “journalist” or “editor” or “election 2012″ to find Twitter users that have used those words in their profile. You can also browse by categories and narrow searches to refine your results. You will have to weed through the contacts.

5) You may also want to try the Journalists On Twitter Wetpaint wiki. This wiki has a lot of good contacts in it, though its creators stopped updating it a couple months ago (something about too many journalists on Twitter).

6) Below is what looks like the first attempts to annotate Journalists using a Wiki, MediaOnTwitter, from PRSarahEvans.com. While MediaOnTwitter is a good original comprehensive list.

7) On a PB Wiki called TwitteringJournalists on Twitter. I have pasted the named in below.
—————————————————————————————————————–
Source for this USA List

Abbie Lundberg, CIO, @abbielundberg
Adam Aston, Energy & Environment Editor, BusinessWeek, @adamnyc
Alfred Edmond, Jr., Sr. Editor-in-Chief, BlackEnterprise.com @alfrededmondjr
Allison Wenger, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @awenger
Amanda Emily, Web Developer, KXLY, @wageek
Amanda Murphy, Assignment Editor, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @amandamurphy
Amy Basista, Anchor/Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @AmyNBC4
Amy Feldman, Associate Editor, BusinessWeek, @amyfeldman
Ana Marie Cox, Time, @anamariecox
Andrea Cambern, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @Andrea10TV
Andrew Feinberg, FCC and Congressional Reporter, Telecommunications/Internet Policy, BroadbandCensus.com, @AGFHome
Andrew Mrozinski, Editor, Ridestory, Mesa, AZ @ridestory
Andrew Phelps, NPR, @andrewphelps
Andy Abramson, KenRadio’s World Technology RoundUp, http://twitter.com/andyabramson
Andy Hirsch, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Andy10TV
Andy Long, Videojournalist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @AndyL_WCMH
Angela An, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @AngelaAn10TV
Angie Goff, Traffic, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @angiegoff
Angie Hissong, Assignment Editor, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @angie235
Ann Handley, Chief Content Officer, MarketingProfs, @marketingprofs
Anna M. Gonzalez, Web Producer, CBS11TV.com/ TXA21TV.com , @GonzalezInTheAm
Anne Kornblut, Washington Post, @annekornblut
Ari Berman, The Nation, @ariberman
Arik Hesseldahl, Senior Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @ahess247
Asher Grey, radio reporter, @ashergrey
Avital Binshtock, freelance writer and editor (L.A. Times, Frommer’s, etc.), San Francisco, CA, @avitalb
Bailey Cultice, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @bcultice
Beau Bishop, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @BeauBishop
Ben Gelber, Meteorologist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @bgelber
Ben Levisohn, Staff Editor, Finance, BusinessWeek, @ben_levisohn
Ben Kuchera, Ars Technica, @benkuchera
Bob Ney, Congressional Commentator, Talk Radio News Service, @bobney
Bonnie King, Publisher, Salem News, Salem, OR @OregonNews
Brandon Bowers, Online Content Editor, Merced Sun-Star, @brandonbowers
Brandon Mendelson, Blogger, Albany Times Union @bjmendelson
Brian Stelter, NY Times, @brianstelter
Brittany Westbrook, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Brittany10TV
Burt Helm, Marketing Editor, BusinessWeek, @burthelm
Cathy von Hassel-Davies, Truthful Politics & Truthful Journalism, Saxapahaw, NC @catnc
Cara Connelly, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @Cara10TV
Carlos Gonzales, Weather, WBNS-10TV, @CarlosG10TV
Caroline McCarthy, CNET, @caro
Chad Livengood, Politics Reporter, Springfield (MO) News Leader, @ChadLivengood
Charles Cooper, CNET, @coopeydoop
Charles Dubow, Lifestyle Channel Editor, BusinessWeek.com, @charlesdubow
Cheryl Biren, Managing Editor, OpEdNews.com @cherylbiren
Chi-Chu Tschang, Bejing Correspondent, BusinessWeek, @tschang
Chris Booker, E.P. Special Projects, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @BookerNBC4
Chris Bradley, Weather, WBNS-10TV, @ChrisB10TV
Chris Cadelago, Blogger/Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle, @ccadelago
Chris Cuomo, News Anchor, Good Morning America, @ChrisCuomo
Chris Kromm, Editor/Publisher, Facing South Online and Southern Exposure Magazine, @chriskromm
Chris LaFortune, Pioneer Press, Oak Park, IL @cubreporter
Chris O’Brien, San Jose Mercury News business columnist, @sjcobrien
Christa M. Miller, Freelance B2B Writer, @christammiller
Chuck Olsen, Chief Correspondent, The UpTake, @Chuckumentary
Chuck Strickler, Anchor, WBNS-10TV @Chuck10TV
Clark Boyd, Technology Correspondent, BBC/WGBH Radio, @worldstechpod
Clint Ecker, Ars Technica, @clint
Connie Bennett, Freelance Health & Lifestyle Journalist, @conniebennett
Corinne Hess, Health Care Reporter, Milwaukee Business Journal, @CorriHess
Craig Friedman, 10TV.com, @Craig10TV
Crystal Dempsey, Contributing Editor, CLT Blog @crystaldempsey
Dan Farber, CNET, @dbfarber
Dan Frommer, Silicon Alley Insider, @fromedome
Dan Fronczak, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @DanF10TV
Dan Noyes, I-Team Investigative Reporter, KGO-TV, @dannoyes
Dan Patterson, ABC News, @danpatterson
Dan Tynan, Tynan on Technology, @Tynan_on_tech
Dana Franks, WAFF-TV, Huntsville, AL @ariedana
Dave Courvoisier, news anchor, KLAS-TV, @courVO
Dave Erickson, anchor/reporter, KXLY @SpokaneDave
David Berndt, psychologist blogger, author, AuthorFriendly.wordpress.com, @authorfriendly
David Brauer, MinnPost.com, MN @dbrauer
David Brody, Christian Broadcasting Network, @davidbrody
David Folkenflik, reporter, NPR @davidfolkenflik
David Louie, Technology Reporter ‘Moneyscope’, KGO-TV, @moneyscope
David Sleight, Art Director, BusinessWeek.com, @stuntbox
Dayna Roselli, Morning Anchor, KLAS-TV, @DaynaRoselli
Dean C. Smith, Breaking News Photographer/Editor/Live Van Op., KGO-TV, @deancsmith
Denise Scammon, Special Sections Editor, Sun Journal, Lewiston, ME, @specialdee
Denise Valdez, 4pm Anchor & Dishing & Dining Host, KLAS-TV, @denisevaldez
Denise Yost, Managing Editor, http://www.nbc4i.com, Columbus, OH @denise_WCMH
Dewayne Bevil, Theme Park Reporter, Orlando Sentinel, http://www.orlandosentinel.com, @DewayneB
Dom Tiberi, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @DomTiberi
Don Lafferty, Social Media Director, Wild River Review, @donlafferty
Don Van Natta Jr., Inestigative Reporter, New York Times, @DVNJr
Donn Lemon, CNN, @donnlemoncnn
Donna Willis, Web Content Coordinator, http://www.nbc4i.com, Columbus, OH @donna_nbc4i
Douglas MacMillan, Technology Writer, BusinessWeek.com, @dmac1
Dr. Debby Herbenick, Writer, Health, Time Out, @mysexprofessor
Edward Adams, Editor & Publisher, ABA Journal, @edadams
Edward Lawrence, Reporter, KLAS-TV, @edwardlawrence
Elinor Mills, CNET, @elinormills
Elizabeth Wilson, Associate Editor, Entrepreneur, @EditorLiz
Ellen Ratner, Bureau Chief, Talk Radio News Service, @ellenratner
Emily Sweeney, Staff Reporter, Boston Globe, @emilysweeney
Eric James Miller, Journalist, Living Las Vegas, @VegasVeniceDude
Eric Krangel, Silicon Alley Insider, @ekrangel
Erik Sherman, Contributing Editor, BNET & Chief Executive, freelance writer on business, technology, food and the arts, @eriksherman
Francesca DiMeglio, Community Manager, Business School, BusinessWeek.com, @francescaBW
Francine Hardaway, Fast Company, Huffington Post and Stealthmode blogs @hardaway
Frank Macek, Director/Producer, WKYC-TV, @fmacek
Garance Franke Ruta, Washington Post, @thegaranceFrontPage
Garrett M. Graff, editor, Washington Magazine, @vermontgmg
Geoff Williams, freelance writer, @geoffw
Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com, @glenngreenwald
Ginny Skal, WNCN NBC 17, Raleigh, NC, @ginnyskal
Heather Green, Associate Editor & Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @Heatherlgreen
Heidi Krupp-Lisiten, Freelance Writer, @kruppster
Helen Walters, Innovation & Design Editor, BusinessWeek.com, @helenwalters
Ian Everett, Editor, JambleMag.com, @jamblemag
Ivan Oransky, Managing Editor – Online, Scientific American, @sciam and @ivanoransky
Jacqui Cheng, assistant editor, Ars Technica, @ejacqui
Jake Tapper, ABC, @jaketapper
James Dowd, Business Reporter, The Commercial Appeal, @jamesdowd1
Jan Buchholz, Reporter, Phoenix Business Journal, @jreneebuchholz
Janet Justano, Reporter, KLAS-TV, @janetjustano
Jay Goodman Tamboli, Legal Affairs Correspondent, Talk Radio News Service, @jtamboli
Jason Chupick, PR Newser, @jasonchupick
Jason DeRusha, reporter, WCCO, Minneapolis, @DeRushaJ
Jason Mays, Assignment Editor, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @jason_WCMH
Jason Pontin, Editor in Chief and Publisher of Technology Review, @jason_pontin
Jeb Sharp, Reporter, PRI’s The World, @jebsharp
Jeff Elder, The Charlotte Observer, @JeffElder
Jeff Hogan, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @JeffHogan10TV
Jerod Smalley, Sports Anchor/Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @jsmalley
Jerry Revish, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @Jerry10TV
Jim Campbell, Executive Producer/E-I-C, Aero-News Network, @AeroNews
Jim Long, NBC, @newmediajim
Joe Spurr, Web Developer/Producer, KPBS (NPR affiliate), @joebird
John A. Byrne, Executive Editor and Editor-in-Chief of BusinessWeek.com, @johnabyrne
John Dickerson, Slate, @jdickerson
John Fortney, Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @JohnFortney
John Hassell, deputy managing editor, The Star-Ledger, @johnhassell
John Markoff, The New York Times, @markoff
Jon Fine, Media Columnist, BusinessWeek, @jonfine
Jon Swartz, Technology Reporter, USA Today, @jswartz652
Jonathan Tannenwald, Philadelphia Inquirer College Basketball writer/Soft Pretzel Logic blog, @jtannenwald
Judy Pokras, Freelance Food Writer, @sketchgrrl
Julia Catalfino, Executive Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @jcatalfino
Julia Kumari Drapkin, Environmental Reporter, BBC/WGBH Radio, @JuliaKumari
Julio Ojeda-Zapata, consumer-technology columnist, St. Paul Pioneer Press, @jojeda, @PiPress, @twitinbiz
Justin Ellis, Staff Writer, Portland Press Herald, @JustinNXT
Jym Ganahl, Meteorologist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @jganahl
Kara Swisher, The Wall Street Journal, @karaswisher
Karen Tumulty, Time Magazine, @ktumulty
Karina Nova, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @KarinaNova
Karl Brauer, Editor-in-Chief, Edmunds.com, @karlbrauer
Karl Pearson-Cater, Dir. of Operations, MinnPost.com, MN @bigboxcar
Katie Logan, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @10TVSports
Kayla G. Castille, WCNC-TV, @KaylaC
Keith O’Brien, Editor, PRWeek, @keithobrien
Ken Fisher, editor, Ars Technica, @kenfisher
Ken Smith, Helicopter Reporter, KLAS-TV, @helicopterken
Kevin Allison, Tech reporter, Financial Times, San Francisco, @kevinallisonft
Kim Martucci, Meteorologist, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @Kim_Martucci
Kit Seeyle, New York Times, @kseeyle
Kristen Orlando, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @kristenWCMH
Kurt Ludlow, Anchor, WBNS 10, Columbus, OH @kurtludlow10TV
Kyle Durban, 10TV.com, @Kyle10TV
Laura Hertzfeld, Producer, PBS, @Laura_PBS
Lauren Diedrich, Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @laurendiedrich
Lauren Fritsky, Contributing writer, AOL’s Lemondrop.com @LaurenFritsky
Lauren Young, Personal Finance Editor, BusinessWeek, @laurenyoung
Lesli Foster, Anchor, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @leslifoster
Linda Milazzo, Managing Editor, OpEdNews.com @LindaMilazzo
Lou Lavelle, Associate Editor, Business Schools, BusinessWeek, @louislavelle
Lovisa Frost, News Director, Talk Radio News Service, @lovisafrost
Lydia Dishman, freelance business journalist, food/wine/travel writer, blogger, @lydiabreakfast
Lynn Sweet, Chicago Sun Times, @lynnsweet
Maggie Reardon, CNET, @maggie_reardon
Marc Ambinder, Atlantic Monthly, @marcambinder
Mark Gibbs, Columnist, Network World, @quistuipater
Mark Milian, Tech Writer, LA Times, @mmilian
Marissa Brassfield, Editor, TrendHunter.com, @brassfield
Marshall V. King, Food columnist/multimedia editor, Elkhart Truth, Elkhart County, IN @hungrymarshall
Marshall McPeek, Meteorlogist, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @marshallmcpeek
Marty M. Fahncke, Electronic Retailer Magazine and freelancer @fawnkey
Mary Ellen Hardies, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @maryellennbc4
Maryn McKenna, magazine freelance, sci/med author, blogger, @marynmck, @MRSA_blog
Matt Cooper, Portfolio, @mattizcoop
Matt Vella, Staff Writer, Innovation & Design, BusinessWeek, @mattvella
Melissa Massello, Founder, Editor in Chief, Shoestring Magazine @shoestring
Michael Arrington, TechCrunch, @TechCrunch
Michael Finney, Consumer Reporter, KGO-TV, SanFrancisco, @mfinney
Michael Krigsman, Blogger, ZDNet, @mkrigsman
Michelle Gallardo, Reporter, ABC 7 Chicago, @mlgallardo
Michelle Lockett, Sr. User Participation Mgr., BusinessWeek, @michellelockett
Mikaela Hunt, Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @mhunt
Mike Allen, Politico, @mikeallen
Mike Davis, Weather, WBNS-10TV, @MikeDavis10TV
Mike Gonzalez, morning anchor/reporter, KXLY @kxlymike
Mikhail Lyubansky, Managing Editor, OpEdNews.com @mikhaill
Missy Gleason, Producer, WBNS-10TV, @Missynews
Nancy Rich, Media Director, SweptAwayTV.com, @SweptAwayTV
Nancy Shute, Contributing Editor, US News & World Report, @nancyshute
Nicole Denman, Producer, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @nicolenbc4
Olivier Knox, Agence France-Presse Congress/Political Correspondent, @OKnox
Omar Gallaga, Austin American-Statesman Tech lifestyles writer, @omarg
Patrick O’Brien, Digital Director, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @obrienmedia
Paul Aker, Reporter, WBNS-10TV, @10Investigates
Paul Robichaux, sr. contributing editor & blogger, Windows IT Pro, @paulrobichaux
Paul Schmelzer, managing editor, Minnesota Independent, @schmelzenfreude
Paul Spohn, Sports, WBNS-10TV, @PaulSpohn10TV
Paul Stelzer, Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @paul_stelzer
Paula Nelson, Special Sections Editor, Hernando Today, @flanewsgrrl
Peggy Fox, Moms Reporter, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @tvmom
Peter Carbonara, Senior Writer, Finance, BusinessWeek, @petercarbonara
Peter Coy, Economics Editor, BusinessWeek, @petercoy
Peter Mongillo, Austin American-Statesman Question Everything columnist, @pmongillo
Phil Baker, Tech columnist, San Diego Transcript, @pbaker
Phil Mintz, Business Schools Editor, BusinessWeek.com, @pmintz
Phil Schneid, Operations Manager, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @pschneid
Pia Christensen, Managing Editor/Online Services, Association of Health Care Journalists, @AHCJ_Pia
Rachel King, Technology Writer, BusinessWeek. @sfwriter
Rachel Kipp, Reporter, News-Journal, Wilmington, DE, @rkipp
Rachel Maddow, MSNBC, @maddow
Rachel Stassen-Berger, politics writer, St. Paul Pioneer Press: @PolAnimal, @MNvotes
Rachel Sterne, CEO, GroundReport, @RachelSterne
Rebecca McCormick, Travel Journalist and Photographer, WEHCO Media, @hotspringer
Reena Jana, Innovation Editor, BusinessWeek, @rjmac
Rich Copley, Lexington Herald Leader, Lexington, KY, Arts and Culture writer, @copiousnotes
Rick Dunham, Houston Chronicle, @rickdunham
Rick Rogala, General Manager, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @rickrogala
Rick Rothacker, Banking Reporter, Charlotte Observer, @rickrothacker
Rick Sanchez, News Anchor, CNN, @RickSanchez
Rob Hof, Silicon Valley Bureau Chief, BusinessWeek, @robhof
Rob Kall, Executive Editor, OpEdNews.com @RobKall
Rob Kunz, Newsroom, WBNS-10TV, @RobK10TV
Rob Tornoe, Political Cartoonist, Politicker.com, New York, NY @robtornoe
Roben Farzad, Senior Writer,BusinessWeek, @robenfarzad
Ron Casalotti, Dir. User Participation, BusinessWeek, @roncasalotti
Ron Fournier, AP, @rfournier
Ronnie Ramos, Sports Editor, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, @ajcsportseditor
Ronny Dory, Reporter, The Epoch Times, Washington, DC @rdory
Robyn Davis Sekula, freelance writer, business, profiles, home and garden, @robynds
Robyn Tomlin, executive editor (Wilmington, NC) Star-News, @robyntomlin
Ruth Ferguson, Editor, North Dallas Gazette, @NDGEditor
Ryan Paul, Ars Technica, @segphault
Ryan Squire, Managing Editor WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @nbcsquire
S. Dawn Casey, Pentagon Correspondent, Talk Radio News Service, @dawntrns
Sahar Aker, Founder, FatFighterTV.com, Columbus, OH @FatFighterTV
Sam Champion, Weather Anchor, Good Morning America, @SamChampion
Sara Walsh, Sports Reporter, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @SkinsUncensored
Sarah Lacy, Technology Columnist, BusinessWeek, @sarahcuda
Sarah Lindner, Austin American-Statesman Life Guide columnist, @sarahintx
Saul Hansell, The New York Times, @shansell
Sean Polay, Director of Internet Audience Development, Ottaway, @spolay
Sharon Chapman, Austin American-Statesman Entertainment editor, @slctexas
Sheigh Crabtree, Los Angeles Times, @sheigh
Shirley Brady, Community Editor, BusinessWeek.com, @shirleybrady
Spencer Ante, Technology Editor, BusinessWeek, @spencerante
Stephanie Wilson, Consumer Producer, WUSA-TV, Washington, DC @stephw8
Stephanie Zimmermann, Consumer Columnist, Chicago Sun-Times, @cst_thefixer
Stephen Baker, Senior Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @stevebaker
Stephen Shankland, CNET, @stshank
Steve Hamm, Senior Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @stevehamm31
Steve Tilley, Tech, Web and Video Game Writer, Sun Media, @stevetilley
Steve Wildstrom, Personal Technology Writer, BusinessWeek, @swildstrom
Susan Tran, Anchor/Reporter, WSOC-TV, @susantran
Suzanne Tobias, reporter and columnist, The Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kan.). @suzannetobias
Tacoma Newsome, Reporter, WCMH-TV, Columbus, OH @tnewsome
Tala Dowlatshahi, United Nations Correspondent, Talk Radio News Service, @tdowlats
Tannette Johnson-Elie, Business Columnist, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @telie
Theodora Blanchfield, Reporter, IP Law & Business, New York, NY @tblanchfield
Thomas Smith, Orlando, FL Local 6, @thomassmith
Todd Mundt, Louisville NPR affiliate, @toddmundt
Tom Foremski, San Francisco, SiliconValleyWatcher.com, @tomforemski
Tomio Geron, VentureWire, @tgsf
Toni Sciacqua, Managing Editor, The Daily Breeze, Torrance, CA, @dailybreezeME
Tracy Townsend,Anchor, WBNS-10TV, @TracyT10TV

26% of those 65 & older now use social networking sites

September 6, 2010 Comments off

Social networking use among internet users ages 50 and older has nearly doubled — from 22% to 42% over the past year.

 While social media use has grown dramatically across all age groups, older users have been especially enthusiastic over the past year about embracing new networking tools. Although email continues to be the primary way that older users maintain contact with friends, families and colleagues, many users now rely on social network platforms to help manage their daily communications — sharing links, photos, videos, news and status updates with a growing network of contacts.

Half (47%) of internet users ages 50-64 and one-in-four (26%) users ages 65 and older now use social networking sites.

 Half of online adults ages 50-64 and one-in-four wired seniors now count themselves among the Facebooking and LinkedIn masses. That’s up from just 25% of online adults ages 50-64 and 13% of those ages 65 and older who reported social networking use one year ago in a survey conducted in April 2009.

 Young adult internet users ages 18-29 continue to be the heaviest users of social networking sies like Facebook and LinkedIn, with 86% saying they use the sites. However, over the past year, their growth paled in comparison with the gains made by older users. Between April 2009 and May 2010, internet users ages 50-64 who said they use a social networking site like MySpace, Facebook or LinkedIn grew 88% and those ages 65 and older grew 100% in their adoption of the sites, compared with a growth rate of 13% for those ages 18-29.

 One-in-ten (11%) online adults ages 50-64 and one-in-twenty (5%) online adults ages 65 and older now say they use Twitter or another service to share updates about themselves or see updates about others.

 The use of Twitter and other services to share status updates has also grown among older users — most notably among those ages 50-64. While just 5% of users ages 50-64 had used Twitter or another status-update service in 2009, 11% now say they use these tools. On a typical day, 6% of online adults ages 50-64 make Twitter a part of their routine, up from the 1% who did so in 2009.

 By comparison, social networking sites have gained a much larger foothold in the lives of older Americans over time. One-in-five (20%) online adults ages 50-64 say they use social networking sites on a typical day, up from 10% one year ago. Likewise, 13% of online adults ages 65 and older log on to social networking sites, compared with just 4% who did so in 2009.

 Email and online news are still more appealing to older users, but social media sites attract many repeat visitors.

 While email may be falling out of favor with today’s teenagers, older adults still rely on it heavily as an essential tool for their daily communications. Overall, 92% of those ages 50-64 and 89% of those ages 65 and older send or read email and more than half of each group exchanges email messages on a typical day. Online news gathering also ranks highly in the daily media habits of older adults; 76% of internet users ages 50-64 get news online, and 42% do so on a typical day. Among internet users ages 65 and older, 62% look for news online and 34% do so on a typical day.

 Social media properties — including networking and status-update sites — are newer additions to the daily digital diet of older adults. Yet, the “stickiness” of the sites is notable. To look at the data another way, among the pool of adults ages 50 and older who use social networking sites, 44% used them on the day prior to their being contacted for our survey.

 The pool of Twitter and status update users ages 50 and older is too small to segment, but the behavior of this limited early adopter group does suggest a similar tendency towards regular use of the sites.

 By comparison, less than half of online banking users ages 50 and older visited the sites on a typical day and less than one-in-five older users of online classified sites reported use of the sites “yesterday.”

 Source: Mary Madden, Senior Research Specialist, Pew Internet & American Life Project
August 27, 2010

Continue reading the full report at pewinternet.org.

Government Agencies & Gov Persons on Twitter

August 8, 2010 9 comments

I posted a list of media, reporters and editors who are on Twitter.  Now, I am posting a list of Government persons and Government agencies on Twitter (& Government Blogs are next).  I imagine that such lists could be used to build a new sort of  media 2.0 list for any small business, media or  PR professional in one place.

As a result, I came across this fabulous list which may be useful to media, PR, communication and public affairs proffessionals and I am reposting it to increase its circulation. It is a fabulous source.  The list  includes people and agencies of the U.S. government, organized according to the executive branch, legislative branch, and related sections.

The original source page changes from time to time so to keep up with those changes Click for RSS updates

Other resources include:

  1. Congresspedia for detailed information on members of Congress.
  2. Congressional140 provides a dynamically updating tweetstream of all of the Congress members twitter updates. Follow @congress140.
  3. GovTwit has a web directory and a Twitter account @GovTwit that encompasses U.S. federal, state, and local as well as International accounts.
  4. TweetCongress has a web directory and Twitter account @TweetCongress for a listing of members. Anyone can add new names there, too.

Notes:

  1. Any people listed, other than members of Congress, do not necessarily represent their agencies.
  2. If any people or agencies are unofficial feeds, they are marked as such.
  3. If you notice anyone or anything missing, you are welcome to edit yourself; else please send a tweet to @ariherzog

Executive Branch (including Cabinet, departments, and agencies)


Legislative Branch: U.S. Senate

  1. Barbara Boxer (D-CA)
  2. Sam Brownback (R-KS) (unofficial)
  3. Tom Coburn (R-OK)
  4. Susan Collins (R-ME)
  5. John Cornyn (R-TX)
  6. James DeMint (R-SC)
  7. Chris Dodd (D-CT)
  8. Richard Durbin (D-IL) (unofficial)
  9. John Ensign (R-NV)
  10. Russ Feingold (D-WI)
  11. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (unofficial)
  12. Chuck Grassley (R-IA)
  13. Kay Hagan (D-NC)
  14. Orrin Hatch (R-UT)
  15. James Inhofe (R-OK)
  16. Mel Martinez (R-FL)
  17. John McCain (R-AZ), presidential candidate in 2008
  18. Claire McCaskill (D-MO)
  19. Robert Menendez (D-NJ)
  20. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) (unofficial)
  21. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)
  22. Ben Nelson (D-NE)
  23. Bill Nelson (D-FL)
  24. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), former NH Governor
  25. Arlen Specter (D-PA)
  26. John Thune (R-SD)
  27. Mark Udall (D-CO)
  28. Tom Udall (D-NM)
  29. David Vitter (R-LA)
  30. Mark Warner (D-VA)
  31. Roger Wicker (R-MS)
  32. Dick Lugar (R-IN)

Legislative Branch: House of Representatives

  1. Neil Abercrombie (D-HI)
  2. Steve Austria (R-OH)
  3. Michelle Bachmann (R-MN)
  4. Gresham Barrett (R-SC)
  5. John Barrow (D-GA)
  6. Joe Barton (R-TX)
  7. Bob Beauprez (R-CO)
  8. Judy Biggert (R-IL)
  9. Gus Bilirakis (R-FL)
  10. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)
  11. Roy Blunt (R-MO), Minority Whip
  12. John Boehner (R-OH), Minority Leader; also runs GOP Leader
  13. John Boozman (R-AR)
  14. Leonard Boswell (D-IA)
  15. Kevin Brady (R-TX)
  16. Paul Broun (R-GA)
  17. Vern Buchanan (R-FL)
  18. Michael Burgess (R-TX)
  19. Dan Burton (R-IN)
  20. Eric Cantor (R-VA)
  21. Judge John Carter (R-TX)
  22. Mike Castle (R-DE)
  23. Jason Chaffetz (R-UT)
  24. Mike Coffman (R-CO)
  25. Ander Crenshaw (R-FL)
  26. John Culberson (R-TX)
  27. Artur Davis (D-AL)
  28. Keith Ellison (D-MN)
  29. Mary Fallin (R-OK)
  30. Jeff Flake (R-AZ)
  31. John Fleming (R-LA)
  32. Randy Forbes (R-VA)
  33. Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE)
  34. Virginia Foxx (R-NC)
  35. Trent Frakes (R-AZ)
  36. Marcia Fudge (D-OH)
  37. Phil Gingrey (R-GA)
  38. Gregg Harper (R-MS)
  39. Dean Heller (R-NV)
  40. Pete Hoekstra (R-MI)
  41. Mike Honda (D-CA)
  42. Duncan Hunter (R-CA)
  43. Bob Inglis (R-SC)
  44. Steve Israel (D-NY)
  45. Darrell Issa (R-CA)
  46. Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-IL)
  47. Lynn Jenkins (R-KS)
  48. Hank Johnson (D-GA)
  49. Jim Jordan (R-OH)
  50. Mary Jo Kilroy (D-OH)
  51. Mark Kirk (R-IL)
  52. Randy Kuhl (R-NY)
  53. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), presidential candidate in 2008
  54. Tom Latham (R-IA)
  55. Robert Latta (R-OH)
  56. Chris Lee (R-NY) (unofficial?)
  57. Sandy Levin (D-MI)
  58. Cynthia Loomis (R-WY)
  59. Ben Lujan (D-NM)
  60. Mary Bono Mack (R-CA)
  61. Dan Manzullo (R-IL)
  62. Ken Marchant (R-TX)
  63. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA)
  64. Thaddeus McCotter (R-MI)
  65. Buck McKeon (R-CA)
  66. Cathy McMorris-Rodgers (R-WA)
  67. Kendrick Meek (D-FL)
  68. Gregory Meeks (D-NY)
  69. Mike Michaud (D-ME)
  70. Candice Miller (R-MI)
  71. George Miller (D-CA), also runs Educ & Labor Democrats
  72. Harry Mitchell (D-AZ)
  73. Gwen Moore (D-WI)
  74. Glenn Nye (D-VA)
  75. Jim Oberstar (D-MN)
  76. Pete Olson (R-TX)
  77. Frank Pallone (D-NJ)
  78. Erik Paulsen (R-MN)
  79. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), Speaker of the House (unofficial)
  80. Mike Pence (R-IN)
  81. Ed Perlmutter (D-CO)
  82. Tom Perriello (D-VA)
  83. Chellie Pingrie (D-ME)
  84. Jared Polis (D-CO)
  85. Tom Price (R-GA)
  86. George Radanovich (R-CA)
  87. Charles Rangel (D-NY)
  88. Dennis Rehberg (R-MT)
  89. Dave Reichert (R-WA)
  90. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA)
  91. Tom Rooney (R-FL)
  92. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL)
  93. Peter Roskam (R-IL)
  94. Paul Ryan (R-WI)
  95. Tim Ryan (D-OH)
  96. Aaron Schock (R-IL)
  97. Kurt Schrader (D-OR)
  98. Joe Sestak (D-PA)
  99. Christopher Shays (R-CT)
  100. John Shimkus (R-IL)
  101. Bill Shuster (R-PA)
  102. John Sullivan (R-OK)
  103. Lee Terry (R-NE)
  104. Glenn Thompson (R-PA
  105. Zach Wamp (R-TN)
  106. Joe Wilson (R-SC)
  107. Rob Wittman (R-VA)
  108. John Yarmuth (D-KY)

Former U.S. Legislators

Video SEO Tips: Strategically Boost Your Search Engine Ranking

January 11, 2010 17 comments

Even with my recent posts on the social media landscape, said landscape continues to morph at warp speed, and we are seeing more and more videos everywhere; on business sites, corporate news pages, personal websites, video hosting sites, mobile devices, social networks, blogs, cell phones, email and postings to video portals, and posting for clients.  The Government even has its very own video channel on YouTube.   

I had to post a video very recently and immediately realized there needed to be a strategy for this MarCom element as well to maximize my external outreach efforts.  So, I went on a little “virtual research trip.” 

According to eMarketer, 63% of Americans currently watch online video, up from 32% in 2007. I am sure this number is much is higher now.  Three years hence, is a life time in the social media world.

My focus is always to look at how the changing landscape can benefit communication and marketing professionals with new media strategies and tools.  To do more with less and to do it cost effectively. Therefore, I am constantly scanning the social media landscape. 

Because many users do not have unlimited web space, either as a paid service, or through an ISP offering, video hosting services are becoming increasingly popular, especially with the explosion in popularity of blogs, forums, and other social media interactive pages.

When posting a video from a business,  public relations, marketing and communication perspective it is imperative to understand how to leverage your social presence through online videos by applying Video Search Engine Optimization (VSEO) strategies. 

 You do not want to be the needle in the hay stack that nobody ever finds. You want your target audiences to find you!  With the rise of  our current “Moblution” and Internet hosted Video services, your goal is to ultimately rise to the very top in the top search engines and their respective ranking results.  Clearly, Google is giving preferential treatment to multimedia content in search results, and this is an important factor to know!  I can’t quantify this just yet, but it’s a personal haunch, which I will try to validate with a little more research (so stay tuned & I will update this blog).  But it is my personal opinion that online video is the fastest way to achieve top organic search listings.

Secondly, YouTube alone has more than 52,436,820 unique visitors a day and ranked as the third top Internet site in the US.          But it is also important to know that there are more than 30 other video notable video hosting sites.  And there are indeed many more!

I guestimate that what you/we/I want to accomplish is channel saturation and depth of penetration through syndication across as many video hosting sites as possible.  So, the question begs, how does one syndicate their videos out across various video sharing websites? And, how does one carry out VSEO? 

The end goal is to have your video “optimized” to appear highly ranked in Google’s search results.  Video Syndication Brings Higher Rankings and More Targeted Traffic. Therefore, the idea is to syndicate your video by sending it out across multiple video sharing websites simultaneously to obtain maximum exposure  using specific strategic key words for search term results.   Below are a few useful tips. There may be more, but this will get you started an out of the hay stack, so to speak.

Strategic VSEO Tips:     

  • Place online video presentations on public sites and intranet portals
  • Remotely update videos on video portal websites
  • Enable viral video sharing
  • Integrate comment & rating capabilities
  • Allow for approval-based or automatic requests for video distribution
  • Capture statistics on syndication, viewership, Search Engine Ranking, redistribution performance

 VSEO TIPS:  

  1. Create Relevant, Unique, Informative Videos that speak to your target audiences 
  2. Consider Your Video thumbnails – A video thumbnail is what users see first when they make their decision as to whether or not to view your video or another. Video search engines and video sharing websites use different methods to grab and show the thumbnail for your video. Some engines use the first frame of the video while others, like YouTube, will often take the thumbnail from the exact middle of your video.
  3. Make Your Videos Less Than 5 min. Long – One of the worst things that you can do is to create a long-form video as most users watch videos 3 minutes or less. If you do have a video that is longer than 5 minutes in length, try to break it up into smaller videos and make sure to tag those accordingly.
  4. Sitemaps – For video that is hosted on your own website use of a video site map on your site will help to filter page rank as well as direct search engines where to index your content. Use relevant keywords within the anchor text of all links to the videos that are featured in your video sitemap.
  5. Surrounding HTML -In order to get your video to rank well, you clearly will need to provide the search engines with text based content that is relevant for them to index and rank you for. Ssurround your video content with relevant content (on-page) as well as related links.  Add a text transcript or external captions as text that you publish on the page with the video.
  6. Descriptive Meta Data – Use relevant keywords in your meta data to optimize your video.   Include a keyword rich description of the video within the meta descriptions.
  7. Title - Make sure that you use the relevant keywords in your title as this is likely the first thing that the search engines will use to identify your video. Also try using a catchy or unique title that will not only give attention to your video but convey your theme, product, or brand.
  8. Tags – tag your videos with key phrases that are reflective of the content.
  9. Keyword “video” - Eric Papczun pointed out at the Search Engine Strategies conference in NY this past April, that a lot of people add the word “video” to their search query keyword phrase. As a result, make sure that you add the word “video” to your title, description, meta data, etc.
  10. Optimize your video for Important Key Phrases – You might want to optimize your video for terms users are likely to be searching for. Tag your video with these terms, consider naming the file name of the video with these terms in mind.
  11. Optimize URLs - In the same way that you do this for other web pages, you will want to optimize your URLs so that they to contain information about the video. Also, make sure you only have one video per URL.
  12. Branding – Many of us have found that video marketing is a great tool to help generate brand awareness with your potential customers. Use a watermark throughout your video to help incorporate your brand.  This will help to drive users back to your main site if the video is hosted elsewhere.
  13. Inbound Linking – Link to videos using important keywords in anchor text.
  14. Upload to Video Sharing. Simultaniously upload to video portals (tubemogul & here as a paid service called Hey!Spread) and provide links back to related content and other videos on your Internet site. Here is a list of ways to get your Videos On Video Search & Sharing Sites
  • Miro – Miro converts any media RSS feed into a channel.
  • Video Upload Pro – Software to submit your videos to multiple video sites including Atom Films, Blip.tv, BoFunk, Bolt, ClipShack, EvideoShare, Flurl, Google Video, Guba, Jumpcut, Live Video, Myspace Video, PutFile, Veoh, Vimeo, Yahoo Video, Youtube, and more.
  • HeySpread – Free online tool to send videos to multiple sites
  • TubeMogul  TubeMogul is the hands down the best free tool to submit videos to multiple video sharing sites in one go. Currently supporting Metacafe, MySpace, Yahoo, Revver, AOL Video, DailyMotion, Blip, and BrightCove, TubeMogul does a great job at syndicating your videos out to these video sharing sites with full support for Titles, Tags, and Descriptions and provides analytics for you to track your video views across all of these websites. I highly recommend this free tool.   More about TubeMogel: TubeMogul’s free beta service has been live since November of 2006, and in January 2008, TubeMogul announced the launch of its Premium Products, which include a host of new professional features.  Through its acquisition of Illumenix in October 2008, TubeMogul is also able to offer rich engagement and performance metrics to video sharing sites, content creators and advertisers.  Brett Wilson, Co-founder and CEO, Brett leads the strategic direction for TubeMogul. He spent the first three years of his career as a consultant for Accenture. Next, he founded and led YouCanSave.com, a profitable e-commerce company that obtained over $69 million in revenue and was successfully acquired.

16. Allow Embed Code – Definitely enable sharing and allow users to embed your video code into their own blogs and websites. This will help to create backlinks to your video which can help increase the video search optimization as well as make your video go viral.

17. Encourage Ratings and Reviews - When you encourage users to rate your video, search engines will pay attention to videos that have higher ratings. In addition, videos which get high ratings from users tend to be the same videos that users often mark as favorites and share with other users.

18.  Submit each video sharing site destination URL to Onlywire for social bookmarking

19. Check for your video across listings within specific video search engines and video search sites.

20. Syndicate – Submit your video RSS or MRSS.  Here is a list of where to submit to Video RSS and MRSS Feeds

OTHER NOTES:

The Future: Mobile Video Hosting

A more recent application of the video hosting services is in the mobile web 2.0 arena, where video and other mobile content can be delivered to, and easily accessed by mobile devices. While Internet based video-hosting services such as YouTube ( and many others) have developed means by which video can be watched on mobile devices, mobile-oriented video hosting services is an evolving component of the new Mobilution to come, in rapid succession. So, if I had a crystal ball, I would suggest learning all I could about VSEO strategies inside and out, and then strategize how your futre video productions/hosting and distribution will fit into Mobile Video for Mobile Devices (MVMD) will be developed, deployed and optimized for VSEO…because…..

the future is not for the Internet viewership but with Mobile Devices, where we will be decoupled from the desktop.  A mobile live streaming software called Qik allows the users to upload videos from their cell phones to the internet. Currently videos are stored online and can be shared to various social networking sites like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube and others.  Videos will be stored on the servers and can be watched from both the mobile devices and the website.

I suggest that the future is in the mobile device.  Start strategizing now and begin formating your videos to meet those screen/size/distribution requirements. 

Also, a final note, please dont forget to continuoulsy build upon some of what I have previously posted in my other blog topics. For example, create a Bit.ly link of your video and submit it through Ping.fm and track it through both Bit.ly and strategically distribute through the Twitter Universe as well. Then send your bit.ly linked video through Mobile Marketing Services for distribution via cell phones.

Stay Tuned, as I will next talk about strategically Revamping Your Business Internet Press Rooms and Press Releases!  All the previous posts build upon the Changing Media Landscape, Social Media Landscape and Ultimately Web 2.0 enabling and maximizing your communication and marketing efforts into a creshendo of internal and external reciprocity with continuous communcations, or Now PR.

My Popularity (by popuri.us)

Letterman Tweets! What’s Your Twitter Strategy?

December 9, 2009 6 comments

Admittedly, even as David Letterman began his very first Tweets live on TV (snicker), there appears to be a great deal of nonsense communications, noise and ad hoc chatter.  He says, “it’s pointless and infantile.” But Dave, remember this medium is a relatively “new medium” and just beginning to blossom into maturity.  You can, indeed talk to David Letterman about whether  “You Smell Veal And Peppers?” 

But, seriously what is your Twitter strategy? Does your organization, agency, firm have a Twitter strategy?

With more than 70 Million users on Twitter, it is definitely the “buzz” word of 2009.  Twitter is a privately funded startup with offices in the SoMA neighborhood of San Francisco, CA.  Started as a side project in March of 2006, Twitter has grown into a real-time short messaging micro-blogging service that works over multiple networks and devices. Truly, mobilizing communications into“now” PR.

Indeed, Twitter appears to be THE sensational social network micro-blogging tool for entrepreneurs, job seekers, and companies. Twitter is being used as a research resource, a collaborative enterprise social medium, PR, communications and marketing tool, an audience measurement source, messaging utility, networking facilitator and broadcast system. In countries all around the world, people follow the sources most relevant to them and access information via Twitter as it happens right now—from breaking world news to updates from friends.

There are plenty of ad hoc strategies for approaching how to make effective use of Twitter.  And, for some, it may seem like it’s getting more complex each day.  Here are some Twitter stats

Is your Twitter strategy via one person posting aimlessly with many Tweets all day? Or, are you posting only as reactive Tweets to others? Does your organization have many people with Twitter accounts post about each internal line of business? Are you considering many single Twitter accounts? Are you considering Twitter accounts by topic, for many topics? Or, is your approach really more seat of the pants’?

The majority of practitioners … still prefer to ‘fly by the seat of their pants’ and use intuition rather than intellectual procedures to solve public relations problems.”  ~Managing Public Relations (1984), James Grunig and Todd Hunt

With the excitement over all the new capabilities, social media and near real-time communication. Initially, it may appear that your Twitter engagement success will need only three elements; enabling technologies, core applications and a shift in behavior.

You may hear or be part of….“We’ve got to get on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. And, as part of that immediacy, you may also hear that there is sense of urgency. Ok, so you signed up and have an account or multiple accounts. Once completed, you begin hearing water-cooler discussions, hallway whispers and planning sessions with may contain some of the following: Initially, to many people, Twitter may not make a lot of sense at first. How in the world can sending little 140 character messages to a bunch of people, many of whom you’ve never met, help us grow our business, build our brand or be effective outreach? What do we do now? How do we do this? Who’s going to do it? Who will maintain it? How many tweets can I/you/we/they manage? How many should we send out daily, hourly, weekly? Why are we doing this? How many topics can we/you/they manage? How many responses can you/they RT in response hourly, daily, weekly, monthly? Who should we RT on? What if we end up with 2,000, 4,000 or 10,000 followers in under a month? Are we strategically ready to respond to each and every single follower? Do we send canned micro-conversations? What if you/we get no followers? How will we handle disgruntled audiences? What if you/we only get “women” followers who spam our account with messages wanting/sending messages to follow you to their “picts” or other services? How will you handle this if it these as ReTweets to some of our topics? What if staff want to take part as individuals? Again, Why are we doing this? Do we need to tell everyone internally?

In, a nut shell, avoid trying to fit two or three divergent strategies into one Twitter account as a melting pot.

Some of old school PR methods may still be of significant value for our evolving new communication world. Case in point, the Edward Bernays paradigm outlined in his influential 1920s book, Crystallising Public Opinion and expanded in his classic 1955 PR text, The Engineering of Consent, on which most modern public relations thinking is based, is under challenge from new approaches which if continued without adequate research will speed up “PR’s descent into disrepute.”

As a result, I plead for the continued need for the “Engineering of PR as a result of well founded research upon which one should base their basic Twitter strategy.

Therefore, to answer the Twitter strategy question in part, I emphatically assert that your strategy should not be ad hoc, should not be many different things crammed into one channel, but based on a sound strategic MarCom 101 basic formula, wherein Marston provided the R.A.C.E. formula for public relations which identified four stages. (research, action, communication and evaluation). Cutlip and Center provided their own formula based on this which they expressed as fact-finding, planning, communication and evaluation. For the purpose of this discussion, we will only focus on the emphasis of doing your research first.  Research is more than just a one-off activity at the end of campaigns and programs, but an ever on-going integral process of communications.

Evaluate inputs, outputs and outcomes as part of a continuous, integrated communication process (R.A.C.E.) from the earliest stages of planning, then if need be…hourly, daily, weekly, monthly. Use a range of formal and informal communication research methods which will lead to your final evaluation being strategic and much more valuable to management when aligned with mission and objectives.

For a variety of specific high level Twitter strategies consider some of the following:

  • Corporate Reputation Management
  • Event Coverage
  • Media Relations
  • Advocacy
  • Product, Service, Promotion, Sales
  • Internal Communication
  • Investor Relations
  • Customer Relations
  • Crisis Management

 With any of these strategies, you will then need to use three key steps for each: follow, create and engage.

Twitter Strategy Considerations: Do Your Research First.

Research & Identify: How do you want to use Twitter? What function will it serve in meeting your objectives, target audience, needs and goals?

Research and know who your target audience, competitors and stakeholders are and what they are saying on Twitter: There are more than 50 research, tracking and analytic tools available to help track your audience, trends, messaging and your performance on Twitter. Learn a bit more about the basics of Twitter Search here. Here are a few named directly, Twazzup, Twitteranalyzer, Tweettronics,Twittercounter, Tweettronics,Twitnest, Klout, SuiteSpot, SuiteSpot,Monitter Wefollow, Twittermap.tv, Twittermap.us.

Research Who to Strategically Follow: Avoid following hundreds of people or companies immediately as this tactic gives the impression you are spamming people with sales propaganda. Consider developing strategic partnership followers/stakeholder to help leverage your outreach efforts, working in concert with other top industry SME’s. Therefore Research Who to follow, and identify people and agencies in the industry, business, niche, or company inline with your overall goals and objectives. Perform your due diligence before following someone. Do not sign up for an auto-follow service

Research Keywords: Make a list of relevant and timely keywords to help you find the conversations you want to follow and Tweet about. See what others are doing/using. Consider comparing these Key words what you are already using on your Internet sites, cloud tags, meta tags, search engine SEO Strategically synch them all.

Research: Integrate Search/SEO/SEM: Input in your keywords, names, topics into the internal/external search engines to tap into the conversations you wish to follow and engage in.

Develop & Vary Your Strategic Messaging: For example, for every 15 “Tweets” you may want to write or respond to 10 external value based tweets and then post 5 are about your products, services, or events. Create your editorial “calendar” for a daily, weekly basis. But also beware who is Tweeting about your topics as well, as misinformation. You can research this with a variety of tools as well. Within your 7 value messages leave links to your resources, services, products

Strategically Plan to Use Tiny Urls: Use these valuable links to shrink the size of your URL links so they fit within Twitter’s 140 character limit. Since the launch of Tinyurl.com about 100 or similar sorts of URL shorteners have developed. As of Spring 2009, Bit.ly over took Tinyurl’s use on Twitter.

Strategically Plan to RT. “RT” stands for Re-Tweet. This is a form of recognition and the best strategy for networking. When you want to recognize someone’s Tweet content you simply place RT and then copy their Tweet. This provides your network with the valuable information and opens up a line of communication with that person, organization or topic of discussion. Consider this may require more real time communication planning scenarios. How will you handle this? @: This is another form of recognition. If you @person or company you can ask them a question as well as publicly recognize them for their writing, topic or discussion. This is engaging with your audience.

Research and Strategically Plan for Your #FollowFriday: (Consider Target Audience, Other Twitters, Other Lists, Other Topics, Other SMEs, Trending Up) Twitter Strategies: #Followfriday Recommendations: during your #Followfriday efforts use a combination of messages. Write a few #followfriday messages, then create a Mr.Tweet recommendation. Make sure you check the auto tweet option on your Mr.Tweet recommendation, so it shows up in your tweet stream. Mr. Tweet, the self proclaimed “Your Personal Networking Assistant”, recommendations. Much like the strategy behind Linkedin recommendations, Mr Tweet recommendations allow Twitterers the opportunity to strategically recommend their favorite Twitterers. The Twitter strategy in making use of favorites can be used in conjunction with your Mr.Tweet Twitter strategy. Mr.Tweet Recommendations: There are two methods to writing a recommendation on Mr. Tweet. You can use the Mr. Tweet internal search engine to find people you want to recommend or you can allow Mr.Tweet to suggest people you may wish to recommend.

Keep your ear to the ground continuously monitoring and evaluating the pulse. And, as Dave Letterman said, “someone go outside and see if the followers coming!”

Be sure to have fun!

Other Resources:

  • A Twitter Guide:
  • A UK Gov Twitter Policy
  • Tweetdeck, Organize followers into specific categories (i.e. industry leaders, customers, etc.)
  • A List of Social Marketing Examples: Thanks to Peter Kim
  • Offshoot: Examples of Social Marketing by Channel Type: Ray Schiel’s Blog
  • An External Wacovia Brand Twitter Case Study

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New to Micro Blogging? Try 12 Other Tools

December 4, 2009 1 comment

The mutation of communication is drilled down to about 140 characters, these days. Micro-blogging is all the rage, and it has the potential to become a new informal communication medium especially for collaborative work.  Over the last few years communication patterns have shifted primarily from face-to-face communication to more online communication in E-mail, IM and other tools. But, for organizations, I personally consider micro blogging, from a business perspective,  to be the new media/press distribution channel. But, shhhh, don’t tell anyone. It will be just our little secret. 

Don’t understand what all the Twitter mania is about or why you might even want to consider using this social networking tool? You’re not alone, but you might be missing out on useful information and professional connections.  Read more about other micro blogging tools and options out there for consideration which are not Twitter.  It’s important to always have more than one choice, I think.  Try a few out, test their functionality against Twitter. Provide your opinion on which you like best? What do you like least, and why.

Have a good weekend everyone!  I am just a little giddy about our pending first skiff of “snow” for the season here in the DC Metro area.  I am watching for the very first flake or two to materialize, any time now, while silently humming to…..”Chesnuts roasting on an open Fire.” 

——————————————————————————————————————————————–

Reprinted/Reposted from CIO.

12 Microblogging Tools to Consider

Looking for business-friendly alternatives to Twitter? Check out these options.

Tue, December 01, 2009 — CIOIf you’re thinking about implementing a microblogging effort for your workplace, here are 12 tools to consider. (For more on the microblogging trend and why more businesses are hopping aboard, see our related story: “Twitter Alternatives That Are All Business”.

1. Co-op: Allows you to post updates, ask questions, share links and track time. This tool also offers the ability to share your daily agenda with coworkers and enables you to search the transcript for old information. Tool is free.
2. Cyn.in: Combines collaboration tools such as wikis, social networks, blogs, file sharing repositories, microblogs and discussion boards into a secure enterprise platform. Free and paid accounts available.

Click here to find out more!
3. Jaiku: Similar to Twitter but supported by Google. Updates can be posted via Web, instant message and SMS, as well as through third-party applications built by other developers. Tool is free.
4. Obayoo: Allows you to create a private and secure network for your company. Features include archiving messages, creating groups and inviting people related to your work, perhapsclients and contractors, to participate in discussions. Tool is free.
5. Present.ly: Features include creating groups for each project or topic of discussion; sharing documents, video and audio clips. Can be accessed via computer or mobile phone. Tool is free.
6. Sharetronix: Open-source software that allows updates of 160 characters or less. Features include bookmarking favorite posts, sending users direct messages and adding up to 10 tags to describe the user’s interests, hobbies, profession, etc. Tool is free.
7. Snipia: Capabilities include creating project groups, assigning and updating tasks to group members, posting Twitter-like status updates, and uploading and sharing files with your team members. Tool is free.
8. Socialcast: Features include public and private groups, e-mail integration, custom filters, user profiles and analytics that provide insight into the people, connections and information sharing occurring in your Socialcast community. Free and paid accounts available.
9. Socialtext: Accessible via browser, mobile device or an Adobe AIR desktop application. Features include a wiki, social networking profiles and activity streams. Free for up to 50 members.
10. StatusNet: Enables incorporation of micromessaging into a business’s own Web domain. Features include file sharing, groups, plug-ins and apps, customizable themes, and desktop and mobile access. Support costs extra.
11. WorkSimple: Offers users a personalized dashboard that displays upcoming commitments, tracks deliverables and highlights assignments; social profiles that showcase skills and peer recommendations; and performance profiles that capture employee performance, accomplishments and reviews. Free and paid accounts available.

12. Yammer: Private and secure. Incorporates microblogging, a company social network, discussion board, search capability, groups and can be accessed via desktop, mobile phone, instant messaging, e-mail or SMS. Free and paid accounts available.

Integration in a Fragmented Media World

October 12, 2009 3 comments

Like many, we all have our profiles set up in more than a few social networking sites. It could become a time consuming and complex task to keep up and in touch with all your friends and contacts from all these different networks. In my last post, I hinted at how fragmented communications has become. There are now tools that allow you to either post or connect across all the popular networks – Facebook, LinkedIn, Plaxo, GovLoop, Flickr, Friendster, Twitter, AIM, MSN Messenger and Yahoo! Messenger,  just to name a few.

Are you a media, marketing, social marketing, public affairs or communications strategist looking for ways to streamline your external communications outreach and increase the depth of your Internet penetration? You can accomplish a more mature communications model that mirrors near “continuous communications”  out to your target audiences.  And, you can do it across multiple online media channels. There are a few ways in which you can carry out this multi-tasking function.

You can either do it one by one with each individual channel with a single cut and peck-peck-peck method (no please don’t do that)  or you can do it simultaneously across all of your media channels posting from anywhere to everywhere.  

So, tonight, I want to mention a few tools which I personally like using, from an external communications perspective.   These do not require any IT investment except your time in learning how to use them. Really, it’s quiet simple.  They all are free.  Yep, no cost. Nada. I am sure there are similar tools out there and others are sprouting up through the Internet perma-frost even as I am typing this up (copycats, are a nice complement in adding to an already good thing).

I also personally believe these tools can help with more consistency in an organizations external messaging and driving increased awareness in a tough and highly competitive economy. 

The first tool I mention is for pushing/micro-blogging your messages out simultaneously. The second is for shortening your URL links (and making them trackable)  to save space  pointing people where you want to drive your target audience in a 140 character world. And, finally, the third  tool is for generally zooming down to a geographic area and “listening” to the buzz on the street, real-time. Remember, we have to listen to know what to say in order to resonate with our target audiences ( this is just one tool).

1) Ping.fm. Often it’s the (seemingly) simple applications that turn out to be the most powerful, and the most popular. Simplicity is beautiful.  Ping.fm is a service that allows you to easily update a host of social networking and social media profiles all at once, seeks to resolve the headache of needing to log into multiple accounts to send the same message to different groups of friends and contacts all over the Internet. Ping.fm also has a decent help Wiki for more information. 

Additionally, I like the fact that I can Ping right from my browser toolbar so simply that it makes my just giddy.  While for some, Ping.fm may just be a nice little time-saving utility, for social media and communication professionals, this service may well be THE killer app of our time.   Over the last few years communication patterns have shifted primarily from face-to-face communication to more online communication in email, IM, and other tools.    As more collaboration is being done remotely through technology, there are relatively fewer opportunities for face to face informal conversations. In addition to time constraints or human resource limitations at work due to employee downsizing, drilled down efficiencies can be useful.    To learn a bit more about Ping.fm read what’s on Wikipedia for some general information.

2) I am sure many of you have heard of or used Tinyurl.com. I believe it has the longest shelf life and was the first, dating back to about 2001/2002.  URL shortening is a technique where an individual can  make a web page available under a very short URL  in addition to the original address.   Since the launch of Tinyurl.com about 100 or similar sorts of URL shorteners have been born.  As of Spring 2009, Bit.ly over took Tinyurl’s usage on Twitter.   So I think it is safe to say, it has leading edge staying power.  I personally like Bit.ly because it also allows me to quasi track the results of  my link click through rates in real-time. It has some other good features as well. I came across an article that talks about some of the others, of course each one has its pros anc cons.  For example, tr.im is another one which uses your Twitter account as your login, making it a sure-fire hit if it keeps up the rest of its services as well.  A great one to try, it might surprise you.  And then you have U.nu which creates the smallest URLs of any shortener, with only about 8 characters for each new URL  created(not including the “http://”).  That’s mighty tiny.  The point is, that you have some choices with regards to shortening your long Webpage URLs for all your external communications so you can drive people exactly where you want them to go with a compelling message and then track that link’s click results.   Anyone still hand typing paper press releases anymore and faxing them?  Really, you can do it all with in the blink or wink of an eye, well almost. Now, that’s affordable and near continuous communications.

3)  Visual Trends Map on Twitter topics being discussed or micro-blogged about in real-time. You really can get a pulse of what’s hot and what’s being talked about in specific geographic areas. Just incredible. And, then you can formulate and message and respond using the tools mentioned.

If one thing communications has taught me is that it is a constantly evolving medium. Never static, either in the evolution of the language we use or the medium in which we communicate through.  We started with fire and smoke signals, sticks drawing in the dirt, painting on cave walls, pen and ink, the Gutenberg Press, newspapers,  the telegraph, the LinoType, telephone, Radio, TV, Internet, Cellphones and so on to name just a few media landmarks (not necessarily in exact chrono order). 

Johannes Gutenberg, the inventor of movable type in 1452, was deemed “the most influential man of the millennium.” The first book printed in the colonies was in 1640. The first publisher was Lipincott.   And, Thomas Jefferson was a radical for his defense of Free Speech.  That old press release written in AP style? And, Ivy Lee, a PR genius.  It was created to fit into the evolution of communication by using a new tool with the advent of electronic transmissions across telegraph wires, dating back to the early 1900′s.  And, YES indeedy here we are in 2009  and we are still formatting our press releases the very same way we did 103 years ago.  Why?  Much has changed. Some things have not.

Your organization’s lead news ‘graph of 21 words or less in a 350 word press release should be considered a historical dinosaur (forgive me, being a PR professional, I should know better than to even whisper such).   It begs a few content related communication and distribution upgrades.  No, an extreme makeover.

Is that press release formatted for continuous instant consumption to fit in a 140 character Tweet?  Is it formatted for today’s “telegraph wire” in 2009? And, is that press release just sitting on your Website with a hyperlink to it sitting there percolating on your server going no where, with scads and scads of other press releases from years and years and years  ago?

There are, of course, still some resonating repeating themes from the original press release objective.  And, I encourage you to read the article to see if you can pick out a few?  I will wait, go check that link right there just above this line.

Open, transparent communication?  Hmmmm.   As this post draws to a close highlighting three useful online tools,  it leads me to yet another area for exploration.  Web 2.o enabled social media press rooms and social media press releases, can they still accomplish the Who, What, When, Where and Why in an inverted pyramid format?    Should we?   We we are to achieve open and transparent communications, we may well need to recraft out media relations is formatted, tactically accomplished and transmitted.  

Stay tuned for more.  Are you ready? Are your Website media “rooms” Web 2.0 enabled? Are  your press releases Web 2.0 enabled?

Have we come full circle?  Are we not still saying and wanting the very same things today that were echoed in 1906?  

What is your idea of the best Social Media Press Release for a main stream best practice?  There are some samples out there already floating around and being test driven, talked about and even used.  What do you think? 

Well, until Web 2.0 enabled press releases become mainstream, I hope you will see the potential value at least in the three tools I mentioned tonight to help with some of your organization’s external communication efforts. We may not be able to physically integrate all the media channels, but we can closer to streamlining our external communication efforts using these tools.

Have a good day everyone!

Alice M. Fisher

If you would like strategic advisement or help please contact me via email at alicemfisher58@yahoo.com                       Follow @Unlimitedpr  Twitter                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Resume & Profile: http://bit.ly/3kuiuV

Media Landscape Part II

October 10, 2009 3 comments

Well, yesterday  I wrote about the fact that PEW’s 2009 State of the Media Report findings indicated that in the U.S. only about 34% of the population is reading newspapers (personally, I think that is a bit high) and of that number, the readership population is predominantly an older generation, with a few younger audiences  scattered throughout.  Newspaper ad revenues have fallen 23% in the last two years. Some papers are in bankruptcy, and others have lost three-quarters of their value.

By recent calculations, nearly one out of every five journalists working for newspapers in 2001 is now gone, and 2009? Well, that remains to be seen.

And, today, I read AP news and a few others want to charge money for online news content.  “AP, News Corp bosses tell search engines and bloggers that it is time to pay up” Would you pay for online news?  I am not as versed on the international media landscape, but I am sure changes are being felt or noticed overseas as well. I did find a traditional media landscape for Europe for anyone who wants to dig into that area a bit deeper.  But, I digress.

OK, so, does AP and the top News Corp bosses sound a bit panicked here? are they mad?  Is this an attempt to recover from their own dismal landslide in revenues, as previously noted in the Pew 2009 State of the Media Report? I welcome opinions.

Long story short, print media, i.e. newspapers are struggling.  And, if you are unaware of the social media landscape, then developing your strategic public affairs or media relations plan for your organization could render results less than spectacular- you could be in a print newspaper black hole and not even know it.  But, who is reading print these days anyway?  As I mentioned in my previous blog, only about 34% of the people are doing so. And, what predominant age group? 65+ years old. Is this the circle of influencers or your target audience that you want to reach?  I beg, please dig deeper.

When I stumble across companies jumping into the waters of social media unaware “because everyone is doing it or  because it’s the hottest thing out there”, or because public relations agencies are pushing social media practices as a “must have” for their clients as part of their new tool box of capabilities-I become just a little nervous.  But, contrary to what many may say, social media is not a silver bullet, nor is it ideal for every company. It’s a strategy that should be carefully and strategically researched and considered and its subsequent tools which are designed to take companies to where their target audiences are already conversing.

So, today I want to look at what that “new landscape” might look like with a bit more depth. Ultimately, our goal should be to prepare to advance from the basic direct one-way communication strategy, using those basic media tools of yesterday to a more aligned two-way continuous communications model/strategy where there is true engagement.  How, might you ask?

Before you start touting social media, please make sure your own site, your own news room, and press releases are Web 2.0 enabled. Are your own senior executives embracing and using the new media landscape?

Well, first off you need to know what the new media landscape looks like.  With a little research I came across a great little visual source which I just have to share which is a little farther below. After taking a look at it, I image you may be saying…”How can you achieve continuous communications across so many channels, simultaneously?  Believe me, there is a way to do this with a couple strategies. But, stay tuned, as I will get to that on my next blog post.  Now back to our landscape work.

Like I said, being aware of the media landscape is important.  The traditional media sources should not be completely ignored nor forgotten but part of your entire media mix.  Therefore, I am providing a couple of links to the top 100 US newspapers , the top 100 international newspapers, top radio stations by state and DMA as well as TV networks. We will now take into consideration the “other new” channels.

There is no question that social media is responsible for a dramatic shift in the relationship between those who produce news and those who consume it.  And, both traditional and new media are very fragmented.  But, consider it another step in the evolution of a more mature continuous communications model.  YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and blogs, to name just a few, are all incorporating innovative uses of the Internet.  Who are the top dogs (Websites) in the US?

News subscribers are no longer defined as simple recipients of news, getting information by only reading newspapers, watching television or listening to reports on the radio.  Today, consumers of news are also gatherers and distributors of news: they take part in creating it, capturing it, re shaping and disseminating it.

In fact, in a survey of 50 radio newsrooms in the top 50-markets, News Generation uncovered the impact that social media is having in the newsroom.  The survey found that nearly half of the newsrooms (45%) use Twitter and Facebook, to offer their technologically savvy audiences an extension to conventional radio to provide another broadcast platform.  But, there are so many other channels within the social media construct. Therefore, I would like to introduce the social media prism, a lense through which each petal represents a social media channel.

social_media_landscape

Source: Strategically, as a communications professional or agency professional, you should want to find yourself at the center of the prism – whether you’re observing, listening or participating. So, with this conversation landscape noted above, how does one manage all the channels?  How can you be “one with a channel” or even begin to strategize and garner results with this much fragmentation?  Does it make you dizzy just thinking about it?  But, to resonate, to be heard, to listen, to be in the mix, you do have to have some idea of what it all looks like and who is out there.

From my observations, there seems to be four main Web 2.o usages that have evolved.  And, the various topical usage tools and services displayed in this landscape are listed below.

1. Expressing tools allow users to express themselves, discuss and  their social life:

2. Sharing tools allow users to publish and share content:

3. Networking tools allow users to search, connect and interact with each other’s:

4. Playing services that now integrate strong social features:

But, for the communication professional, public affairs, media relations professional do you have to be on top and up to speed on all of them and have uptine # of channel masters working each one? I can hear someone saying in the background now, “I am going to have a media meltdown. How can I keep up?”

Is media still top down? Is it direct one-way communications any more?  Or, is it top down and bottom up simultaneously? Anyone have other thoughts on this evolving social media landscape?  Hurry, it will change yet again! :)

Next, we will look at how to distribute through and connect across multiple media channels after you have strategically performed your target audience research.

Have a good weekend everyone!

Sincerely, Alice M. Fisher


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