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Is Radio Dead? Enter Podcasting!

March 16, 2015 Comments off

Image result for radio microphone wallpaperIs radio dead?  And, should we just burn the old radio microphone? Well for that matter, are all traditional news channels irrelevant? It seems that Native Digital News is the key to the future of media. Even, PEW’s State of the News Media Report for 2014 talked about the shift in the growth in digital reporting.

The following are some key points to consider, from the PEW 2014 overview.  A year ago, the State of The News Media Report struck a somber note, citing evidence of continued declines in the mainstream media that were impacting both content and audience satisfaction. As indicated above and throughout this post, many of these issues still exist, some have deepened and new ones have emerged. Still, the level of new activity during the past year is creating a perception that something important, perhaps even game-changing, is going on.

  1. Digital players have exploded onto the news scene, (and into our personal lives) bringing technological know how and new money which is luring top talent. For example, BuzzFeed, once scoffed at for content viewed as “click bait,” now has a news staff of 170, including top names like Pulitzer Prize-winner Mark Schoofs, and is the kind of place that ProPublica’s Paul Steiger says he would want to work at if he were young again. Mashable now has a news staff of 70 and enticed former New York Times assistant managing editor Jim Roberts to become its chief content officer. And in January of this year, Ezra Klein left the Washington Post for Vox media, which will become the new home for his explanatory journalism concept.
  2. Philanthropic money has increased as well, in many cases focused on smaller outlets seeking to fill the gap in news coverage left by legacy cutbacks. As recently as March 2014, the Jerome L. Greene Foundation announced a $10 million grant to New York Public Radio to help build its digital capabilities, an expressed need among nonprofits.
  3. The year also brought more evidence than ever that news is a part of the explosion of social media and mobile devices, and in a way that could offer opportunity to reach more people with news than ever before. Half of Facebook users get news in their feeds even though they did not go there looking for it. And, the Facebook users who get news at the highest rates are 18-to-29-year-olds.
  4. Here are the events of the past year, put in some perspective. The first-ever accounting found roughly 5,000 full-time professional jobs at nearly 500 digital news outlets, most of which were created in the past half dozen years. But the vast majority of bodies producing original reporting still comes from the newspaper industry. But, those newspaper jobs are far from secure. Full-time professional newsroom employment declined another 6.4% in 2012.
  5. Since the fall of 2013, there has been a dramatic and conspicuous migration of high-profile journalists to digital news ventures. In October, Yahoo hired high-profile New York Times tech columnist David Pogue, who was followed a month later by Times political writer Matt Bai. In late October, former Times assistant managing editor Jim Roberts became chief content officer at Mashable’s growing news operation.
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Photo by: Damien Maloney

Furthermore in support of Pew’s State of the Media research, I’ve read a timely article or two in Wired Magazine of late. There is a huge wave of new media money flooding into the media market. And, the graphic in Wired Magazine was very telling for sure, with $500M going for Vice Media and another $96.5M for Buzz Feed. That’s a lot of money for digital media.

Additionally, Roman Mars, was interviewed in a recent Wired Magazine article about podcasting, and he stated that radio needs a “Tune Up.”  Why? Well, he says, radio used to corner the market back in the day on being close to it’s listeners.” “Listening to NPR became the definition of who you were.”

People and families literally used to gather around their radios to get their news and listen to programs. Those days are far gone, I am afraid to say.

But, podcasting is taking up a growing niche in the news market. It’s not a new technology. And, Mars explains, “There hasn’t been a real spike in podcasts’ popularity so much as long, steady growth in listenership. Mars continues, “But there is a moment happening right now.”   “One piece of that is Serial, which is clearly doing something big and different. Another piece is that Ira Glass was on The Tonight Show and he was talking about podcasts. That’s huge.” And, Roman Mars is building a podcasting Empire, says Wired Magazine!

This niche communications medium is about to explode because of the portability of all our devices today, and how the radio broadcasting and traditional media world must adapt or die as they  continue their downward spiral.

What Roman Mars talks about is that podcasting is so much more personal and intensely close for listeners. It becomes very personal, Mars says. “Podcast listeners are also a very dedicated bunch, and the radio stations just have not gotten it.”  One podcast listener is like having 10,000 listeners on an average quarterly hour (AQH) listenership, because if it is a great podcast they will share it with their friends.

Everyone is multitasking today. And, podcasts are perfectly suited to people having their attention divided in so many different ways, simultaneously. People typically listen to podcasts by themselves, often with ear buds. We are right there, in their ears talking to them.

We’re in a world now where you have something to do at all time, whether it’s commuting on a train, bus or washing dishes and doing laundry or weed whacking the yard. Podcasting is more accessible, more portable.

Podcasts are available all the time, on demand anywhere, 24/365. Podcasts are perfectly oriented for the modern world, you can wash your car to it.

In total, all the new small digital operations have created nearly 2,000 out of the 5,000 full-time editorial jobs PEW identified, and they represent a growing and increasingly important part of a shifting media ecosystem.

Here’s what they’re like: They are young and lean businesses, close to home and a bit more than 50% are opting to run as nonprofits.

Why? Well, refer to the numbers, as I stated before about the new wave of money for digital media… it’s coming from philanthropic organizations, where  61% of the nonprofit news organizations surveyed by Pew Research began with a large start-up grant from these organizations.

As a result of my reading and the direction traditional media has taken (about 11,000 newspaper newsroom jobs were lost as a result of the economic recession), I want to tell you about a new native digital business. I am advising on their digital strategy, and writing for their projects.

Flatlands Ausanga Font medium size image

Enter Podcasting and Flatlands Avenue Productions, LLC.  Please subscribe to them via email, after learning more about their business, the team and their services.

In short, Rita Rich is a great podcast producer, who has partnered with a woman named Debra Grobman. Both used were in radio. Debra is in LA and Rita is in the DC metro area, like myself. And, she has a legal representative in Michigan.

Rita Final Bio She is, and well in fact all of us are shifting how we do news and media outreach to help others tell their story. More intimately, for sure. And, Rita is good at it. She is the voice of Patriot-Made Audio and Canadian Made Audio.

They are fun ladies and have told a lot of stories and experience to share. Does your business have a podcast? Do you need a story told? Consider trying a different medium with far greater reach. You should consider the Debra Final Bioinformation I’ve shared today and how much the media and public relations world has changed.

Here is Flatland’s Pitch Deck for any business, government agency, media entity, PR firm, schools, churches or non profits who might be interested in doing a podcast or audio story.

I believe in their venture because they are-we all are reinventing how business gets done and how to reach more people. with less cost.

If you have a few minutes, please listen to a few recent stories from Flatlands Avenue Productions and their newest client, Romy Gingras and her brand new podcast series,The Bonfires of Social Enterprise. And, of course, Flatland’s has other projects with podcasts as well.

What are your thoughts about social enterprises helping to fix complex social problems?

What do you know or not know about Podcasting?  Let’s keep the conversation going!  Oh, and when you contact Rita, be sure to ask where their business name came from, it’s a great little story as well.

Many thanks for the work done by PEW,  who is Associate Director at the Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project, and  Wired Magazine from which I pulled some of the content to help me write this blog.

Great stuff don’t ya think!? :)  And, if you have a favorite podcast you listen to share it and tell me why you like it? What makes a good podcast would be another great blog post in the near future!

Is Your Creativity Dead?

March 16, 2015 Comments off

Let the Elephants RunI worked on a different blog today, it’s a project I participate in through Canadian Made Audio with a colleague of mine named Rita Rich.  This particular blog is about David Usher, and although I have not read his book, yet. I am going to buy it!

The reason being is that I do consider myself a creative sort. But, the older I’ve become, the more I’ve noticed that somewhere along the way I’ve lost or misplaced large portions of my innate creativity. Life seems to literally suck it out you and away from you. And, if you are TOO creative, well people think you are weird. Many of you may not know this but I actually oil paint. I love art. And, I have not painted in a very long, long time, or at least not regularly.  For some reason I do not feed this side of me, the side which is the core of who I am, quite frankly. I always have to get the chores or other tasks done first.

So, I wrote this blog and well David is many things, a musician, artist, author, public speaker, business entrepreneur and activist.  He is also British-born Canadian, and CanadianMade Audio producer Rita Rich talks with David about his new best-selling book, Let The Elephants Run.  Listen to her interview with him here.  I am inspired!   

Well, David’s new best-selling book is all about letting our creative pink elephants run wild. Let the Elephants Songs From The Last Day On EarthRun shows us how to reignite creativity whether in the head office, the home office or the artist’s studio.  He says in this latest podcast interview with Rita Rich, that in today’s world with the Internet, five people are likely working on the very same idea you are, at the same time.  But, it’s not so important about being the first to come up with a creative idea anymore, but in fact, being able to deliver that creative idea.

It seems that our day to day lives tends to stifle all the creativity out of us. But, David believes creativity is in our DNA; it’s in everyone, not just the one in the creative art class. We all start our lives as very creative beings, but for many that spark becomes lost over time. How do we jump-start our creative process as adults? What does it means to be a creative person? How do we follow through with our ideas and turn them into tangible outcomes?

Read more about David Usher, his book, his music, and his business here at www.canadianmadeaudio.com

AP Style for States Abbreviations

March 14, 2015 Comments off

We live in a rapid news “now” world., What I am seeing, as we move away from traditional media outreach through the use of press releases is that people are forgetting AP style formatting. There is indeed a science and art behind writing a press release. Below is a list of AP Style State abbreviations. So, I am providing a reference for those who may be interested.

Note: AP Style state abbreviations differ from their corresponding US Postal Service abbreviations, are in parentheses.

  • Ala. (AL) — for Alabama
  • Alaska (AK) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Ariz. (AZ) — for Arizona
  • Ark. (AR) — for Arkansas
  • Calif. (CA) — for California
  • Colo. (CO) — for Colorado
  • Conn. (CT) — for Connecticut
  • Del. (DE) — for Delaware
  • Fla. (FL) — for Florida
  • Ga. (GA) — for Georgia
  • Hawaii (HI) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Idaho (ID) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Ill. (IL) — for Illinois
  • Ind. (IN) — for Indiana
  • Iowa (IA) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Kan. (KS) — for Kansas
  • Ky. (KY) — for Kentucky
  • La. (LA) — for Louisiana
  • Maine (ME) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Md. (MD) — for Maryland
  • Mass. (MA) — for Massachusetts
  • Mich (MI) — for Michigan
  • Minn. (MN) — for Minnesota
  • Miss. (MS) — for Mississippi
  • Mo. (MO) — for Missouri
  • Mont. (MT) — for Montana
  • Neb. (NE) — for Nebraska
  • Nev. (NV) — for Nevada
  • N.H. (NH) — for New Hampshire
  • N.J. (NJ) — for New Jersey
  • N.M. (NM) — for New Mexico
  • N.Y. (NY) — for New York
  • N.C. (NC) — for North Carolina
  • N.D. (ND) — for North Dakota
  • Ohio (OH) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Okla. (OK) — for Oklahoma
  • Ore. (OR) — for Oregon
  • Pa. (PA) — for Pennsylvania
  • R.I. (RI) — for Rhode Island
  • S.C. (SC) — for South Carolina
  • S.D. (SD) — for South Dakota
  • Tenn. (TN) — for Tennessee
  • Texas (TX) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Utah (UT) — this state is not abbreviated in text
  • Vt. (VT) — for Vermont
  • Va. (VA) — for Virginia
  • Wash. (WA) — for Washington
  • W. Va. (WV) — for West Virginia
  • Wis. (WI) — for Wisconsin
  • Wyo. (WY) — for Wyoming
  • Also: District of Columbia (DC)

Here’s an example of how to abbreviate a state in a sentence using AP style:

In Detroit, Mich., the weather today is sunny and warm. 

And, here is how to use a city (and state) in the dateline.

DETROIT, March 14, 2015 –

Remember that, in datelines, the city name is in all capital letters. If necessary, follow it with the state abbreviation –– not the U.S. postal code.(For example: KANSAS CITY, Kan. or KANSAS CITY, Mo.)

However, these states are always spelled out: Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

The following list are US domestic cities that stand alone, with no state abbreviation.

ATLANTA,  BALTIMORE,  BOSTON, CHICAGO,  CINCINNATI,  CLEVELAND, DALLAS,

DENVER,  DETROIT, HONOLULU, HOUSTON,  INDIANAPOLIS,  LAS VEGAS,  LOS ANGELES 

MIAMI,  MILWAUKEE, MINNEAPOLIS,  NEW ORLEANS,  NEW YORK,

OKLAHOMA CITY,  PHILADELPHIA,  PHOENIX,  PITTSBURGH,

ST. LOUIS,  SALT LAKE CITY,  SAN ANTONIO,  SAN DIEGO,  SAN FRANCISCO,  SEATTLE,

WASHINGTON

*On a regional level, additional cities may stand alone should the newspaper staff decide so.

“Can We Live on USA Made Only?” Interview

September 30, 2014 Comments off

To Write or Not too Right?

March 16, 2013 Comments off

image We are raising future generations who may not be able to write, period.  I guess I would be considered a cursive loyalist.  I mean I worked so hard to learn this skill and was so proud to be able to write like adults. It felt like a secret language in and of it self, when I was a child.

Does it bother anyone else that cursive writing may be on the way out? Are you concerned that your children or the very next generation of children won’t even know what it is, much less how to write in cursive.   If I were choosing a school for my children, I would seek out the ones that still teach the basics.  And, then add in technology, as a secondary or third tier requirement.                     I love modern technology. But we should not give up teaching written communication, more importantly, cursive writing.

“For centuries, cursive handwriting has been an art. To a growing number of young people, it is a mystery. The sinuous letters of the cursive alphabet, swirled on countless love letters, credit card slips and banners above elementary school chalk boards are going the way of the quill and inkwell. With computer keyboards and smartphones increasingly occupying young fingers, the gradual death of the fancier ABC’s is revealing some unforeseen challenges.” ~Katie Zezima, The New York Times, Published: April 27, 2011 “The Case for Cursive.”

Cursive handwriting has been taught for more than 300 years in U.S. schools and has gone through various phases as noted in another similar blog.

It was once the primary method of communication. And, my grandmother Edith Faulstich was a collector of letters and “covers” all hand written, of course. The oldest hand written letter I ever saw was a clay tablet from Eygpt, the she had in her personal collection. Another was from the 1700’s with a red wax seal on it.  I was very young back then, but the handwriting was alluring and sexy.

Handwriting, was used for all public documents, such as land deeds, legal paperwork, and business records, and for personal letters and even generals’ orders in battle. The quality of cursive writing was an indicator of social status and educational level (Mehegan, 2009; Supon, 2009; Wolfe, 2009; Wallace & Schomer, 1994).

For decades, American students spent 45 minutes every day learning and practicing cursive writing.

Until the 1970s, penmanship was a separate daily lesson from first through sixth grade and a separate grade on report cards. Since that time, however, its importance in the elementary school curriculum has declined steadily (New American Cursive Penmanship Program, 2009; Carpenter, 2007; Pressler, 2006; Francis, 2000).

For more reading, here is a very recent article on the cursive debate:

  • Common Core State Standards for what students are expected to learn have been picked up by most of the states in the union. Those standards don’t require cursive. Keyboarding skills, however, are featured in the writing standards. That means most states no longer have a mandate for teaching cursive.
  • In the 1960s and 1970s, the Zaner-Bloser Company, which has been publishing a penmanship curriculum since 1904, recommended 40 minutes of handwriting instruction per day. By the 1980s, it suggested just 15 minutes. Zaner-Bloser offers course work through eighth grade but admits that schools rarely buy writing materials beyond the third grade.
  • According to a 2007 nationwide survey on handwriting instruction by researchers at Vanderbilt University (Graham et al., 2007), cursive handwriting is still widely taught in U.S. public and private schools. The researchers surveyed a random sample of about 200 teachers in grades 1-3 in all 50 states. Ninety percent of the responding teachers stated that their schools required instruction in handwriting. In schools that taught handwriting, 50 percent of second grade teachers and 90 percent of third grade teachers offered instruction in cursive handwriting.
  • In Zaner-Bloser’s 2005 national survey, a majority of elementary school teachers reported spending one hour or less on handwriting per week Suddath, 2009; Kelley, 2007).  Teachers reported that they spent about 60 minutes per week, or 12-15 minutes per day, teaching cursive. Graham and colleagues (2007) cautioned that survey results were based on self-reported numbers and that a separate study with direct observation of 22 teachers in one school district found that far less time was devoted to cursive handwriting.
  • Graham and colleagues (2007) also reported that school districts varied significantly in the amount of handwriting instruction they provided to students. For example, the researchers visited second and third grade classrooms that offered virtually no instruction in cursive handwriting.

In general, their observations of U.S. classrooms found that the emphasis in U.S. schools have shifted from the formation of letters to the ability to write legibly and efficiently. Other researchers have noted that cursive writing’s declining importance in the curriculum is reflected by a lessening of the standards used to evaluate it. Over the years, the goal of teaching penmanship has shifted from “high quality” to “legibility” (Pressler, 2006; Wallace & Schomer, 1994).

Share this post if you support cursive writing as core curriculum in schools and across education.

We can’t dare forget how to communicate with written language…..will we soon be a society of illiterates?

Holiday Shopping| E-tailers

December 2, 2012 3 comments

Save GreenThe initial purpose of this post is to help you save some “green,” and to be greener during the holidays. And if I can help you save you some time and save the environment by cutting down on your use of gasoline while holiday shopping, then that’s great.

By far, my favorite shopping App is Redlaser!  It is a “Top 10 Must Have App for your IPhone” ―says  The New York Times ,  “If you only have one shopping app on your cell Phone, this is the one to have.”― Digital Trends.  I have used it for ALL of my holiday shopping both online and locally and have saved several hundred dollars already.

A Selection of Useful Holiday Shopping Tidbits:   

Consider making your own homemade holiday gifts as well.   I would love to hear from others who have made their own unique gifts.

I have sprinkled in some other social news  below for additional holiday cheer.

It’s Official: Facebook Apps Have a Share Button (AllFacebook). Users asked for it, and Facebook responded. The social network announced Thursday that its native applications for iOS and Android devices now include a share button. That means that folks using either app can now pass on their witty musings, puppy pictures or daddy daughter dance pictures to their online friends with a simple tap in their news feeds [Engadget]

There is now a BandPage Connect Plugs Bands Into Promoters, Fans, Facebook [AllFacebook}]

TechCrunch Facebook’s iOS users have long been able to tag friends in posts, but had to append them to the end of the update as “with [Drew Olanoff].” That made for some funky grammar, or redundancy if you needed to refer to a specific friend in the text of your update. Now you can tag friends in-line so your prose flows.

LA Times / Tech Now Additionally, Apple device users can now send each other Facebook messages with smileys and other icons from the emoji keyboard. The keyboard can be enabled in the iOS Settings app.

When Colleges Woo Students Through Social Media: Less Viewbooks, More Facebook (Time)
When Ashley Romero found out she had been accepted to the University of Georgia, it wasn’t through a letter in the mail. It wasn’t even by logging onto her computer and visiting Georgia’s admissions website. It was on her iPhone, as she and a friend were driving down the highway toward summer camp.

Who Mapped It Best During Election 2012? (CJR / Between the Spreadsheets).  As CJR‘s Meta Newsroom showed, a glut of media outlets incorporated digital innovation into their reporting during the recent election. One resurfaced over and again: the map. For the outlets just dipping their toes into the data journalism sea, maps presented a relatively easy opportunity to make interactive. For the heavyweights, it was a chance to wade in much deeper.

Upcoming Events: 

Inside Social Apps  – Developing & Monetizing on Social & Mobile Platforms, December 3 | New York City
Inside Social Apps brings together today’s leading developers of social and mobile apps and games for an intensive summit on the future of app and game growth and monetization on social and mobile platforms. Register now.

Online Production for Writers and Editors – starts November 20 | ONLINE
Create multi-dimensional content for digital mediums. Learn more.

My Sources Today Came From: Morning Media Newsfeed & Mashable

Morning Media Newsfeed Say they needs you! Send them your story tips, job changes, insider gossip, and all that other good stuff: tips@mediabistro.com. More than 160,000 people in the media business read this email every day. To learn about advertising or other creative partnerships, contact Dave Arganbright at   (212) 547-7931  or via email.

A Perspective on The Economy

November 3, 2012 Comments off

A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE.

We are an impatient people.  And, no matter who becomes the next president, one can not microwave (systemic) change. It took a full ten+ years to pull us out of the great depression. We complain about our national debt but change begins at the individual level as well. Who of you in four years has paid down All of your OWN debt or have you just continued to go farther into debt. I am personally trying to get out of debt, but it seems like a loosing battle.

How many of you have hired just one extra person for a job to keep a family from going under, (split a higher paying job budget between two workers)?

How many of you have fed or invited an unemployed family down the street from you who is in foreclosure for dinner?

Change, starts with us, from the bottom up and not from the top down in all our efforts.

What ever similarities are drawn from the Great Depression and what we see today. Can we really immediate change in under 4 years?

1) I believe that there are two major differences in the economic circumstances of 1933 and 2008 which transcend other issues and have literally saved us in some respects comparatively speaking.  First, thousands of banks “failed” between 1929 and 1933, wiping out the savings of millions of “hard-working, playing by the rules” middle-class Americans.

Since fall 2008, not a single depositor in a U.S. bank has lost a dime of savings due to FDR’s Banking Act of 1933, which created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Even though we’ve had banks fail or close.

While the stock market and housing prices tanked, the fact that bank accounts were intact was of immense psychological value to savers at all income levels. Undoubtedly, this depositor sense of security had a positive effect on the stock market rebounding fairly quickly so now it is more than double what it was in February 2009.

2) Secondly, and just as importantly, because of Social Security, which started in 1935, the purchasing power of today’s seniors has been greatly, although not entirely, protected. Social Security payments, combined with the unemployment insurance benefits (also initiated in 1935) paid to the millions laid off due to the downturn, have kept consumer purchases much more stable than they otherwise would have been. This is in contrast to the complete removal by 1933 of the purchasing power of nearly 25 percent of the workforce that became suddenly unemployed. The economy just shriveled up.

1. Stock Market Crash of 1929

Many believe erroneously that the stock market crash that occurred on Black Tuesday, October 29, 1929 is one and the same with the Great Depression. In fact, it was one of the major causes that led to the Great Depression. Two months after the original crash in October, stockholders had lost more than $40 billion dollars. Even though the stock market began to regain some of its losses, by the end of 1930, it just was not enough and America truly entered what is called the Great Depression.

2. Bank Failures

Throughout the 1930’s more than 9,000 banks failed. (Since 2008-through 2012, 465 banks have failed)                Bank deposits were uninsured in the 1930 and thus as banks failed back then, people simply lost their savings. Surviving banks, unsure of the economic situation and concerned for their own survival, stopped being as willing to create new loans. This exacerbated the situation leading to less and less expenditures.

3. Reduction in Purchasing Across the Board

With the stock market crash, and the fears of further economic woes, individuals from all classes stopped purchasing items. This then led to a reduction in the number of items produced and thus a reduction in the workforce. As people lost their jobs, they were unable to keep up with paying for items they had bought through installment plans and their items were repossessed. More and more inventory began to accumulate. The unemployment rate rose above 25% which meant, of course, even less spending to help alleviate the economic situation.

4. American Economic Policy with Europe

As businesses began failing, the government created the Smoot-Hawley Tariff in 1930 to help protect American companies. This charged a high tax for imports thereby leading to less trade between America and foreign countries along with some economic retaliation.

5. Drought Conditions

While not a direct cause of the Great Depression, the drought that occurred in the Mississippi Valley in 1930 was of such proportions that many could not even pay their taxes or other debts and had to sell their farms for no profit to themselves. The area was nicknamed “The Dust Bowl.” This was the topic of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath.

6. Unemployment to continue to purchase goods and services within the economy

Throughout the Great Depression, there was little information on the extent of unemployment in the country. More important, there was no good way to assess whether the situation was getting better or worse. The wealth of timely statistical information on the labor market that we now take for granted simply didn’t exist. Throughout the 1930s, researchers grappled with the issue of how to measure unemployment. To begin with, there wasn’t agreement on how to conceptualize or define the condition. Simply asking those out of work if they “wanted” work or if they were “able” or “willing” to work proved to be too subjective to serve as unemployment criteria. At the same time, attempts to gauge the number of jobless by looking at declines in employment or counting the registrations at public employment offices were found to be incomplete. By the way, the second dip during the Depression was in 1937 and came as a result of austerity measures.

The whole unemployment schema today is a numbers game and  it all depends on which lens one is looking through to sell those numbers. Systemically, we have more people, more kids, more families to feed no ifs and or butts about it, but today we are better off than many were in 1930’s.

One unemployment perspective today is about the actual current civilian workforce vs. the total US population. Many of our unemployed have dropped of the employment “books”. Times are tough, for most.

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